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  1. #26
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    First ride today ~ 10-12 mi or so. WOW, this thing is comfy! A 750% improvement at least over the WTB V. No pressure anywhere - it's really phenomenally comfortable. Will take a longer ride later this week and see how it is for 2 or 3 hours. So far so good, though - it's like riding a couch!

    Have to say though, I was not impressed looking at the underside of the saddle. It has a quite crude look, even compared with the WTB, which is a fairly inexpensive saddle. For $115, I was expecting a bit higher quality workmanship. So far, that's my only complaint, though.

  2. #27
    rmi
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    Took two night rides the last two nights with my Adamo saddle. I am quite liking it!

    The only thing I find slightly annoying is how far pushed back I have the saddle. I am out of rail, but am finding the most comfortable seating position. The seatpost I have now claims to have about 12mm offset. With how you are supposed to position the saddle, I wish that ISM would have designed the rails differently, so that their saddles can work properly with regular seatposts.

    Hard to complain too much, though. Just for comparison, I rode around on my HT which still has a traditional saddle (that I used to ride every week and not think too much about groin pressure). Wow! To say that the Adamo relieves pressure on your junk is an understatement! I also like how, in my current saddle position, my balls are off the saddle.

    Ryan

  3. #28
    rmi
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    Another update: Went on a 2 hour road ride over the weekend on my HT. Saddle is still very comfortable and I think my sitbones have finally gotten used to bearing all the weight (as opposed to sharing some with my soft tissue).

    One weird thing I did notice before leaving on my ride: I have been a little sore on the right side of my soft tissue area. This soreness kind of felt like muscle soreness and I could also notice it a little in my abdomen. When got on my bike, I realized that it must be from mounting my saddle. I rode 3 times in 3 days last week, all off road. I almost always get on my bike from standing on the left side and swinging my right leg over the saddle. With the snow on the ground, I think I was getting on and off the bike more than usual. I think the extra width of the Adamo was just touching me in an area that I wasn't used to with my old saddles, hence the little soreness. Didn't have any soreness after my two hour ride, but I stayed on the bike for the whole time.

    How's everyone else's Adamo? Still good?

    Ryan

  4. #29
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    This company has a try before you buy plan. For $25 they send you an Adamo Peak seat to try for 7 days. If you like it $20 goes towards the purchase of your seat. If you don't - well you're out $25 but you won't have a seat to offload on someone.......

    http://www.trisports.com/demo-ism-ad...ke-saddle.html

  5. #30
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    I've been riding my adamo's for a while now. I will echo everyone else's sentiments about having to put the seat all the way forward to achieve your riding position--it's a little annoying, but they are trying to comply with saddle length regulations. Although, I can't see anyone putting this brick on their bike for racing...it's a comfy, well designed brick, but a brick none the less. After a little more consideration, I agree with whomever said that an adamo mtb saddle based on the podium would be ideal.
    Formerly known as iceaxe

  6. #31
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    I just went for a 3 hour ride today - have not ridden in 2 weeks due to a facer that bruised a couple of ribs. So my butt was not used to riding every other day. This saddle was still like sitting on nothing. No discomfort at all, even at the end of the day. I've got the saddle set up perfectly for my geometry. I'm 6'2" with a 34" inseam. My saddle is back - I have maybe an inch left on the rails, and is pitched very slightly downward - maybe a 5 degree nose down angle. Absolutely no discomfort whatsoever. I continue to be impressed with this saddle. Well, except for the crappy haphazard stapling job on the seat underside. But, hey, that's splitting hairs at this point.

  7. #32
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    Good for climbing?

    I've seen some advice that a seat with an "enhanced climbing nose" might help me get in a better climbing position. Any thoughts on whither the Adamo fits the bill?

  8. #33
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    I've personally used the Adamo Peak, Racing, Podium and now Time trial saddles. All will give you far more seating versatility than a traditional saddle. I think the podium and breakaway offer the most positions and are the most versatile of the line, even for mtb.
    Formerly known as iceaxe

  9. #34
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    It seems as though everyone who owns a ISM adamo saddle loves it, in contrast to regular saddles, where some people like it and some hate it. I still wonder why it's not that popular. Is it because of limited availability, radical design, weight or something else?

    I'd like to buy a new saddle as well. I've got 3 bikes and all have got Fizik saddles on them. Lately, I've been doing longer rides 3-4 hours and occasionally I still have saddle soreness the day after. I'm no doctor, but that can't be good. This has got to stop. It's time for change. I'm going to order a ISM adamo peak from the interwebs, I think No bike shop in Oslo, Norway here carries this brand.

  10. #35
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    You can't go wrong with this saddle. I think what holds people back is the fear of trying something different. The seat isn't light either, but whatever. It's the best damn seat I've ever purchased. Well worth the money.

  11. #36
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    I made the decision, I ordered the ISM adamo peak in white for 106 EUR including shipping. I probably have to wait a couple of weeks before it arrives, since I have to ship it to my parents' address first and then they can forward it to me. :S

    Can't wait actually My gentleman's area is still recovering from the Fizik Tundra saddle from a ride 2 days ago

  12. #37
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    Absolutely no way I'd let a few grams get in the way of preserving my Master of Ceremonies!

    ISM = Insurance for Sexual Mojo

    Steel is real...Ti is fly...carbon fiber is good for constipation.

  13. #38
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    Any more reviews?

  14. #39
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    I now have the ISM adamo peak for 1 or 2 weeks. It's a lot more comfortable than the Fizik Tundra. It takes a little bit getting used to. I still haven't got it set up correctly. It takes 5 rides or so to get the setup correct. But apparantly then it will be super comfy, but even without the perfect setup: Oh boy, my privates are holding up a lot better on longer rides! I mean A LOT better.

    I think that this saddles requires about 10 to 20 mm more setback than my previous saddle. So I need to get another seatpost with more setback.

  15. #40
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    Setup should be fairly simple on these seats. Use a level to make the rails ll to the ground, and then adjust the fore/aft so that your sit bones rest sit on the slope of the seat (in front of the rearward curve.)

  16. #41
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    Thanks for this post! I checked the Adamo Web site right away and then looked up local bike shops that carry the Adamo brand. Jack & Adams, a specialty shop focused on triathletes, carries them in Austin. I wanted to quickly see what one actually looked like and see if they had any demo saddles, but didn't want to tarry in the store since it was closing time on Saturday evening. I now have an appointment to bring my road bike in Thursday evening. They scheduled an hour to do a free bike fit with the Adamo demo saddle and then will send me off for a week to demo the saddle. How cool is that? If it works for me, they will be happy to order the mountain bike version. These saddles are expensive out the kazoo (from $150-$200) but if they really work, they are worth every penny and I'll have a good bike fit out of it. I held two of them--both had titanium rails; they actually felt quite light.
    Why the road bike? Spend more time just sitting on a road ride, hence more "discomfort" so thought I'd get that sorted out first.

  17. #42
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    i have been using my peak for 12 months now and my butt has no complaints. If you can spend the extra grams of weight then this is it. Another good thing about this saddle is the durability of the seat cover or skin. if you buy a fizik saddle only after a few months of riding the seat cover breaks out, unlike with the adamo.

  18. #43
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    okay guys, i think i've read just about as much as a person can read on all these saddles designed for MALE comfort, if you know what i mean, and i've concluded that the ADAMO is the company most singularly engineering for this aspect. I think Speshy does some nice work in this area too, as well as some other companies, but in the end, ADAMO specializes in this. These reviews helped me choose the saddle.
    I was one who swore off racing/riding after a particularly long and hard 40 mile race on a 29HT. I couldn't feel my junk completely for about a week...TMI, i know. But anyway, bought a nice new 29XC FS this year, and this saddle will, i'm confident, in tandem with my new ride keep me smiling on the trails for many decades to come.
    If this thing works as well as you all said (and i will report back in about 2 weeks), then I can't imagine why anyone would keep with a trad saddle? Oh yeah, I know why, my Fizik Tundra looks damn sexy on my bike. But thinking of this thing as my "stingray" should help. .

  19. #44
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    Went through 4 different seats of various sizes & shapes (about $ 350 later) with no luck, finally ended up with the ism Adamo's on all 3 road bikes. Much better, no more numbness after the 35 mile point for me.

    Chk Craigslist.
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    1991 Cannondale m700

  20. #45
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    Just posted this in another thread; but thought I should also let you all know my opinion on the saddle. Thanks for all your input on here!

    I ordered the Peak and put it on my 29er FS (Giant Anthem) today and rode close to 20 miles on the roughest cross country MI has to offer. It was amazing. The saddle feels exactly like a bike saddle should. There is, of course, no pressure between the legs; your body just sits on the two rear sit bones as God intended. I switched back and forth with my friend's HT and his Fizik saddle (mine's going on ebay) and I just can't see why all bikes aren't fitted with these ergonomic seats. They are perfectly inline with our anatomy. Easily the best, and most important, $100 I've spent on my bike ever. Wish I would have purchased one of these years ago. Do yourself a favor and if you are even contemplating getting a saddle with a cut-out in it - get this one. All the others are okay, but this is the best. Only took 2 adjustments on the trail to get it dialed right in, and it's WAY easier to dial in than a regular saddle. Good luck, Fellas. I'm sure if you go with this thing you will be AMAZED and BEWILDERED as to why everyone doesn't ride one of these. By the way, I was a little concerned before purchasing this that the lack of a real nose would affect the handling on speedy descents. I was blown away that this thing handled out of the seat just like my old saddle; you just get out, pinch a little between your thighs and lay back a bit over the back wheel like normal and it feels no different than any other saddle. As I said, I woulc only encourage everyone to get something like this saddle. I love my Peak Adamo!

  21. #46
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    It speaks well of a company when the Operations Commander (I'd kill for a moniker like that!) gets back to you in less than 24 hours.

    I was enquiring as to best saddle choice (their online selector suggested the Prologue for me, based solely on amount ridden per week), and Dave Bunce replied that he thought the Peak would be the best choice....I wrote that I do a combination of road and trails, am 52, weigh about 100 kg (what's that, around 220, I guess), about 5' 10.5", and do around 25-50 miles per week....as much trail as I can get my hands on, but also a lot of road getting there.

    My only concern is that, after having seen a video on YT re saddle set up, that it sits rather far back relative to most saddles. I already have my cockpit positioning dialed in, and wouldn't want to have to get a new stem to compensate for sitting further back. Is this the case, or is it more optical illusion?
    Also, any problems with the hook on the back, and increased width affecting maneuverability and comfort?

    Ready to pull the trigger on this one...I'm tired of feeling like I've left my junk on the trail after long rides.
    Happy Trails...

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve L. Knievel View Post
    It speaks well of a company when the Operations Commander (I'd kill for a moniker like that!) gets back to you in less than 24 hours.

    I was enquiring as to best saddle choice (their online selector suggested the Prologue for me, based solely on amount ridden per week), and Dave Bunce replied that he thought the Peak would be the best choice....I wrote that I do a combination of road and trails, am 52, weigh about 100 kg (what's that, around 220, I guess), about 5' 10.5", and do around 25-50 miles per week....as much trail as I can get my hands on, but also a lot of road getting there.

    My only concern is that, after having seen a video on YT re saddle set up, that it sits rather far back relative to most saddles. I already have my cockpit positioning dialed in, and wouldn't want to have to get a new stem to compensate for sitting further back. Is this the case, or is it more optical illusion?
    Also, any problems with the hook on the back, and increased width affecting maneuverability and comfort?

    Ready to pull the trigger on this one...I'm tired of feeling like I've left my junk on the trail after long rides.
    From my understanding of these saddles, picture your existing saddle set up just like it is, and cut the nose off. That is how they are positioned. You're losing the nose, but the rest is the same. I went with the Koobi, so I don't know about the Adamo.

  23. #48
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    The rails will land basically in the same place as your regular saddle. If anything, I slid my peak back a bit, not forward.

  24. #49
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    Does anyone think this design would put more pressure on your prostate than a convention saddle?
    Does it force your hips to rotate more forward or back?

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by madamfunk View Post
    Does anyone think this design would put more pressure on your prostate than a convention saddle?
    Does it force your hips to rotate more forward or back?

    You'd be sitting on the base of your hips (sit bones) with this saddle so there is no prostate pressure. I find that the saddle allows me to rotate my hips forward or back on my own. It doesn't push them in one direction or the other. Make sure you set the saddle up correctly though. There are some videos online for the setup. I recently bought the Prologue for my road bike, and it's just as good as my Peak.

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