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  1. #1
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    Making SPD pedals easier to use

    I'm not sure if this has been done or not. I'm not even sure if it's a good idea (I'll be testing it tomorrow). If anyone has done this, I'd be interested in their results.

    First, I just switched from platform to clipless pedals. I started with the Shimano MT50s. Shimano says these pedals are 60% easier to get in and out of than SPD pedals. I wanted to use a better pedal with more clearance, so I got a pair of XT trail pedals. But even on their lightest setting, they were too hard to get out of. I only narrowly averted disaster on a ride this morning.

    Upon inspection, it appears that the MT50 is easier to get out of simply due to using lighter springs on the part of the the pedal that rotates and releases the back part of the cleat. I notice that each of the rotating plates had two springs operating on them. So, this made me wonder, could I further reduce spring tension on my XT pedals simply by removing one of the springs. The answer is yes.

    The first thing I did was remove the three screws attaching the plate that holds the front of the cleat. Remove the plate and this relieves tension on the springs. There is a screw that the springs pivot about. Loosen this screw and carefully remove the screw just enough to drop one of the springs. Be careful not to pull the screw too much as the adjustment screw will drop out. This happened to me on one of the sides... but I got it back together with some effort. Once the spring is removed, I replace the pivot screw and replaced the plate.

    Now my pedals are VERY easy to get out of. I can still tighten the remaining springs to increase tension on the rotating plate. Now I don't fear falling over on my bike with my feet stuck in pedals. I can increase spring tension incrementally to train myself on proper use. But this only allows me to skip the scary learning period.

  2. #2
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    Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Which cleat are you using? SH51? You may want to change it to an SH56
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  3. #3
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    I am using SH56s. I understand the difference. I didn't really post this seeing advice. I just got tired of reading people's unhelpful advice telling new clipless riders that they should just try harder.

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    Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Since you did not mention which cleat you are using i just thought you were using an SH51 which usually comes stock and IS really, for me, hard to get out of..
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  5. #5
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    The only way to make SPD pedals easier......is practice.

    Probably not what you wanted to hear......but the bottom line is that it is not rocket science. There is a learning curve.

    THere are too many riders out there using them that figured it out.

    I would not start pulling parts off your pedals to try and make them easier.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikej View Post
    The only way to make SPD pedals easier......is practice.

    Probably not what you wanted to hear......but the bottom line is that it is not rocket science. There is a learning curve.

    THere are too many riders out there using them that figured it out.

    I would not start pulling parts off your pedals to try and make them easier.
    ^^ This.

    Really.

    That is all.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikej View Post
    The only way to make SPD pedals easier......is practice.

    Probably not what you wanted to hear......but the bottom line is that it is not rocket science. There is a learning curve.

    THere are too many riders out there using them that figured it out.

    I would not start pulling parts off your pedals to try and make them easier.
    Sorry... but you are simply wrong.

    Anyway, I posted this thread for people who are new to clipless. I didn't post it to be a troll feeding ground.

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    I used to have the 540 and I liked them, easy to get in and out. Then I bought the new trail XT and even on the lightest spring setting, it was harder to get out of than the 540. My guess is that the 540 springs are either softer or they are worn (bought them used), and the XT being new. Mind you I used the same cleats on both pedals. Then I got new cleats for the XT and it was still harder. But you do learn how to get out of them properly after many uses, pratice.

  9. #9
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    We were ALL new to clipless at one point. I've never known a rider to have a learning curve issue that has driven them to do such a thing to their pedal. This leads me to wonder how much side to side float do you have in your pedal before it unclips. Perhaps you have some interference between the sole of your shoe and the pedal frame that puts the float under too much tension. I just experienced that with a new pair of Shimano M162 shoes and the PD-M530 pedals (which I just bent and replaced with XT's today). I had to dremel the sole a slight amount to increase the ease of float because my knee was having grief.

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    Jimbo nice mod but after 10 hours of practicing you will have confidence in the pedals.

    Unfortunately yours are lacking the tension that allow for good riding. I suggest you put that spring back in.

    Depending on situation clipping out unwanted can be as bad (if not worse) as not being able to clip out when you desire.

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    Something else is wrong, because even with the 51 cleats, on the easiest setting, I can easily pop feet out...as in takes almost no effort and wasn't even really rideable. It doesn't make sense that you would have issues with even the lowest tension setting.

    As far as being a post to help new riders, it isn't. If it works for you for whatever reason, then fine, but this isn't a 'mod' that should be encouraged to new riders. There really is a learning curve for most people to learn to ride clipless pedals. They work a certain way for a reason.

  12. #12
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    I agree with above statements. I'm glad you found a happy medium but I would not encourage anyone to make the mods you have done. Clipless pedals are a tool which needs to be learned how to use. You will fail at times! I am sure everyone here riding clipless will tell you they have crashes of varying degrees due to their pedals. That's the way it is...period. They make strapless toe cages that may be more to your liking.

  13. #13
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    Also spd is not the only game in town, their are other options from time, crank Bros etc. Personally I don't have an issue with spd but I prefer the feel of the time atac setup. So I would maybe try some other brands before trying to Frankenstein a set of pedals just from a safety pov.
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  14. #14
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    I'm pretty new to clipless (1 yr.) and I would have never thought of doing something like this. Within the first couple of rides I was cranking the tension up. Mine are xt. On the lightest setting I was popping my foot out at the worst possible moments.

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    Last edited by hey_poolboy; 08-31-2014 at 06:48 PM.

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    Great write up. Ive been usung SPDs for 14 yrs and still get "stuck" in them every once in a while. I have the scars and bruises to prove it..lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    Sorry... but you are simply wrong.

    Anyway, I posted this thread for people who are new to clipless. I didn't post it to be a troll feeding ground.
    Doubt I am the one who is wrong.....since I have been running clipless since '96, when pedals were not nearly as nice as they are now....I think I have some experience.

    BTW....my pedal tension is cranked up to the max, and I have zero issued getting in and out of them. And I didn't even have to modify mine.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    I am using SH56s. I understand the difference. I didn't really post this seeing advice. I just got tired of reading people's unhelpful advice telling new clipless riders that they should just try harder.
    You may not have intended this post for seeking advice, but as with any post in a discussion forum, thats what youll get. If you just wanted to put it out there without any feedback, you should start a blog or something.

    SPD user here, and when I was using the 56 cleats, tension in the lightest setting was way too loose for my liking.. as others as said, this mostly seems like a beginner mod.
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  18. #18
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    Interesting mod. If it works for you do it. I wonder if perhaps it is not spring tension but shoe sole friction on the pedal? I had one version of Shimano shoes M240 that fit tightly against the pedal body which because of of the friction made the pedal tougher to release from. I was fine with that though and liked the more stable connection.

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    I'm really disappointed by the condescending posts here. The only thing I have done is to extend the adjustability range of the SPD pedals such that they are similar to the Shimano Click'r pedals. I rode with the "Frankenstein pedals" today and they were great. No problem with unwanted releases, but I could ride technical terrain without the anxiety of maybe not getting out.

    It seems to me that the first thing that the "experts" here do when anyone talks about starting clipless is that they should reduce the tension as much as possible. So, the "experts" recognize that reducing tension is a valid training tool. Well, I did that... and then some. And it worked great.

    As much as the "experts" don't want to admit it... there are a lot of people that don't do clipless because they don't want to go through the bruise filled training period. Shimano recognized this... that's why they came out with the MT50 Click'r pedals. Well, this gives those people a training option without having to buy an extra set of pedals. I was really expecting a different reaction. Something other than clipless snobs.

  20. #20
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    You're new to the Internet aren't you?

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    Best way to make SPD easier is to switch back to flats............

  22. #22
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    Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Just switch to crank bros. egg beaters are stupid easy to get out of and so are the candys.


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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    You're new to the Internet aren't you?
    Amen

    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Best way to make SPD easier is to switch back to flats............
    No joke. Not everyone needs to ride clipless pedals. I rode them for 14yrs because there wasn't a better alternative for a long time. But now there are solid alternatives in one of the MANY dozens of models of pinned platforms. For any budget. Now I have pinned platforms on even my commute bike, because they just fit the way I ride better.

    Yes, the Clickr pedals have lower spring tension for beginners. Explain again why you bought the XT Trail pedals and then modified them to be more like the Clickr pedals? That thought process just isn't registering for me.

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    Why would I want to switch to egg beaters??? My XTs work great!

    Are you guys really so scared of modifying anything on your bike? I'm amazed not only at the fear factor of trying something new, but the condescension aimed at that which is feared.

    I'll tell you what... those who are interested in a modified XT pedal should post here. Those who think that it is unsafe, irresponsible or heresy to the Shimano Gods should just find a different thread. I really have no interest in the opinions of trolls.

  25. #25
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    A ingenious solution to a non-existent problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Amen



    No joke. Not everyone needs to ride clipless pedals. I rode them for 14yrs because there wasn't a better alternative for a long time. But now there are solid alternatives in one of the MANY dozens of models of pinned platforms. For any budget. Now I have pinned platforms on even my commute bike, because they just fit the way I ride better.

    Yes, the Clickr pedals have lower spring tension for beginners. Explain again why you bought the XT Trail pedals and then modified them to be more like the Clickr pedals? That thought process just isn't registering for me.

    After riding the Click'rs for a couple hundred miles, I bought a new bike and had some XTs thrown into the deal. I took them out and was not comfortable on them at all. I understand that they are not that hard to get out of.... when you try to get out correctly. But when there is something unexpected, reflexes don't move my foot in the right direction. Muscle memory has to be developed. I just don't want to get bruised up trying to develop the muscle memory.

    With the modified pedal, I don't have the anxiety of the pending fall over. So, I can ride the way I rode with my platforms with the confidence that I can get my foot to the ground quickly as a reflex action. As muscle memory develops, I'm sure I'll be cranking up the spring tension.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by zyzbot View Post
    A ingenious solution to a non-existent problem.
    A troll post....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    A troll post....
    when everyone is telling you the same thing... which posts become the troll posts?
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  29. #29
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    You take something that is a proven product, the SPD pedal, and you modify it. Why hasn't this been done in the past? No need to. You learn how to unclip, plain and simple. Just like you learn to ride a bike, the muscle memory will get you unclipped. In other words, you don't reinvent the wheel, especially when your modified pedal is questionably safe at best. Shimano has been making the SPD pedals how long now? You would think that they would have it just about right by now, right?

    Shoe interference was the biggest hinderance for me. I have a pair of Shimano MTB shoes that have 0 clearance issues. I bought a pair of casual Chrome brand shoes, and there is all kinds of interference not allowing me to unclip. I should take the Dremel to the sole of the shoe to rectify it really. I have crashed on the road because of it.

    You take the bike out in the yard, or a grassy area, and you ride around, and practice unclipping. We all have done it. We all more than likely, have also fallen because of it the first time out. My now ex wife fell in the yard the first day, hell she barely made it out into the yard before she fell. I fell on my first trail ride. After that, I never crashed or fell due to the fact that I couldn't get unclipped. You train your brain to remember that you are clipped in, and that you need to unclip when you come to a stop. Just like you have to take your foot off the pedal. You had to learn how to do that.

    If my post comes across as condescending, I won't apologize. You simply gave up, and are trying to figure out a way to bypass learning how to do it. Lets call it for what it is.
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    Re: Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    I am using SH56s. I understand the difference. I didn't really post this seeing advice. I just got tired of reading people's unhelpful advice telling new clipless riders that they should just try harder.
    You and other new clipless riders should just try harder.

    TenSpeed is 100% on point. Man up like a red blooded American male, figure **** out, deal with it, and learn to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    You take something that is a proven product, the SPD pedal, and you modify it. Why hasn't this been done in the past? No need to. You learn how to unclip, plain and simple. Just like you learn to ride a bike, the muscle memory will get you unclipped. In other words, you don't reinvent the wheel, especially when your modified pedal is questionably safe at best. Shimano has been making the SPD pedals how long now? You would think that they would have it just about right by now, right?

    Shoe interference was the biggest hinderance for me. I have a pair of Shimano MTB shoes that have 0 clearance issues. I bought a pair of casual Chrome brand shoes, and there is all kinds of interference not allowing me to unclip. I should take the Dremel to the sole of the shoe to rectify it really. I have crashed on the road because of it.

    You take the bike out in the yard, or a grassy area, and you ride around, and practice unclipping. We all have done it. We all more than likely, have also fallen because of it the first time out. My now ex wife fell in the yard the first day, hell she barely made it out into the yard before she fell. I fell on my first trail ride. After that, I never crashed or fell due to the fact that I couldn't get unclipped. You train your brain to remember that you are clipped in, and that you need to unclip when you come to a stop. Just like you have to take your foot off the pedal. You had to learn how to do that.

    If my post comes across as condescending, I won't apologize. You simply gave up, and are trying to figure out a way to bypass learning how to do it. Lets call it for what it is.
    Sure... let's call it what it is... a troll post.

    If you can say that you have never modified a "proven product" to better meet your needs, then you ain't much of a red blooded American male

  32. #32
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    So you are calling me a troll? This is going to get interesting.

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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    So you are calling me a troll? This is going to get interesting.

    Jim bo,

    The other posters have tried to be nice by giving you advice and you respond to their comments with anger and insults. It is clear that you are not a very bright person (regardless of the halfassed and probably unsafe modifications you have figured out how to do). I understand that as a person who's brain does not operate on the same level as most people, your natural reaction to someone giving you advice is to believe they are insulting you. And in turn, you act on your ill thought out and confused beliefs and respond with insults because it is the only way you know how to deal with a confusing situation.

    The other posters were not attempting to be insulting. I am.

    You believe you are an innovator. In fact, all you have done is created a solution to a problem that does not exist. Or at least a solution to a problem that did not exist until you created it. There is a difference between fixing a legitimate issue and what you have done. You have essentially damaged the structural and mechanical integrity of a product because you refuse or fail to learn how to use it properly.

    Because of your actions, I have created a list of things similar to what you have done.

    1. Buying a camelbak, removing the bladder and using the bag to hold a water bottle. "Hey guys, I have invented a solution to the water bottle cage!"

    2. You want a new pair of shorts. Instead, you buy a pair of jeans and cut the legs off and tell everyone how innovative you are.

    3. Peeing in your own mouth because you a thirsty and all the clean dishes are in the dishwasher.
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  34. #34
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    Re: Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Quote Originally Posted by p_h View Post
    Jim bo,

    The other posters have tried to be nice by giving you advice and you respond to their comments with anger and insults. It is clear that you are not a very bright person (regardless of the halfassed and probably unsafe modifications you have figured out how to do). I understand that as a person who's brain does not operate on the same level as most people, your natural reaction to someone giving you advice is to believe they are insulting you. And in turn, you act on your ill thought out and confused beliefs and respond with insults because it is the only way you know how to deal with a confusing situation.

    The other posters were not attempting to be insulting. I am.

    You believe you are an innovator. In fact, all you have done is created a solution to a problem that does not exist. Or at least a solution to a problem that did not exist until you created it. There is a difference between fixing a legitimate issue and what you have done. You have essentially damaged the structural and mechanical integrity of a product because you refuse or fail to learn how to use it properly.

    Because of your actions, I have created a list of things similar to what you have done.

    1. Buying a camelbak, removing the bladder and using the bag to hold a water bottle. "Hey guys, I have invented a solution to the water bottle cage!"

    2. You want a new pair of shorts. Instead, you buy a pair of jeans and cut the legs off and tell everyone how innovative you are.

    3. Peeing in your own mouth because you a thirsty and all the clean dishes are in the dishwasher.
    100% Awesome.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    Sure... let's call it what it is... a troll post.

    If you can say that you have never modified a "proven product" to better meet your needs, then you ain't much of a red blooded American male
    Please explain how potentially damaging a product to make it easier because you refuse to own up to the fact that you lack the skills to use the product the way it was intended to be used, and refuse to practice to develop those skills, makes you a red-blooded American male?

    I thought that being determined to learn to use said product would be more indicative. Or possibly developing an entirely new product that reflects a new way of thinking about the problem.

    This endeavor has "home mechanic syndrome" written all over it.

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    Re: Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    This endeavor has "home mechanic syndrome" written all over it.
    I believe its correct anachronism is: Home Mechanic Obsessive Syndrome.

    Or HO.M.O.S for short.

  37. #37
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    Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Quote Originally Posted by p_h View Post
    Jim bo,

    The other posters have tried to be nice by giving you advice and you respond to their comments with anger and insults. It is clear that you are not a very bright person (regardless of the halfassed and probably unsafe modifications you have figured out how to do). I understand that as a person who's brain does not operate on the same level as most people, your natural reaction to someone giving you advice is to believe they are insulting you. And in turn, you act on your ill thought out and confused beliefs and respond with insults because it is the only way you know how to deal with a confusing situation.

    The other posters were not attempting to be insulting. I am.

    You believe you are an innovator. In fact, all you have done is created a solution to a problem that does not exist. Or at least a solution to a problem that did not exist until you created it. There is a difference between fixing a legitimate issue and what you have done. You have essentially damaged the structural and mechanical integrity of a product because you refuse or fail to learn how to use it properly.

    Because of your actions, I have created a list of things similar to what you have done.

    1. Buying a camelbak, removing the bladder and using the bag to hold a water bottle. "Hey guys, I have invented a solution to the water bottle cage!"

    2. You want a new pair of shorts. Instead, you buy a pair of jeans and cut the legs off and tell everyone how innovative you are.

    3. Peeing in your own mouth because you a thirsty and all the clean dishes are in the dishwasher.
    ^^ this!

    What i do not understand from the OP is that he posted an opinion and expected responses to go along with his opinion and since nobody has agreed to his opinion everybody else are ignorant and are trolls?

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    After riding the Click'rs for a couple hundred miles, I bought a new bike and had some XTs thrown into the deal. I took them out and was not comfortable on them at all. I understand that they are not that hard to get out of.... when you try to get out correctly. But when there is something unexpected, reflexes don't move my foot in the right direction. Muscle memory has to be developed. I just don't want to get bruised up trying to develop the muscle memory.

    With the modified pedal, I don't have the anxiety of the pending fall over. So, I can ride the way I rode with my platforms with the confidence that I can get my foot to the ground quickly as a reflex action. As muscle memory develops, I'm sure I'll be cranking up the spring tension.
    What you're really saying is that you're a pu$$y.

  39. #39
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    People often start mtb not realizing it is an advanced discipline of cycling. They just go out and expect to learn by trial and error. They really need to work on cycling skills on pave. It is similar with SPDs; folks throw them on the bike and simply expect to work through the learning period.

    What is needed is practice outside of the mtb experience. Neither new mtb'ers or folks new to SPDs want to do that. They just want to mountain bike and click-in like the skilled riders. They don't want to limit themselves in any way. They give you a bunch of reasons, complain about the machine, or try to build work-arounds but....

    In the last 15 years I coached kids and teens developing them into racers. They are captive and must act within perimeters. Teaching mtb to this group is dream; they listen, understand rehearsal, and have far fewer injuries. They develop deep skills and become assets and role models to the other newer riders. Teaching adults is much harder as they want to do what they want to do. The result is broken wrists, collarbones and such, which they have twisted into badges of honor.

    So adults ask for "tips and tricks," a "better tire", higher front bar positions......


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    Making SPD pedals easier to use

    OP, you probably need to find another hobby if your afraid of getting bruises. Just sayin..........

  41. #41
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    Jimbo your mod was smart. It gets you the really easy release and maybe when you become more comfortable with pedals, the springs go back in. Can't do that with the clicker. Personally I can't ride flats much. I need free float that an SPD provides. 5:10 and Straightline AMP pedals don't provide that. Plus I ride lots of pretty steep long climbs in Whistler where I live. Like See Colours and Puke. 2k long and 300 metres elevation gain. 15% ave grade but there are steeper bits and a few flatter bits. Clipped in is much more efficient.

  42. #42
    The White Jeff W
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post

    So, I can ride the way I rode with my platforms with the confidence that I can get my foot to the ground quickly as a reflex action.

    So what is the point of using the clipless pedals then? Why dont you just stick with flats?
    No moss...

  43. #43
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    I have rebuilt pedals from the bare parts and installed those springs. That's one of the absolute worst things you can ever do as far as maintenance/repair. It's such a PITA to get the spring back in the hole and one of those things you don't even wish on your enemies. Due to this, I'd NEVER EVER take one out that I thought I might need again in the future, it's not worth it. $100 isn't even enough $$$ to make me do it (even if I was still a shop mech).

    With that said, I think the OP needs to practice a lot more before hitting the trail on clipless pedals. The first time he becomes just slightly airborne and the bike drops away because the pedal tension is so loose will seal the deal. When he goes to try and find the pedal it will be in a different position and next thing you know...BAM.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    Re: Making SPD pedals easier to use

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The first time he becomes just slightly airborne and the bike drops away because the pedal tension is so loose will seal the deal. When he goes to try and find the pedal it will be in a different position and next thing you know...BAM.
    I guess the good news is that this pedal mod will likely limit both his future cycling and reproductive capabilities.

  45. #45
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    Unfortunately the attitude of the OP is also held by those individuals who sanitize tech sections of trail so they can clean it without learning how to ride at a higher level.
    Here is the thing about equality, everyone's equal when they're dead. - Gavroche, Les Misérables

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by someoldfart View Post
    Jimbo your mod was smart. It gets you the really easy release and maybe when you become more comfortable with pedals, the springs go back in. Can't do that with the clicker. Personally I can't ride flats much. I need free float that an SPD provides. 5:10 and Straightline AMP pedals don't provide that. Plus I ride lots of pretty steep long climbs in Whistler where I live. Like See Colours and Puke. 2k long and 300 metres elevation gain. 15% ave grade but there are steeper bits and a few flatter bits. Clipped in is much more efficient.
    I agree with the efficiency... that's one reason why I wanted to switch to clipless.

    I used 5:10 impact shoes on platform pedals. The shoe stuck to the pedal like glue and it was roomy enough inside that I had float in the interface between my foot and the shoe vice the shoe and the pedal. But the shoes were heavy and I was constantly trying to adjust to get my foot in the right spot on the pedal. Clipless fixes that and riding with lower spring tension isn't any more dangerous than riding with platforms with respect to my foot accidentally coming off of the pedal.

    I agree... as comfort level increases, so will spring tension. This just allows me more flexibility.


    I wonder why no one here is disparaging Shimano for coming out with the MT50 pedal. It is advertised to be 60% easier to come out of than an SPD. Well, after removing half the springs, my pedals are 50% easier to come out of than SPD. But I see no one telling Shimano that they are not rocket scientists... that they just need to suck it up and try harder... or any of the other comments I have read here.

    Shimano recognized that a good progression would be MT50s to SPDs. This seems logical and reasonable... but it involves buying two sets of pedals vice one. I simply made a mod that would allow for the same training progression as marketed by Shimano... but with only buying one set of pedals. I guess that makes me irresponsible?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I have rebuilt pedals from the bare parts and installed those springs. That's one of the absolute worst things you can ever do as far as maintenance/repair. It's such a PITA to get the spring back in the hole and one of those things you don't even wish on your enemies. Due to this, I'd NEVER EVER take one out that I thought I might need again in the future, it's not worth it. $100 isn't even enough $$$ to make me do it (even if I was still a shop mech).
    This mod took me every bit of 30 minutes to do. And 15 minutes of that was studying the pedal to see what to do. On one of the spring removals, I pulled the pin too far. I ended up with both springs and the adjustment screw on the table. This is as fully disassembled as they can get. But it only took me a couple of extra minutes to reassemble them from this state. I'm really not sure why it was so difficult for you. I had no trouble at all.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13 View Post
    So what is the point of using the clipless pedals then? Why dont you just stick with flats?
    See above post. Heavy shoes... constantly adjusting foot position... less efficient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Learux View Post
    Jimbo nice mod but after 10 hours of practicing you will have confidence in the pedals.

    Unfortunately yours are lacking the tension that allow for good riding. I suggest you put that spring back in.

    Depending on situation clipping out unwanted can be as bad (if not worse) as not being able to clip out when you desire.

    Stay on paved trails and you will be fine!
    I agree... practice will result with greater confidence. But I disagree that my lower spring tension makes my pedals lacking in tension that allows for good riding. I did a quick 12 mile ride yesterday and they performed perfectly. They were very much like the MT50s that I used, but they are lighter and have more clearance.

    I agree that unwanted uncliping is bad. I don't, however, see that as a problem given that I am coming off of long term platform use. Even with my lower spring tension, my foot is far more planted to the pedal than it was on platforms. Therefore, I didn't compromise safety... I increased safety.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kazlx View Post
    As far as being a post to help new riders, it isn't. If it works for you for whatever reason, then fine, but this isn't a 'mod' that should be encouraged to new riders. There really is a learning curve for most people to learn to ride clipless pedals. They work a certain way for a reason.
    Well, I disagree with you and apparently Shimano disagrees with you. My XT pedals now perform almost identically to the MT50s. Is shimano irresponsible for selling MT50s? And what is the reason for the way they work? How about crank brothers, who everyone says makes pedals that are far easier to unclip than SPDs (I haven't tried them... just repeating what I have heard). Are their pedals wrong? I don't think so. I think there is a wide range for a reason.

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