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  1. #1
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    The mental rollercoaster of buying a new bike

    Reading these forums is the absolute WORST thing you can do while deciding on a new bike to buy.

    I'm currently riding a nice, but old, 26" HT that I built up in 2005 but I'm ready for something new. I'm old enough that the cost isn't as much of an issue as it was when I was younger...but the decision making process is MUCH harder. I want to build a dream bike and I know exactly what that bike is...today. But EVERY time I read the forums, I change my mind.

    Initial thought: Yeti ARC. I fell in love with Yeti's when I started riding in the late 80s but have never owned one. The ARC is the quintessential lightweight HT so that's what I'm getting.

    Reading the forums: Yeti ASR-5. ARC? Really? The 26" HT is dead, man, join us in this century! OK, fine. I'll go with that drop-dead-sexy ASR-5. Light, climbs great. 5" travel.

    Reading the 29er forum: Yeti Big Top. 26" wheels? Are you serious? Everyone is on 29s. Look at the top 100,000 riders on the Galactic World Cup standings and they are all on 29" wheels.

    Reading the Yeti forum: Niner Air 9. KevinGT, you are WAY too short for a Big Top at 5' 6". They start at a medium. You need a small 29er that's designed for short people.

    Reading the XC Racing forum: Yet to be named 650b HT. Have you seen the pictures of those short riders on their 29ers? ROFL! They are using -25 deg stems just to fit onto the silly things! Shorter riders need to be on 650b. That's the future of mountain biking anyway.

    Reading the 650b forum: Yeti ASR-5. 650b is still in its infancy and it will be a while before there are any good race-quality HT frames on the market. Hey, maybe Yeti will make a 650b ARC!

    Full circle...



    (DISCLAIMER: This post was not intended to insult riders of 26" HTs, small-framed 29ers, or early 650b adopters!)
    I live with fear and danger every day. And on the weekends she lets me go mountain biking.

  2. #2
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    The mental rollercoaster of buying a new bike

    The solution is to read less and go to demo day. Yay, yeti!
    Wanted: WTB rollercams and brake bridges

  3. #3
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    I feel ya. Recently ordered a bike I've never ridden. Was pretty worried about sizing until I actually got on it. Relieved.

    Sizing and tires are two things the LBS does best.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    The solution is to read less and go to demo day. Yay, yeti!
    That's great advice.

    Even better is to simply ride my bike more. My choice after finishing a ride on my 26" HT is simply "This bike is perfect. Why would I want anything else??"
    I live with fear and danger every day. And on the weekends she lets me go mountain biking.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    That's great advice.

    Even better is to simply ride my bike more. My choice after finishing a ride on my 26" HT is simply "This bike is perfect. Why would I want anything else??"
    Ha,,, I have a 26" hardtail I build back in 2003. There are so many new bikes I could get that are so much better on paper, but I never have had a bad day riding in the 26er. I could buy a new bike, but would I have any more fun? The only issue with old bikes that is if parts start to fail due to usage it will eventually get to the point where it costs too much to maintain since there are no replacement parts for older standards. I had a heck of a time looking for replacement middle chain ring for my XT M750 series cranks. I found the middle, but could not a find big ring for it. 2-3 part failures could easily lead to replacing a host of parts to make them work together and it just maybe better to get a new bike at that point.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  6. #6
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    That's great advice.

    Even better is to simply ride my bike more. My choice after finishing a ride on my 26" HT is simply "This bike is perfect. Why would I want anything else??"
    I know. I ride full rigids and love them for my terrain. I wouldn't do it in Arizona or the NE though. So...kind of gotta match the bike to how and where you ride.

    p.s. I have an 80's FRO.

    Hey JoePA, I know what you mean but vintage parts aren't that expensive. Just a little more effort than just to walk into the store or find it online at a big retailer. (I think you can order those replacement rings through QBP.) But I get what you're saying though. There is a point where it doesn't make sense unless you are committed to the bike or have a fondness for vintage like I do.

  7. #7
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Here's the demo dates for Yeti: Yeti Cycles / Home

    I think last year they didn't have the 66 carbons available. There's a guy from Yeti that will post in mtbr regarding demo days, so keep a lookout for him. (here he is in 2012 California: Yeti Demos)

    I'm so excited for you. I'd like the asr-5c.

  8. #8
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    Re: The mental rollercoaster of buying a new bike

    Get all five.

    "So I'm packing my bag for the misty mountain.."

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    Here's the demo dates for Yeti: Yeti Cycles / Home

    I think last year they didn't have the 66 carbons available. There's a guy from Yeti that will post in mtbr regarding demo days, so keep a lookout for him. (here he is in 2012 California: Yeti Demos)

    I'm so excited for you. I'd like the asr-5c.
    Thanks. I actually have a LBS that has an ASR-5C demo in my size (small). Unfortunately, we've had nothing but rain for 6 weeks in GA so I'm having trouble getting the time to go demo one!
    I live with fear and danger every day. And on the weekends she lets me go mountain biking.

  10. #10
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    Great sales on Yeti ASR5's at Competitive Cyclist right now. They are trying to clear out the last of the alloy's since Yeti is no longer offering them. In case you guys didn't already know...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jasondenney View Post
    Great sales on Yeti ASR5's at Competitive Cyclist right now. They are trying to clear out the last of the alloy's since Yeti is no longer offering them. In case you guys didn't already know...
    I bought the last small black they had in stock. I watched the inventory drop by a frame a day for the last week or so and pulled the trigger when it got to 1.

    I demo'd the ASR-5C on Saturday and was blown away. Can't wait to build it up now!
    I live with fear and danger every day. And on the weekends she lets me go mountain biking.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    I bought the last small black they had in stock. I watched the inventory drop by a frame a day for the last week or so and pulled the trigger when it got to 1.

    I demo'd the ASR-5C on Saturday and was blown away. Can't wait to build it up now!
    Congratulations man, they are such fun bikes! I snagged up one of the medium alloys and built this bad boy.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The mental rollercoaster of buying a new bike-img_2206.jpg  


  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    Reading these forums is the absolute WORST thing you can do while deciding on a new bike to buy.

    I'm currently riding a nice, but old, 26" HT that I built up in 2005 but I'm ready for something new. I'm old enough that the cost isn't as much of an issue as it was when I was younger...but the decision making process is MUCH harder. I want to build a dream bike and I know exactly what that bike is...today. But EVERY time I read the forums, I change my mind.

    Initial thought: Yeti ARC. I fell in love with Yeti's when I started riding in the late 80s but have never owned one. The ARC is the quintessential lightweight HT so that's what I'm getting.

    Reading the forums: Yeti ASR-5. ARC? Really? The 26" HT is dead, man, join us in this century! OK, fine. I'll go with that drop-dead-sexy ASR-5. Light, climbs great. 5" travel.

    Reading the 29er forum: Yeti Big Top. 26" wheels? Are you serious? Everyone is on 29s. Look at the top 100,000 riders on the Galactic World Cup standings and they are all on 29" wheels.

    Reading the Yeti forum: Niner Air 9. KevinGT, you are WAY too short for a Big Top at 5' 6". They start at a medium. You need a small 29er that's designed for short people.

    Reading the XC Racing forum: Yet to be named 650b HT. Have you seen the pictures of those short riders on their 29ers? ROFL! They are using -25 deg stems just to fit onto the silly things! Shorter riders need to be on 650b. That's the future of mountain biking anyway.

    Reading the 650b forum: Yeti ASR-5. 650b is still in its infancy and it will be a while before there are any good race-quality HT frames on the market. Hey, maybe Yeti will make a 650b ARC!

    Full circle...



    (DISCLAIMER: This post was not intended to insult riders of 26" HTs, small-framed 29ers, or early 650b adopters!)
    Since money isnt an issue, rent bikes. Commit to rent around 10 bikes (I rented 4). Commit to renting some bikes twice. Rent bikes from different shops. You will spend about $500 renting bikes. Find a trail that is somewhat technical, categorize the criteria you are looking for and then rate each bike after you ride. It might help to have a GPS and use strava to get some objective measures. You might feel like a bike is slow, but that may actually end up being fast. By renting bikes you will at least get to start riding.

    Uphill climbs smooth
    Uphill climbs technical
    downhill twisty
    downhill technical


    Also if money isnt an issue, but a used hardtail in the $1200 range so you can at least have a baseline to compare to. Ride that bike maybe 10-20 1-2 hour sessions to establish the baseline on a particular trail. Compare the demo bikes from above to the baseline bike. You can either sell the bike when you are done or decide it is worth it to keep a hardtail.

  14. #14
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    I was riding a very mediocre fs bike (at least that's what I thought about it) and went to a demo day at the local bike park last June to see what all I've been missing out on. After the first two bikes I tested (both well reviewed bikes by highly rated brands), I ended up quite sure that my existing bike, while not as good as either of the two I tested, was actually good enough that I would rather keep the money in my bank than buy a new bike. Then, I tested a third bike that became my new bike. Within 30 minutes of starting my test, I was so stoked about how good the bike felt compared to my old bike and the two I'd just demo'd that I had to have it. Two days later, I found what I wanted in a LBS, and the rest is history. Lesson for me was that in spite of what the reviews said and what the specs said, etc, had I bought one of the other two bikes based on reputation and reviews without giving them a realistic test, I would have missed out on what turned out to be the bike that was best for me. Strongly suggest you keep an open mind about Yeti (which without doubt are very nice bikes) compared to the other highly regarded brands. A great bike for some reviewer or other riders might not be a great bike for you. Test them yourself and your gut will tell you the right bike to buy - or maybe even show you that what you are riding right now is what's right for you.

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