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  1. #1
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    Lower back soreness

    My lower back gets sore / tight about an hour into an intense ride. It doesn't stop me from riding longer, but I'm looking for recommendations - stretches, lifts, working on sitting and bike posture to help with it.

  2. #2
    Nothing seems to kill me
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    There is a lower back pain discussion over in Fifty + right now with some good advice.
    Hello, my name is human and I came down from the stars.

  3. #3
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    General BS: strengthen your core. Make sure your bike "fits" in such a way as to maximize handling without folding you in half or setting upright in beach cruiser position.

    My experience working with a sport-oriented chiropractor/ physical therapist helped a lot.
    Thorn in your Sidewall
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  4. #4
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    There is a lower back pain discussion over in Fifty + right now with some good advice.
    You forgot the link.

    Low back pain
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  5. #5
    Nothing seems to kill me
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    Didn't forget, just lazy.....and my back hurts..
    Hello, my name is human and I came down from the stars.

  6. #6
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    Surprisingly, many "low back" aches are often the kidneys complaining. Be sure you are getting enough water, and avoid foods that disagree with kidney function.

    Is Your Back Pain Kidney Related

  7. #7
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    I have this issue when my bike fit is off - usually for me that means the bars are too low or too far away, the seat is too high or too far back, or some combination of these issues. When I was younger I didn't notice bike fit issues nearly as much, and rode stuff for a long time that was poorly fitting.

    Of course fitness is the other major issue, and I find yoga practice regularly helps a lot for stretching and strengthening. Best thing to do is find a local class with a good instructor and attend a few classes, enough to develop your own practice at home with good form.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    Didn't forget, just lazy.....and my back hurts..
    Ive got a weak back, I hurt it about a week back.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  9. #9
    U sayin' Bolt ?
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    Low hips, muscles engaged down the back and the interior of your legs from your glutes all the way to keeping the arches of your feet strong. Shoulders wide, strong and loose, not hunched forward. Swimming does wonders to strengthen and create awareness in the torso and hips.

    Try an easier gear to work on form, one bad torque on a hard gear can light those low back muscles up.

  10. #10
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    Thanks all. All good stuff. I think keeping good form is big as I may arch my lower back when fatigue gets in. I'm also going to work on lifts like deadlifts and flexibility as I probably have an imbalance.

  11. #11
    Keep on Rockin...
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    Many different kinds of back pain but what you describes best fits the muscle fatigue pain/tightness.

    Its typical when you are pushing it hard on a bike for a while but you are not in great shape just yet. I'm guessing the pain/tightness makes you want to stand up straight and arch your back to relieve the tension.

    Riding more will fix it, but that takes some time. The quickest way I got my back in shape was doing dead lifts and straight leg dead lifts. The straight legs not only strengthen but also stretch. Beware of those lifts however. You can injure yourself if not done correctly.

  12. #12
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    Because this specifically seems muscle related due to time+intensity I'm going to make a free/silly/easy recommendation to try and see if it helps. Do a standard plank (toes on the ground like you're doing a pushup, elbows on the ground supporting weight, back straight) for a while. Start with 30 seconds, work up to 90 seconds. For variations, rotate yourself 90 degrees one direction or the other and plank off the side of your foot and one arm, the switch. These simple core exercises almost completely eliminated the pain I experienced on longer rides that was muscle related. If it helps you, you're off easy, if it doesn't, it certain hasn't hurt you or cost anything. I do my planks while I'm waiting for the coffee maker to brew first thing in the morning.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Because this specifically seems muscle related due to time+intensity I'm going to make a free/silly/easy recommendation to try and see if it helps. Do a standard plank (toes on the ground like you're doing a pushup, elbows on the ground supporting weight, back straight) for a while. Start with 30 seconds, work up to 90 seconds. For variations, rotate yourself 90 degrees one direction or the other and plank off the side of your foot and one arm, the switch. These simple core exercises almost completely eliminated the pain I experienced on longer rides that was muscle related. If it helps you, you're off easy, if it doesn't, it certain hasn't hurt you or cost anything. I do my planks while I'm waiting for the coffee maker to brew first thing in the morning.
    This is spot on, weak core will give you back pain as you fatigue. Planks, crunches, leg lifts, knee raises all will help. Also deadlifts are great but not meant to do as reps, most lifting coaches tend to teach to not go over 6 reps per set, it is not a muscle group designed for repeated movement with load. That is why it is super beneficial to work on your core to help offset the workload on the lower back. Doing deadlifts at least 2 times per week helps keep you focused on the correct form, if you are not consistent with them would highly recommend averting this lift.

  14. #14
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    Just by chance do you have a sway in your back? When you stand, are you standing straight up? My back has a sway to it. After a few months working the core in the gym my posture improved a lot. My lower back pain also went away.

    Stopped going to the gym and guess what? Lower back pain- really just a dull ache, has returned.

    Those guys up there that recommended planks, & leg lifts, etc. are spot on.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Do a standard plank (toes on the ground like you're doing a pushup, elbows on the ground supporting weight, back straight) for a while. Start with 30 seconds, work up to 90 seconds.
    This is exactly what my chiro had me doing from day one, plus a lot of other exercises. My back pain started fading away when I was doing 60 seconds x 3 front, left, and right every day. Only after I stopped doing this religiously has the back pain started creeping back in.
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  16. #16
    because GIANT
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    pick things up and put them down.

    all the weight advice is good



    so...>>core work<-- is the ticket
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  17. #17
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    Flat pedal can really work over your hamstrings, and grab up into the pelvis which can make lower back super tight w/o stretches...try clipless for a stretch till you're back in riding shape
    All barks have been rendered into english...

  18. #18
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    I don't know anything about back problems but my advice is to lift weights with good form and put more spacers under your stem and to maybe not ride so hard until things improve.

    Hope you figure it out.
    "You can be clipped in and be boring or ride flats and have a good time." - Sam Hill

  19. #19
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    Can't wait for this kidney stone to pass.
    \(_o)/

  20. #20
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    This could be unrelated, but for a long time, I kept moving my handlebar up and my saddle back to make my bike more "comfortable." I had a slack seat tube angle already, then put a 25mm setback post and ended up with 25mm or so under my stem and a 25mm riser bar. I am 5'9" and riding medium sized hardtails. It never got too bad, but I was slowly moving my bike into beach cruiser position.

    This made the default position on my bike sitting upright, as it took a bit of effort to stand up and shift my weight forward into an athletic stance. This was "comfortable" put put a lot of weight on my lower back and forced all my pedaling effort into one set of leg muscles. This is on a singlespeed, which means I need to stand up to pedal quite often. When I realized this and corrected it with exercise and rethinking how my bike fits, the old stance just seems absurd. Now I have a shorter stem, but the grips are much lower and the seat is more forward.

    So when I hear people say to raise your bars, I think that might be a good temprary solution if you body is still strong and able to handle an athletic position for riding and you just need to do so temporarily for recovery. Long term, however, it could hurt you, as I did for me. YMMV.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Can't wait for this kidney stone to pass.
    You no how fix that. Socky, forky 15 dolla bushings deadlift long time; )
    All barks have been rendered into english...

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