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  1. #51
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    BTW, the Tube Tarp is really a must; your tube will get damaged if you carry it in this config long enough so my recommendo is to use the tube tarp and probably splurge every year or so on a new, $7 tube. for me, it is about aesthetics to some degree and light weight. Agree with a post above...a seat bag on a really nice lightweight bike just doesn't look right.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  2. #52
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    I got mine a couple weeks ago. No way anything is falling out I carry a tube, lever and mini pump. Its way lighter and actually holds more then the old seat bag it replaced. Also have the tulbag which holds all my other tools and fits nicely in a jersey pocket or into a camelbak.

    Only complaint is shipping from Backcountry took almost 2 weeks. I guess they are behind due to there success.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan4jeepin View Post
    Only complaint is shipping from Backcountry took almost 2 weeks. I guess they are behind due to there success.
    It may take 1-2 weeks because they make your product when they receive your order, queued up in batches of production for similar products. This relatively short wait is the trade off for having so many options of colors and styles offered by a small company, as opposed to offering only generic black for example, in which case they could probably have inventory on hand almost all the time.
    Nuke the entire site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

  4. #54
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    I just got back from a trip out west. I was gonna do a blog post (still might) about doing all eight rides without a pack. I hate wearing a pack. Some of the rides were of little consequence, while others required some planning. On the longer days that started high (cold) I wore a sleeveless jersey, undershirt, baggies, knee warmers and a hat. I carried a light Gore-Tex coat (wrapped in a Tube Tarp) strapped to the top tube with a Mutherload in case things went bad.



    I also wore a pair of Giro New Road bibs with pockets in the back. Between that and the jersey, I was able to carry an Olympus TG-3 camera, enough food and water for hours (one bottle in a jersey pocket), a Tülbag with all my essentials, and a Sawyer water filter...



    still leaving enough room for me to stow the hat and knee warmers away when it got warmer.



    I felt like I had everything I needed. Chain tool/spoke wrench combo, spare link, Gorilla tape, tire boot, tire plug, 4,5,6mm allen wrenches (plus an adapter for 8mm), $20, tube, tire lever, mini-pump, CO2 and inflator.

    The Race 3 is an improvement over the 2, in that it's much more user friendly (harder to screw up when mounting). I always run the Tube Tarp now and have very little issues with contamination, although I only have a tube, tire lever, and CO2 back there.
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  5. #55
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    I was wondering when Dicky was going to post on here. I first heard about the Awesome Strap on your blog.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatshowiroll View Post
    I was wondering when Dicky was going to post on here. I first heard about the Awesome Strap on your blog.
    I have people...

    Honestly, whenever this topic comes up, I'll chime in. I have many packs, wear them when I have to, dread when I do. Anything I can do to help people get the fact they may be able to live without the monkey on their back.
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  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by velo99 View Post
    I use a skater backpack with a laptop slot for my water bladder. Has lots of nifty pockets for my stuff. I have used it from pretty much day one and I am used to it. Nice thing is I can carry lots of extra water and snacks without worrying where it will ride on longer ventures. I don't carry a ton of stuff normally. Just the tool kit, extra water bottle, and tire repair stuff.
    I prefer real tools instead of a multi tool. I had a RD failure and my tools saved the day. My nephew looked at it and said You`re screwed without real tools. I carry a 6"crescent wrench, smallish lineman`s pliers. three full sized allen wrenches, 15 mm combination wrench, screwdriver, spoke wrench and a chainbreaker. Not a bunch of stuff but more capable than a multi tool when it comes to more than a minor breakdown. Also have a RD hanger and a few RD parts.
    Your lucky that you can carry all that stuff without it bothering you. I'd be so annoyed and probably get a sore back pretty fast. Someone said "monkey on the back"...it feels like it to me.

  8. #58
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    I use a skater backpack with a laptop slot for my water bladder. Has lots of nifty pockets for my stuff. I have used it from pretty much day one and I am used to it. Nice thing is I can carry lots of extra water and snacks without worrying where it will ride on longer ventures. I don't carry a ton of stuff normally. Just the tool kit, extra water bottle, and tire repair stuff.
    I prefer real tools instead of a multi tool. I had a RD failure and my tools saved the day. My nephew looked at it and said You`re screwed without real tools. I carry a 6"crescent wrench, smallish lineman`s pliers. three full sized allen wrenches, 15 mm combination wrench, screwdriver, spoke wrench and a chainbreaker. Not a bunch of stuff but more capable than a multi tool when it comes to more than a minor breakdown. Also have a RD hanger and a few RD parts.
    The bike doesn't make you go fast.
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  9. #59
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    Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!

    I just ordered mine. Did the bundle pack and now the wait begins. I've heard shipping is slow, so at least the expectation is set LOL


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  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by pitbullandmtb View Post
    I just ordered mine. Did the bundle pack and now the wait begins. I've heard shipping is slow, so at least the expectation is set LOL


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    Cool! I ordered mine on July 14th. They got build on July 29th and shipped on the 31st. Then it tool 14 business days to get shipped here to Canada (looong wait) but that is not really the company's fault. You can probably pay extra for express shipping if you want. I get the feeling that the company is only one guy.

  11. #61
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    I was going to order a couple of these. Looks like they are out of stock on virtually everything? I'm transitioning into going packless, and a saddle bag is the last missing puzzle. I'd really like to try one of these. I'm also picking up a Barfly coffee bag strap tomorrow to try out as well.

    Bar Fly Hopper Saddle Bag ? Tate Labs

  12. #62
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    Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!

    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    I was going to order a couple of these. Looks like they are out of stock on virtually everything? I'm transitioning into going packless, and a saddle bag is the last missing puzzle. I'd really like to try one of these. I'm also picking up a Barfly coffee bag strap tomorrow to try out as well.

    Bar Fly Hopper Saddle Bag ? Tate Labs
    Looks good. Can't wait to hear your review.


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  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiretracks View Post
    Its a Mountain Lion knife.
    That. As for myself, I carry a survival knife with flint , both for protection and survival, also food, flashlight , first aid kit, ul tarp ... all in my Camelbak for those day-long rides in the middle of nowhere.

    I often ride at places where there are no cell towers and sometime the only way to a fast evac in case of emergency is by heli. Hell, I'm out in the woods and alone, for me it's an insurance. With that stuff I tip the odd in my favor to make it out alive in case anything happens. Oh and you should see the smile of people I helped because I had exactly what they needed a that time.

    Sure when out for a loop at the local trails , this strap would be enough, but we just duct tape our stuff to seatpost :-)

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by pitbullandmtb View Post
    Looks good. Can't wait to hear your review.


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    Just picked it up today from Backcountry.com. Looks to be well made. I like the adjustability of the strap for different sized loads. I have a 29er tube, Crank bros multi tool and a tire lever on there and had to shorten the strap almost all the way. This is good, since that means I can carry much more stuff if needed. I also like the vertical strap, as it shields the tube from the seat tube (bolts). I have a Thomson and the strap rests right on the back bolt, protecting the tube.

    I would still like to try the BR straps, though.

    Hey Dicky, get your sponsor to stock some more!


  15. #65
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    Went on a 20-miler this morning with some bone jarring descents. The Barfly straps held everything well in place and nothing moved through the whole ride. Nice product.

    I also ordered some BR Race 3 straps today, as they just became available again. I'll be testing them out as soon as they're received.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    I throw it in my bag because it weighs nothing, and fits next to my tube in the main part of my pouch without taking up any space... And I use it.

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    Keeping an open knife next to my tube would not end well for me when I needed that tube. That's just my luck.

  17. #67
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    It's not an open knife and its not touching my tube. It has a cover, and there's a separate panel that it fits into, and it has no contact with the tube. Only thing touching my tube is a zip lock bag with bandaids and other first aid stuff.

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  18. #68
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    Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!

    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Just picked it up today from Backcountry.com. Looks to be well made. I like the adjustability of the strap for different sized loads. I have a 29er tube, Crank bros multi tool and a tire lever on there and had to shorten the strap almost all the way. This is good, since that means I can carry much more stuff if needed. I also like the vertical strap, as it shields the tube from the seat tube (bolts). I have a Thomson and the strap rests right on the back bolt, protecting the tube.

    I would still like to try the BR straps, though.

    Hey Dicky, get your sponsor to stock some more!

    I see the tool and the tube, what's the orange thing? Is that the Backcountry bag?


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  19. #69
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    What am I missing here? What's the difference between this strap and a seat pack. Besides the fact that the pack keeps everything secure and worry free.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!-image.jpg  

    Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!-image.jpg  

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  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    What am I missing here? What's the difference between this strap and a seat pack. Besides the fact that the pack keeps everything secure and worry free.
    Exately. And it looks a lot better in my opinion. I always hated the look of a seat pack but the strap looks badass. Not a big issue for some people but it means a lot to me.

  21. #71
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    The orange object is a tire lever. It's not the BR strap, but from Barfly (see post 61). I've got 3 BR straps on order, though.

    I like the strap idea over the bag. Weight difference is negligible, so not an advantage there. But it does help to keep he weight low. For instance, my last saddle bag had tube, tools, lever, but also few chain links, derailer hanger, presta/schrdaer adapter, change (yes, coins) and other doo dads. Some of you may say some of that stuff is needed. I think back to my years in mountain biking (1997 to now), and have not used anything other than tubes, tire lever and some Allen wrenches. In fact, I am going to replace that multi tool (15 tools or something like that) with a Blackburn

    Also allows me to see exactly what I've got back there. I've assumed I had a tube in the seat bag before only to realize I had used it the prior ride.

    Anyway, it's all preference. Use what you like.

  22. #72
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    Lol so basically the advantage is that you're now less prepared to handle a mechanical failure?

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  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    Lol so basically the advantage is that you're now less prepared to handle a mechanical failure?

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    Huh? I use the strap, its 100% secure, and I am 100% ready for a mechanical. I carry a tube, CO2, and a lever in the strap and carry the rest in my Tul Bag in my jersey pocket. This includes a chain tool, quick link, extra CO2, tire boot, and the assorted allen/Torx wrenches. What else do you need?
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  24. #74
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    Phsycle said that he can't carry as much as he could in a saddle bag, and that's a feature to him.

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  25. #75
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    He also said this-



    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Anyway, it's all preference. Use what you like.

  26. #76
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    I would hope it's all preference. Otherwise there's way too many rules in mtbing

    I do understand preference. I don't understand the strap is all. It carries less, it's not as portable from seat to seat, and gets what **** you can carry dirty.. And you have to strap bags to the strap to carry smaller things. I'll never understand it I guess. I just found it funny that he said that one of its drawbacks was a feature. It's like saying your broken car will get you less speeding tickets.

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  27. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    I would hope it's all preference. Otherwise there's way too many rules in mtbing

    I do understand preference. I don't understand the strap is all. It carries less, it's not as portable from seat to seat, and gets what **** you can carry dirty.. And you have to strap bags to the strap to carry smaller things. I'll never understand it I guess. I just found it funny that he said that one of its drawbacks was a feature. It's like saying your broken car will get you less speeding tickets.

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    This. ^^^

    Just another gimmick that makes one feel cool. A seat pack does everything a strap does and more. It keeps things secure and worry free.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  28. #78
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    Don't make me repeat myself...

    Who's the crazy one here?
    What am I missing here? What's the difference between this strap and a seat pack. Besides the fact that the pack keeps everything secure and worry free.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!-image.jpg  

    Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!-image.jpg  

    Front Range, Colorado.

  29. #79
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    I feel like I'd be less inclined to even take out my tool knowing I had to repack everything I brought with me. Luckily I brought less lol

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  30. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Who's the crazy one here?
    What am I missing here? What's the difference between this strap and a seat pack.
    Quite a bit of difference between the examples you posted, but I agree there's not much difference between the awesome strap and a small seat pack that straps up tight to the seat rails.

    I'm OK with the "kitchen sink" travelers and only poke a little good natured fun at their overloaded backpacks, why admonish those who choose to be minimalists?

  31. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Quite a bit of difference between the examples you posted, but I agree there's not much difference between the awesome strap and a small seat pack that straps up tight to the seat rails.

    I'm OK with the "kitchen sink" travelers and only poke a little good natured fun at their overloaded backpacks, why admonish those who choose to be minimalists?
    I agree the seat pack example I used isn't the one I would choose. But in a hurry that's all I could find for an example. I'd find one that fit closer up to the saddle. And no I'm not putting down ones choice in being a minimalist. I just don't get the raves on this trap technique when a seat pack does everything the strap does and so much more.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  32. #82
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    +1, I'm with dirt junkie on this one. Can't understand what is "dorkey" about a seat bag. It holds your gear, keeps it clean, and allows you to retrieve one item without having to repack everything. I'd choose practical and functional every time. Personally I think a small seat bag is aesthetically pleasing in keeping with a neat and streamlined look.

  33. #83
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    http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item...647922&alt=web

    This is by far my favorite saddle bag I've ever owned. It holds everything in compartments so I don't have to dig I can just grab one thing if I need it. Plus it holds so much stuff.

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  34. #84
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    You have to consider the strap part of a system where you also use the Tul Bag for your small bits . For me it's just different and I like different. This is really great for racing where you only really need a tube and CO2.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  35. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    ... Plus it holds so much stuff.
    That's exactly the point I was trying to make. When I use a saddle bag, I tend to carry more than I need. In fact, when I used a Camelbak, I carried all sorts of junk. The minimalist approach I take physically limits myself in bringing any more than necessary. Again, in my years of MTBing, I carried waaaaay too much crap. I've looked through everything and found stuff I hadn't ever used. The items strapped to my saddle (shown above) plus a pump on the frame takes care of what I need. I don't need a valve adapter, spoke wrench, chain links, a knife, etc. Again, personal preference tailored to MY needs.

    The strap seems to be working out for me. The great thing about the strap is that you can size it up or down. I have a small saddle bag that won't fit a tube AND a multi tool. Medium sized bags work ok, but after I use the tube, I get that clanking around of tools inside of the bag. The strap tightens up, neat and tidy. It can also carry oblong objects that the saddle bag can't.

    There will always be pros and cons, and for me, the pro's win out here. Maybe not for you, but that's what makes us all individuals.

  36. #86
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    The problem with seat bags are that they look like ****! (in my opinion, no offence). I spent a lot of time and money getting my bike to the amazing level of beauty that it is at now (again, in my own opinion). I had a seat bag on there and it threw the whole look of the bike off. The strap is minimal, holds everything need and looks bad ass. I run tubeless and spend a lot (relatively) in between maintaining and cleaning my bike that I usually dont need tools or everything else on my rides. Its been more than two years since I needed anything in my seat bag (or strap). Because of all this, it works great for me.

  37. #87
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    ^^^Sounds like me.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  38. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by matw View Post
    The problem with seat bags are that they look like ****! (in my opinion, no offence). I spent a lot of time and money getting my bike to the amazing level of beauty that it is at now (again, in my own opinion). I had a seat bag on there and it threw the whole look of the bike off. The strap is minimal, holds everything need and looks bad ass. I run tubeless and spend a lot (relatively) in between maintaining and cleaning my bike that I usually dont need tools or everything else on my rides. Its been more than two years since I needed anything in my seat bag (or strap). Because of all this, it works great for me.
    Not to sound negative but no matter how much time you spend maintaining and cleaning your bike on your off bike hours. Any given ride any mishap or breakdown or crash or,or,or can happen. Trust me when your 9 miles from nowhere and you have a catastrophic failure such as a broken chain and your without the essentials to fix it your in a world of hurt.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  39. #89
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    Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!

    After I lost a saddle bag on a trail with about $50 worth of stuff (incl the bag) I decided to get an Awesome Strap. I wrap my tube in a small ziplock back so it won't get abraded by the nylon strap and I carry 2 CO2s and 2 levers and 1 inflator. I have never lost A THING out of my AS and ridden hundreds of miles with it. Plus, I know it won't break like a saddle bag can. Whatever it can't carry I pack in a jersey pocket. One of the best $12 I've spent in mountain biking.

    Edit: I agree with matw on the whole looks thing. Most saddle bags look terrible .

    Please donate to IMBA or your local IMBA chapter. It's trail karma.

  40. #90
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    There seem to be some misconceptions about the strap.

    1) Using a strap does not mean you are unprepared or will be stranded - you can carry other bits that don't fit in your jersey pockets.
    2) The strap is as secure as a saddle bag.
    3) Transferring it between bikes is as easy/fast as a saddlebag. The new Race 3 design is super slick.
    4) The strap works with dropper posts better than a bag.

    Other thoughts:

    1) You can carry more in a larger saddlebag.
    2) The saddlebag will keep your stuff cleaner.
    3) The saddlebag will allow you to take out items without taking them all out.

    I don't break down on the trail...at least not often enough to keep track. I take care of my bike. I run tubeless. I don't ride in the mud. I wear regular jerseys with pockets. In the event of a major breakdown/flat, who cares about taking all your bits out vs. fishing for one item? You are stopped on the side of the trail and at this point, time isn't your major concern.

    I have run a saddle bag and I have run the strap. I like the strap!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  41. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Not to sound negative but no matter how much time you spend maintaining and cleaning your bike on your off bike hours. Any given ride any mishap or breakdown or crash or,or,or can happen. Trust me when your 9 miles from nowhere and you have a catastrophic failure such as a broken chain and your without the essentials to fix it your in a world of hurt.
    Using the strap doesn't mean you don't carry the essentials...I do (in my Tul Bag stuffed in my jersey pocket)!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  42. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    There seem to be some misconceptions about the strap.

    1) Using a strap does not mean you are unprepared or will be stranded - you can carry other bits that don't fit in your jersey pockets.
    2) The strap is as secure as a saddle bag.
    3) Transferring it between bikes is as easy/fast as a saddlebag. The new Race 3 design is super slick.
    4) The strap works with dropper posts better than a bag.

    Other thoughts:

    1) You can carry more in a larger saddlebag.
    2) The saddlebag will keep your stuff cleaner.
    3) The saddlebag will allow you to take out items without taking them all out.

    I don't break down on the trail...at least not often enough to keep track. I take care of my bike. I run tubeless. I don't ride in the mud. I wear regular jerseys with pockets. In the event of a major breakdown/flat, who cares about taking all your bits out vs. fishing for one item? You are stopped on the side of the trail and at this point, time isn't your major concern.

    I have run a saddle bag and I have run the strap. I like the strap!
    You forgot #4 the most important feature of a seat pack over a strap.

    4) A seat pack allows for "stress free" riding without the worry of losing anything.

    Just saying
    Front Range, Colorado.

  43. #93
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    Re: Just got a Backcountry Awesome strap!

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    You forgot #4 the most important feature of a seat pack over a strap.

    4) A seat pack allows for "stress free" riding without the worry of losing anything.

    Just saying
    I take by this comment that you actually haven't held/seen/used one? Absolutely as secure if used correctly as a bag for a tube, lever, and CO2. It has non-slip material on the side that holds the stuff. Nothing is falling out of this...so no..that isn't an advantage of a seat bag.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 09-29-2014 at 03:08 AM.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  44. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    I take by this comment that you actually haven't held/seen/used one? Absolutely as secure if used correctly as a bag for a tube, lever, and CO2. It has non-slip material on the side that holds the stuff. Nothing is falling out of this...so nom..that isn't an advantage of a seat bag.
    Nope never used one. But "as secure if used correctly as a bag" would be an impossibility seeing how it doesn't have the containment of a bag. With a bag there's no way anything is coming out of it unless you leave it unzipped. With a strap the possibility of losing something is ever present. I'm not saying the strap doesn't secure it tight but comparing the two in terms of security there's not a comparison.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  45. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Nope never used one. But "as secure if used correctly as a bag" would be an impossibility seeing how it doesn't have the containment of a bag. With a bag there's no way anything is coming out of it unless you leave it unzipped. With a strap the possibility of losing something is ever present. I'm not saying the strap doesn't secure it tight but comparing the two in terms of security there's not a comparison.
    Would "double bagging" your saddle bag make it more secure? By your definition, "yes." In real-world use? No significant added benefit. Five bumpy rides now on my rigid bike and nothing has moved at all. The strap is secure enough to keep everything in-place.

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    I still don't get it haha.. I'm sorry, I don't think any less of anyone for using one, and i'm a capitalist and think it's great someone thought of something and people are buying it, I'm just not seeing the advantage. The advantages so far are that it holds less, and seems to be as secure as a bag that holds more. So it doesn't seem like there's much advantage, other than people like how it looks and for some reason want to bring less or carry tools on their person.. Which to me is dangerous cause when you fall and your bag full of stuff that doesn't fit in the strap compressed into your body on a fall... That just hurts. I don't carry things in my pockets for that reason alone. Everything goes on the bike so that when I fall I'm not breaking something, or further injuring myself. I'm not saying it's dangerous, but i have fallen with hard objects in my shorts pockets, and been left with bruises the shape and size of the objects in my shorts pockets.

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    Last edited by ou2mame; 09-28-2014 at 11:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post
    Just not a practical solution. Too many small things it can't carry...
    - CO2 chuck
    - Small patches
    - PowerLink
    - Small multi-tool

    So, when you need anything, you're unpacking the wad... then re-situating everything afterward. I get not want a rattle.. but a small rag or paper towel makes great padding - and as a bonus, you can wipe up after your repair.
    I have one and keep the tube in a ziplock bag to keep it from getting a puncture from rocks and crap thrown up by the rear tire. I keep a patch kit in that bag, the c02 chuck screwed on and taped in place on the c02, a powerlink taped in the open space on my tire lever, and the multi tool on one side of the tube (tool, tube, c02).

  48. #98
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    I'm sorry all you "awesome strap" pushers but there hasn't been a single post that gives any advantage over a seat pack. Other than it's "cool looking" and is lighter because it holds less. There is another point I haven't addressed. With a seat pack you pretty much throw what's needed. haphazardly in it. With a strap you have to bundle up a perfect tight little package EVERY time. And in my opinion that sounds like a PITA.

    A breakdown of advantages from a strap to a seat
    pack.

    Strap advantage
    1] Lighter
    2] cool looking
    3] XC race

    Seat pack advantages:
    1] Holds more / makes longer rides possible. Holds food as well as all tools.
    2] Keeps everything dry and mud free.
    3] Stress free of losing anything.
    4] No tight rolled up packing is needed.
    5] No need to carry anything on person / safe.
    6] Always have everything you need in pack.
    Front Range, Colorado.

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    Lately on my normal loop I've been ditching any sort of pack altogether and just slip my spare tube, patch kit and multi-tool in my jersey pockets.

    "Dangerous" as that may be.

  50. #100
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    You are living on the edge.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

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