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  1. #1
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    How to sweat less

    I live in NC and part of the reason I don't like riding in summer is because of the heat causing fatigue and the extra time to shower, dry clothes, get new clothes immediately after each ride. But I rode in 90+ degree heat today and didn't sweat that much for whatever reason. I tend to sweat more once I stop.

    I'm guessing common sense like ride in shade, get in better shape, etc but any other things to help reduce the amount of sweat during and after a ride?

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    Although it hurts in so many ways to say this, I find I sweat less if I don't drink, especially beer, for a few days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokee300 View Post
    Although it hurts in so many ways to say this, I find I sweat less if I don't drink, especially beer, for a few days.
    Interesting - I didn't drink for a few days and had wine instead of beer last time I did.

  4. #4
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    There's a new drug (or a wipe) coming out that stops sweating. Not sure if you'd want to use it all over, it may be just for the pits.

    Gonna Goog to see if I can find it.

    Edit: here it is- https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireSt...ating-56263110
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  5. #5
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    Heatstroke will make you sweat less. Low humidity and relative airspeed will make you think you sweat less.

  6. #6
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    Sweating's a good thing...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    Heatstroke will make you sweat less.
    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    Sweating's a good thing...


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  8. #8
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    Ride in colder climates!

  9. #9
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    Yeah, sweating lets your body cool itself by evaporation, which enhances the heat removal by convection that occurs when you are moving (or a breeze blows).

    Everything else (temperature, humidity, breeze or speed or other airflow) being the same, you will be a lot cooler sweating than not.

    I live in Texas and sweating pretty profusely is unavoidable from March to October, if not year round. On a bike, you sweat pretty good even when it's cold out if you are mildly exerting yourself.

    The real answer for not sweating is avoid heat and don't ride very hard.

    One thing you can do, if you want to avoid having to change dripping clothes, is a cool-down period, where you are going just hard enough to keep that sweat drying. You still might stink and you'll still feel grubby, but you won't have to get in the car dripping or go anywhere dripping.

  10. #10
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    Ride slower. Or move to Arizona, you'll still sweat there but since it instantly evaporates you won't realize it.
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  11. #11
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    Ice in your camelbak and cold drinks too? You sweat to cool down your body, if you can keep it cooler...
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  12. #12
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    Horses have armpits that sweat like those of primates such as humans. Although sweating is found in a wide variety of mammals, relatively few (exceptions include humans and horses) produce large amounts of sweat in order to cool down.

    So maybe reincarnate as something other than a horse or a human...

  13. #13
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    How to sweat less

    And here I was, thinking that the ability to thermoregulate was a good thing.

    Guess I was wrong?


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  14. #14
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    Best thing you can do is keep riding to improve your fitness and acclimate to the heat, what works for me is driving during the day with only my drivers window down and no AC, even in 100 heat.
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  15. #15
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    Ride in your birthday suit (or budgie smugglers, if you're modest) ^^

    Would keep you cool & also be quite liberating ;-)

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    ... I tend to sweat more once I stop...
    Probably sweating just as much riding but it's evaporating faster due to air speed.
    Do the math.

  17. #17
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    Embrace the sweat!

    No, not literally. I don't mean go out and hug a slob but sweating is a normal part of the deal. I'm just home from a ride, pretty soaking in sweat. Jump in the shower, feeling fresh, great feeling.

    Let's say you manage to figure out a way to sweat a bit less, then what? You won't wash after a ride? My guess is either you're not going to get any sort of proper workout or you're gona be one smelly dude!

    Stop moaning, just get on with it ;0)

  18. #18
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    As stated, sweating is one of the ways we regulate temperature through evaporation. When we sweat faster than it evaporates, it piles up on the skin. Mountain biking is so intense at times that you're gonna sweat, especially when it's warm. I find sweating in freezing weather to be more of a problem because it gets cold an clammy, which is more of a concern than being warm and clammy.

    So live with it. Wear a sweatband to keep it out of your eyes. Drink lots of water. Throw your riding clothes in the wash when you get back and take a cool shower to bring your body temp down.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I live in NC and part of the reason I don't like riding in summer is because of the heat causing fatigue and the extra time to shower, dry clothes, get new clothes immediately after each ride. But I rode in 90+ degree heat today and didn't sweat that much for whatever reason. I tend to sweat more once I stop.

    I'm guessing common sense like ride in shade, get in better shape, etc but any other things to help reduce the amount of sweat during and after a ride?
    I'm in Alabama. Humidity is rough. If you aren't sweating, you are currently in the heat stroke stage. Air flow keeps the body cooler and the sweat down when moving. When I stop, the sweat starts like turning on a faucet, and the glasses fog up, instantly. One way I help keep that in check is to keep moving while I take a break. Find a shady hub or open area and just keep coasting around at a walking pace and drink. The rest with air flow on the body makes all the difference. You ain't avoiding the shower, so work it into the plans.

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    ^^^This is a good point. Being damp with sweat in cold weather, or wet from anything, really, can speed up hypothermia. It's important to wear something wicking to keep it off your skin.

    One hot weather trick that I like is to put a wet "do rag" bandana on my head. When things start to get really nasty hot, you can give it a spritz with cool water from your bottle or bag and it's very refreshing and can kind of ward off the heat bonk for a while.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    So live with it.
    Or die without it.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    Yes and yes, ask me how I know.
    How do you know???

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  23. #23
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    there's normal sweat, and then there's hyperhidrosis. some people sweat excessively so much that they can't keep up, no matter how much they drink, and even when they are not working hard or in hot weather. if this is the case, see a doctor.

    otherwise, wear clothes that allow the sweat to wick away and evaporate to keep you cool and dry. where I live, it's hot for most of the year, so it's just a part of riding. I carry a full 3L hydration pack most of the time for a <3 hour ride and usually empty it. sometimes I have to find a drinking fountain to refill. water bottles are out of the question because they don't carry enough water.

    bank5- what do you wear when you ride? any cotton? stick to synthetic materials designed for sweating, or wool. well-made, thin wool does a surprisingly awesome job of keeping you dry and cool.

    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    But I rode in 90+ degree heat today and didn't sweat that much for whatever reason. I tend to sweat more once I stop.
    I wish it was only 90 degrees in central Texas! the truth is that you were probably sweating the whole time, but since you were moving, the sweat was evaporating off your body and cooling you down some. as soon as you stop moving, you continue to sweat, but the sweat builds up because it does not have a breeze pulling it off you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Ride slower. Or move to Arizona, you'll still sweat there but since it instantly evaporates you won't realize it.
    Bet me... had to take my sunglasses into the shower with me after riding yesterday to try and wash some of the sweat off of them. Of course, humidity is up the last few days, and especially yesterday.

    FWIW, I've found that getting a heartrate monitor and keeping an eye on your zones can help control that feeling of exhaustion and mostly avoid going from the 'slightly sweaty' mode into 'buckets of sweat raining from my pores' mode. Yesterday was something like 115 in Phoenix and my dumb ass was riding at around 4pm. My biggest goal was to try and stay in HR zone 3 or 4 (which turned out to be nearly impossible.) But simply stopping, or forcing myself to dial back the exertion as my HR climbed helped to keep things in check and definitely kept the sweat from getting as bad as it could've been had I been redlining it nonstop.

    edit: and since digging for a phone or screwing with a smartwatch isn't super conducive to riding, I just added a Wahoo elemnt bolt to my bike... the top LED row lets me see at a glance what HR zone im in (both by number of lit LEDs, and color) so I can adjust on the fly much more easily. That one feature alone was worth the price of admission for me.

    Biggest thing though is finding that sustainable pace (which can be hard when on varied up/down type terrain) so you can keep moving. The airflow alone makes all the difference in the world to perceived sweat.

  25. #25
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    Not Alaska, was steamy in the 70s and 80s the last few days and sweat pouring like crazy.

    I do find that being lighter and in better shape dramatically reduces the water I need.

    Was riding in Arkansas and Oklahoma a few weeks ago. There is no good ending there.
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  26. #26
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    ...
    wear clothes that allow the sweat to wick away and evaporate to keep you cool and dry. where I live, it's hot for most of the year, so it's just a part of riding. I carry a full 3L hydration pack most of the time for a <3 hour ride and usually empty it. sometimes I have to find a drinking fountain to refill. water bottles are out of the question because they don't carry enough water.

    bank5- what do you wear when you ride? any cotton? stick to synthetic materials designed for sweating, or wool. well-made, thin wool does a surprisingly awesome job of keeping you dry and cool.
    ^ nailed it. I was going to say, I sweat a fair amount, but it doesn't bother me if I am wearing the baggy, thin, synthetic (polyester) shirt that I bought for mountain biking. In fact, everything I wear is synthetic. When I used to wear a cotton t-shirt, all that sweat bugged me because the shirt was so heavy with sweat, and sticking to me. Not that a synthetic shirt is a miracle material that will instantly evaporate sweat in the shade, but they can be comfortable enough that you don't think about it much.

  28. #28
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    Stay cool, dudes.

    How to sweat less-815ea555-6a27-4340-aa69-5872fa965d11_1.d2f507aaca8bad3d1813c6b35c47b36b.jpg
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  29. #29
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    One tip is to take your breaks at the bottom of the hill after your lighter effort instead of the top of the hill immediately after your biggest efforts. It's also ok to take your breaks in the sun if that's were the moving air is... it might even be a bit warmer, but the humidity under the canopy can just about drown you in the NC forest.


    edit..and don't sprint back to the car. Cooling down the last 10 minutes of the ride is good for you for many reasons.

  30. #30
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    Loose weight. Fat people sweat more. Get fitter. Fitter people use less energy riding and sweat less. Ride at night when its cooler.

    Lastly, get a water based sport for when its stupid hot! I kitesurf too and its a glorious thing to do a hard out session in the middle of summer and and finish your session cool and refreshed.

    Also find a swimming spot for the end of your ride. Ride like hell, sweat like a rapist then jump in the water at the he end. Yourl come out refreshed and depending on ow anal you are, you wont need an immediate shower.

  31. #31
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    i dont care, as long as i have plenty of ice cold water. ill pore it all over me, make a mess YES !

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    There's a new drug (or a wipe) coming out that stops sweating. Not sure if you'd want to use it all over, it may be just for the pits.

    Gonna Goog to see if I can find it.

    Edit: here it is- https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireSt...ating-56263110

    That's a cholinesterase inhibitor. It's a human-approved form of ant spray, or VX-nerve gas. Just letting you know...
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  33. #33
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    I run hot and sweat easily, always have, nothing I can do but drink. I even have to skip post-ride beer frequently because I dehydrate easily

    Mid-summer is brutal for me. I'm usually tanked after 45 min, soaked and over-heated if it's hot and humid. Not much I can do.

    Pace definitely helps - if you can get some convection to help evaporate some sweat then you can prolong the inevitable. This usually means climbing slow so as not to work too much and descending slow to prolong the airflow and recovery time. That's no fun though... Just do shorter rides and cool off in between.

    I also find on real hot days it's actually cooler to be on a bike doing moderate paced road rides. MTB, especially in the muggy east, usually means being in the woods and riding and relatively slower average speeds, so you don't get that sweet airflow.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post

    I also find on real hot days it's actually cooler to be on a bike doing moderate paced road rides. MTB, especially in the muggy east, usually means being in the woods and riding and relatively slower average speeds, so you don't get that sweet airflow.
    Two weeks ago in Oklahoma and Arkansas (and Texas before that) when I got out of the A/C car and started riding, for the first 20 minutes it seemed like "yeah, if I keep a moderate pace, don't go too hard, the air-flow will keep me from feeling terrible".

    20 minutes later, you feel terrible.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    One tip is to take your breaks at the bottom of the hill after your lighter effort instead of the top of the hill immediately after your biggest efforts. It's also ok to take your breaks in the sun if that's were the moving air is... it might even be a bit warmer, but the humidity under the canopy can just about drown you in the NC forest.


    edit..and don't sprint back to the car. Cooling down the last 10 minutes of the ride is good for you for many reasons.
    Out my way in Western NC, you won't catch me taking breaks at the bottom of descents. Gross. That's where the thicker forest is, with higher humidity, less air movement, and more bugs. I'll continue to take my breaks at the top where it's mostly more open, more breezy, cooler, and fewer bugs, thanks.

    It has been rather unseasonably warm out here, though. Thankfully cooling off a bit this next week.

    There's not really much you can functionally do to sweat less under certain conditions. It's more about how you manage that sweat. Breezy, wicking clothes are key. As much as riding with a pack is functional, it definitely makes a difference not wearing one on a hot, sticky ride. Find your favorite sweat band. I like the Sweat Gutr, personally. Wear a helmet that vents/breathes well. Swimming holes, yes. I also dial back my ride intensity, or seek better times of day to ride. Morning is cooler, but usually higher humidity. Later evening/nighttime is warmer, but usually lower humidity. So depends on what I'd rather avoid.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Two weeks ago in Oklahoma and Arkansas (and Texas before that) when I got out of the A/C car and started riding, for the first 20 minutes it seemed like "yeah, if I keep a moderate pace, don't go too hard, the air-flow will keep me from feeling terrible".

    20 minutes later, you feel terrible.
    It definitely takes some time to get used to the humidity. If you're used to drier air, you can't just come out to a humid environment of the same temps and push yourself to the same level. The humidity will knock you back several notches until your body acclimates to cooling itself under those conditions.

  37. #37
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    I sweat like crazy too, so I don't usually even go riding if it's over 80F (like today). Unfortunately my hands sweat and they end up really dried out and cracked afterwards. I'm having to put steroid cream on them at night to help the inflammation. Oh well, other people in the world have way worse problems. Also I gave up having a backpack because my back sweated so bad. So you are not alone. You just have to live with it and pick and chose when and where to ride if it's hot. Or bike at dusk.

    But sweating is a blessing in disguise. Your skin is an elimination organ, which means sweat helps get rid of toxins in your body. Sweating is very healthy overall. It may actually extend your life span. So don't knock it too much. It's a very necessary evil.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    sweat helps get rid of toxins in your body.
    load of shit. this is what your liver does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    load of shit. this is what your liver does.
    Well, the skin will detox if the liver is overtaxed. So if you are leaking toxins it's not a blessing it's a reason to see a dr. The only toxin that is normal to find in sweat is urea because your body slows fluids down through the kidneys to use it for cooling.

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    OP try and drop some weight if you can stand to loose any. The more mass you carry. The more you need to sweat to cool it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    there's normal sweat, and then there's hyperhidrosis. some people sweat excessively so much that they can't keep up, no matter how much they drink, and even when they are not working hard or in hot weather. if this is the case, see a doctor.

    otherwise, wear clothes that allow the sweat to wick away and evaporate to keep you cool and dry. where I live, it's hot for most of the year, so it's just a part of riding. I carry a full 3L hydration pack most of the time for a <3 hour ride and usually empty it. sometimes I have to find a drinking fountain to refill. water bottles are out of the question because they don't carry enough water.

    bank5- what do you wear when you ride? any cotton? stick to synthetic materials designed for sweating, or wool. well-made, thin wool does a surprisingly awesome job of keeping you dry and cool.



    I wish it was only 90 degrees in central Texas! the truth is that you were probably sweating the whole time, but since you were moving, the sweat was evaporating off your body and cooling you down some. as soon as you stop moving, you continue to sweat, but the sweat builds up because it does not have a breeze pulling it off you.
    Good advice. I only ride in synthetic. Spandex, great light weight fox shorts with mesh strips on them for airflow, and a synthetic shirt.

    I feel pretty well acclimated now where I don't sweat too much while riding, just when I stop and especially post ride.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    OP try and drop some weight if you can stand to loose any. The more mass you carry. The more you need to sweat to cool it.
    I have about 11% body fat, but wouldn't mind losing 5-10lbs of fat and getting in better riding shape. I usually don't ride a lot in the summer

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    During the hot summer days, it's not the sweat that bugs me. It's the exhaustion and heat stroke! There have been times when you just have to get to the top of the hill and don't want to stop. Then you just start feeling dizzy and very weak. My head starts boiling. I realize I'm getting heat stroke. I immediately get a bandana from my pack and pour water on it, then put it on my head. Or sometimes just pour water directly on my head. Helps tremendously.

    One time, I got off my bike and leaned to open my backpack to get the bandana and water and as I leaned forward, I blacked out. Went face first into the ground. When I came to a minute later, I thought I had broken my nose (but didn't). My face was scratched up pretty bad. That taught me a big lesson to not over exert myself and take frequent breaks in the shade during hot sunny days.

    One problem is that as soon as I stop, I get attacked by bugs!

    BTW, I ride both regular and e-bikes. This year, I'm planning on only taking the e-bike on the brutally hot days.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    Loose weight. Fat people sweat more. Get fitter. Fitter people use less energy riding and sweat less. Ride at night when its cooler.

    Lastly, get a water based sport for when its stupid hot! I kitesurf too and its a glorious thing to do a hard out session in the middle of summer and and finish your session cool and refreshed.

    Also find a swimming spot for the end of your ride. Ride like hell, sweat like a rapist then jump in the water at the he end. Yourl come out refreshed and depending on ow anal you are, you wont need an immediate shower.
    I ride stand up jet skis in the summer much more than I bike. I also have a small pool I can jump in after rides.

  45. #45
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    Seems like your sorted then. You have a pool, a summer water sport and 11% body fat.

    Now you need to embrace the sweating and get out there an ride.

    The only thing that will make you sweat less now is more fitness or less heat.

  46. #46
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    Also, proper electrolytes to keep your body cool and functioning in the extreme environments. I donít mean fructose-laden gatorade, but true electrolyte mix for your pack or an extra water bottle. Drinking tons of water makes me feel pretty bad in oppressive heat (hard to feel good in any case), but electrolytes help immensely.
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    Same boat here. Sweat more than I can drink per hour in the Texas summer.

    I canít really stop the sweating, but I have come up with some routines to help deal with it better. Heck, it was so humid on the 4th during my morning ride that I made my own mud that clogged my cleats when I stopped in the middle of a drought.

    First, I switched to a hip pack to get the airflow over my back. Holds less water for sure but I compensate by drinking a lot of water right before I go. I also take salt tabs while I hydrate before I go. Seems to stay in my system without cussing me to need to urinate during the ride.

    Only super thin clothes that breathe. Nike Pro Cool work for me, but whatever fits you is good.

    Ride in the shade. I try to avoid any exposed trails when the sun is high. Only ride those early or late.

    Finally, I drink water like itís a job even off the bike and combine it with electrolytes. This routine is a major improvement over last summer for me. Years of road riding never wore me down as fast as MTB.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Also, proper electrolytes to keep your body cool and functioning in the extreme environments. I donít mean fructose-laden gatorade, but true electrolyte mix for your pack or an extra water bottle. Drinking tons of water makes me feel pretty bad in oppressive heat (hard to feel good in any case), but electrolytes help immensely.
    That's because you're probably pushing yourself close, if not into, hyponatremia levels of electrolyte dilution.

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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    That's because you're probably pushing yourself close, if not into, hyponatremia levels of electrolyte dilution.

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    Thank you, but no, I'm well aware of how many oz I drink.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Thank you, but no, I'm well aware of how many oz I drink.
    You're welcome . If you're not drinking an electrolyte replinshement, are sweating, and drinking "tons" of water then counting oz of pure water may not be all you need.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    ...The only thing that will make you sweat less now is more fitness or less heat.
    Is this correct? Is there in fact an inverse relationship between fitness level and amount of sweating? That is NOT consistent with what I have observed. Some of the most fit people I know sweat profusely. And some not so fit people I know remain as dry as a bone in hell-like temps. I have seen nothing but randomness in this regard.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I live in NC and part of the reason I don't like riding in summer is because of the heat causing fatigue and the extra time to shower, dry clothes, get new clothes immediately after each ride. But I rode in 90+ degree heat today and didn't sweat that much for whatever reason. I tend to sweat more once I stop.

    I'm guessing common sense like ride in shade, get in better shape, etc but any other things to help reduce the amount of sweat during and after a ride?
    I used to live in Va, so I feel your pain. I had a friend who bought a Sprinter van for cycling. He kept a large bladder of water in the van and would put it on the roof after a ride and use it to rinse off. Made a world of difference. Rinse off the sweat, and cool down at the same time. Then dry off and through on your regular clothes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Is this correct? Is there in fact an inverse relationship between fitness level and amount of sweating? That is NOT consistent with what I have observed. Some of the most fit people I know sweat profusely. And some not so fit people I know remain as dry as a bone in hell-like temps. I have seen nothing but randomness in this regard.
    Probably not much you can change about the sweating itself. A lot of people's sweat production is determined by genetics. What you can change is how you handle it and how it makes you feel when you exert yourself in conditions that make you sweat.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Is this correct? Is there in fact an inverse relationship between fitness level and amount of sweating? That is NOT consistent with what I have observed. Some of the most fit people I know sweat profusely. And some not so fit people I know remain as dry as a bone in hell-like temps. I have seen nothing but randomness in this regard.
    1) Fitter people will not have to work as hard to produce a given speed.

    2) Fitter people are capable of working far harder and longer than less fit people.

    3) There are outliers for every trait.


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    Thatís all very interesting to me. I guess I am either an outlier or I just try one hell of a lot harder than all the dry guys who get destroyed on rides.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    1) Fitter people will not have to work as hard to produce a given speed.

    2) Fitter people are capable of working far harder and longer than less fit people.

    3) There are outliers for every trait.


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    While this is true, it doesn't really correspond directly with the amount of sweat produced. Some people just sweat like mofos without exerting themselves.

    But there's also this:

    https://www.physiology.org/doi/abs/1....1988.65.2.811
    https://academic.oup.com/ageing/arti...20/6/439/35354

    I would argue that the sample sizes are just too small, but it's interesting, nonetheless, to find multiple studies showing that fitter people produce MORE sweat, contrary to what some have said here.

  57. #57
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    Gonna make you sweat till you bleed...

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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Is this correct?
    Not really. We're all different and some people sweat more. In my teens I had a friend who was literally soaking wet if he did any kind of exercise. At Karate for instance, we were all doing exactly the same things and the same time, we were all sweating a bit but he was making puddles on the floor.

    I'm not even sure it's simply fitness level. Over the years mine has gone up and down but I haven't noticed any change in how profusely I sweat.

  59. #59
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    I sweat excessively and I barely have to do anything. I have to wear a headband when I ride, mow the grass, or even stand in my garage with the door open. I can't count how many times my hands will sweat (or moist up) just using my computer. I think it's hereditary because my oldest daughter sweats easily too. Due to this condition, I opted to stay away from bike commuting to my college campus which is 2.5 miles away. I would be drenched in sweat as if I rode 100 miles before class started.
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  60. #60
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    Add me to the list of excessive sweaters. This is the reason I don't walk or bike to work more often, even though it's a only few miles from my home. I would work up a sweat and not cool down for at least an hour. Showering seems to start it all over again, even a cool one.

    I used to only drink (a lot of) water on rides. I've wondered about hyponatremia possibly being the cause of extreme headaches after big rides. However, I've never suffered any of the other symptoms. I added non-sugary electrolyte drinks to my rides but the headaches persist. I guess that's just from exertion.

    I do wear synthetic shirts on rides, but they get saturated nonetheless. I also wear a Halo headband with the little squeegee strip, to keep sweat out of my eyes; but I have to stop and wring it out several times on long rides.

    Fortunately, I can count on one hand (2 fingers, actually) the number of times I've cramped up on rides.

    tl;dr: Nothing helps, I just have to live with it.
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    I have a low body fat percentage. I sweat much more than anyone else, including people who are overweight. That has always been the case my entire life.

    I have been riding to work, year round, on a very hilly 7.5 mile commute, for 15+ years. I arrive at work soaked. Doesnít matter if itís 20 below or 90 degrees outside. I sit in my office for 15 minutes to a half hour, door closed, so I can cool down. Then I change and carry on. As I said in another thread, while I have been cursed by being born a sweaty sonofa b, I was at least blessed by being relatively stink free.

    At least 2 of those weekdays, I am in the mountains after work. Then again on at least one day on the weekend so in total, I sweat profusely, on average, 13 separate times a week. Good times.

  62. #62
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    The only thing that has made me sweat less was quitting the booze. In general, Iím a profuse sweater and in general I am extremely fit.

    I sweat less now post booze, but I still soak my clothes cycling or spinning. I cannot do either before work as Iíll start a second sweat even after a shower.

    I just run hot.


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    That last post reminded me - if I donít drink a cup of coffee in the morning before hopping on my bike, I sweat significantly less. Perhaps not surprisingly, coffee ramps up the sweating big time. 2 cups before my morning commute and itís a shit show.

  64. #64
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    As soon as my HR jumps above 140bpm, I sweat like crazy. Obviously less intensity = less sweat, however it's like a switch is flicked for me at that point, interesting observation imo.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    That last post reminded me - if I donít drink a cup of coffee in the morning before hopping on my bike, I sweat significantly less. Perhaps not surprisingly, coffee ramps up the sweating big time. 2 cups before my morning commute and itís a shit show.
    Dang, I ALWAYS drink coffee before a ride. Like 5-6 cups. I donít know if Iím ready to quit the java to test the no coffee, no sweat hypothesis.


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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravewoofer View Post
    Dang, I ALWAYS drink coffee before a ride. Like 5-6 cups. I donít know if Iím ready to quit the java to test the no coffee, no sweat hypothesis.


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    The one thing coffee is good for is fasted rides. A cup of black coffee helps get the metabolism going and really helps achieve those benefits.

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  67. #67
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    Not suggesting to quit the coffee. I have a bunch of Ironman friends. They all drink a shit load of coffee before anything. Among the many benefits, it helps to encourage a good poop pre-activity. Lots of those same people maintain that caffeine also helps with endurance.

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    I really doubt there is much you can do about it. Some people sweat more than others, but really you just have to live with it. Do what you can to mitigate negative issues, drink lots, sweat Buster's etc

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Not suggesting to quit the coffee. I have a bunch of Ironman friends. They all drink a shit load of coffee before anything. Among the many benefits, it helps to encourage a good poop pre-activity. Lots of those same people maintain that caffeine also helps with endurance.
    The caffeine helps open your airways, among other things. Definitely has benefits for athletes.

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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    The caffeine helps open your airways, among other things. Definitely has benefits for athletes.

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  71. #71
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    Can't fathom caffeine before a ride, my heart would explode. I'm thinking any benefit gained is due to physiological changes from long term use, aka addiction.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Diuretic
    Yep, that's why the top level pros in the Tour de France avoid it like the plague, oh wait...

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  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Can't fathom caffeine before a ride, my heart would explode. I'm thinking any benefit gained is due to physiological changes from long term use, aka addiction.
    The less acclimated you are to it the more effective it will work for the uses Harold is referring to.

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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Not suggesting to quit the coffee. I have a bunch of Ironman friends. They all drink a shit load of coffee before anything. Among the many benefits, it helps to encourage a good poop pre-activity. Lots of those same people maintain that caffeine also helps with endurance.
    Whew......of all the vices ive given up, coffee would be a deal breaker
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    You northern guys are spoiled. Come ride in Florida for a month and see what sweating really is. I just did several rides in NC last week and it felt like winter here. Totally comfortable for me because I'm used to riding my bike in a goddamn sauna. (can you tell I'm over this shit?)

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Ride in your birthday suit (or budgie smugglers, if you're modest) ^^

    Would keep you cool & also be quite liberating ;-)

    'Born to ride!'
    I will try to ride in birthday suit

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  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Is this correct? Is there in fact an inverse relationship between fitness level and amount of sweating? That is NOT consistent with what I have observed. Some of the most fit people I know sweat profusely. And some not so fit people I know remain as dry as a bone in hell-like temps. I have seen nothing but randomness in this regard.
    +1.

    I follow tennis, and Rafa Nadal (World #1) sweats profusely, more than anyone on the pro tour. He towels off after every point...face, arms, etc. Completely dripping. Changes shirts and bandanas several times over the course of a match. Doesn't matter where it is, what the temp is, inside or out.

    Roger Federer (World #2) barely glistens. You might catch him flicking an eyebrow once or twice over a 3 hour match.

    Trust me, they are both elite athletes at the peak of fitness for their sport. Completely different body types. Completely different ways of producing strokes. Completely different movement.

    Genetics.
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    It's been 2.5 years since Kevin Garnett's last NBA game, and he's still poring sweat.

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    Your best option is to finish your ride around sunrise. The time before that is the coolest temps you'll see.
    Google weather and your zip to see the graph.

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