How to steal a bike

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  • 03-03-2007
    gigatech
    How to steal a bike
    Some of you may have seen this, It just shows how people dont care.

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  • 03-03-2007
    RiskEverything
    Yeah I posted that in a few other forums. Great video- highly educational
  • 03-03-2007
    mrpercussive
    Yea that sux... i had my bike stripped before on campus and no one gave a ****... you file a police report and they look at you funny when you tell them you lost some bike parts...

    but man... that last one was hilarious...
  • 03-03-2007
    gigatech
    the last one is great, but i dont get how vice grips would work better, well i do have a hang over. Maybe ill figure it out later.
  • 03-03-2007
    Psycho Mike
    Heck, my wife confronted a guy at the bike racks right in front of the local university hospital at about 11 am. He was jimmying the lock on a bike and pretty obviously no the owner. She confronted him about it and was told to F*** off...she called out to the other folks (about a dozen in the area) for some support and to get the campus 5-0...they ignored her and the guy rode off with somebody's Stumpy.
  • 03-03-2007
    TrikeKid
    This is the exact reason I couldn't ride a bike worth more more than $2 to school (I'm not in range to ride a bike to school anyway). People just don't give a rat's ass about anyone else or their property. People around here would think nothing of just throwing the loose portion of cable around the hitch on their truck and yanking it, and nobody but the bike's owner would stop them.
  • 03-03-2007
    hamachi
    this brings back some painful memories -- i lost a gt interceptor (bmx) in front of the public library when i was in grade school... i came out of the library, saw my broken bike lock, ran down the sidewalk, and saw pieces of stickers that i had placed on my bike all over the ground =(
  • 03-03-2007
    xKREDx
    Ha ha thats funny.

    I like the grinder one.
  • 03-03-2007
    flatlikedarren
    anyone ever have a bike stolen with a ulock?
  • 03-03-2007
    SnowMongoose
    if theres room to fit it, a jack will pop a U-lock from what I've heard.
    big enough grinder > any lock, and most racks
    :P
  • 03-04-2007
    gigatech
    or a pipe cutter, and depending on the locking mechanism on the u lock, a bic pen can open it. And no its not just kryptonite locks.
  • 03-05-2007
    dh1
    If you have an older Kryptonite lock, with the barrel key..
    call Kryptonite and talk with them. I had originally called them to order new keys for a couple of older locks I had sitting around.

    The guy on the phone said they had recalled all U locks with the barrel keys. At first the service rep acted like I should have known about it:rolleyes: . I had moved 5 times since I bought these 2 locks in 1992 and I had no idea they were recalled. ANYWAY, they offered a voluntary recall about 4-5 years ago due to the bic pen trick. They sent me 2 brand new u locks. I had to mail my old ones back. I had to be persistent, because at first they were trying to get me to "buy" a new lock even though they had recalled the originals.

    U locks are the best IMO, but don't get one too big because they can jack them with a hydraulic jack. I tried like hell to break one when I lost my key. I tried a saw, tried freezing it with freon, tried to fit a jack in and couldn't, tried bolt cutters with 4 ft of pipe over the handles. I know there are ways to break them, but it isn't easy. I would imagine that a angle grinder would work with enough time.

    I have heard good things about Kryptonite's NYC chain too. BUT locks are only good when used and only as good as the fixed object you locked your bike to.
  • 03-05-2007
    TommyTiger
    Nothing new
    Man, tell me about it. People have no respect for private property. I remember back in the days when I was in college, and I borrowed my roomie's cannondale M900 without asking, cuz he was outta town visiting his parents. I had two focking kryptonite locks and still some a$$hole managed to get the fine thing and pedal away when I was leaving the party all drunk and tired.

    I spent the whole next week scouting around campus and downtown, first I found a half-decent trek, but too small, then finally I found a green and blue gary fisher supercaliber. This was back in 99, and the bike had a SID fork which was hot sh1t back then. My roomie laughed his ass off when I told him what had happened. The M900 wasn't new anyway, and after buying a new stem he could ride the fisher no problemo.

    But jesus, I almost sh1t my pants back then. Funny, huh?
  • 03-05-2007
    DocAltie
    Well... if you can get away with a power, rotary tool, I am sorry but NOTHING you buy will stand up to it. I've used a cordless Dremel tool to recover my own bike twice:

    1st time - I lost my keys to my U-lock

    2nd time - I found my stolen bike. Told the cops and they refused to do anything. So I stole it right back! Zipped through their chain in about 12sec.
  • 03-05-2007
    4212darren
    I hate to tell you but they make cordless angle grinders. No bike is safe anymore if a thief is determined. I have an expensive bike and am worried about it every time I leave on a road trip. What's the best lock?
  • 03-05-2007
    DocAltie
    I don't think there is a "best" lock. I think the best way to secure your bike is keeping it inside a vehicle or office where you work.

    Otherwise you can lock stuff all day and someone will slice right through whatever you have. I am suprised that in the bike community no one has tried a TI lock though. You spend $1000 on a bike and you lock it up with $5-$20 of steel?

    I'd spend $200 on a lock if they insured my bike against theft.
  • 03-05-2007
    gigatech
    reinforced hand cuffs, or a inner steel braided cable with an outside of solid steel, thing really big u lock.
  • 03-07-2007
    txcowboy
    Had my bike stolen right out of my garage while I was eating dinner with the family. The police don't give a crap at all about bike theft unless the crime falls in their lap.

    I like the handcuff idea ... maybe even put "Police" stickers on your bike. I carry my bike with me even into stores.
  • 03-07-2007
    Kris
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DocAltie
    I am suprised that in the bike community no one has tried a TI lock though. You spend $1000 on a bike and you lock it up with $5-$20 of steel?

    Steel is harder than Ti.
  • 03-07-2007
    gotdirt
    bike thieves are vermin
    i've had 6 mtn bikes stolen over the years...

    3 in CO --chained on campus or garaged at home
    2 in NYC --one cable lock, one krypto ulock (before the bic pen threat)
    1 in boston --which was actually locked to a friend's truck when it (the truck) was stolen!

    ...it is a very, very, very rare occasion that my bike is out of my sight these days. for several years after losing #6 i didn't even own a lock-- just took the bike w/ me everywhere (i got pretty good at quickly & quietly gaining entry w/ the bike to the bodegas/delis in NYC; once i was already inside w/ the bike they really couldn't say much, as opposed to stopping me at the door.

    "sorry 'bout that, i forgot my lock today... just need to grab a quick sandwich". ;)
  • 03-07-2007
    Dwight Moody
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DocAltie
    ...a vehicle or office where you work.

    A car window is a lot easier to break than a decent bike lock. Definitely having your bike in sight of people who know it is your bike is the best defense. I have to park my bike on a college campus and I've been really happy to be able to watch it out the window during one of my classes. Of course, I just sat there thinking about riding rather than management. Stupid required courses. grumble...
  • 03-07-2007
    RiskEverything
    Hmmm... depleted Uranium U-Lock? Uranium is radioactive but it decays at such a slow rate that you can hold it in your bare hands without effect. It's uber-dense, too- I'm not sure a cutting wheel could do much more than scratch it.
  • 03-07-2007
    zombiekiller
    my best defense is a NY shorty ulock around my seat tube, a ny chain through the wheels locked to a parking meter.

    I also got ahold of some Huffy stickers and but them on the bike i ride around the city on. here in philly the bike thieves are pretty educated as to what brands to steal, so they see huffy from afar and keep on goin.
  • 03-07-2007
    Karupshun
    I have specialized coil lock from a few years back. it has a still poly would layer over the super thick steel braid cable.

    the packaging gaurenteed against hacksaws, bolt cutters, and just about any other ideas.
    The poly coating is designed to melt to hacksaw blades and make them usless.

    I had an old Norco Sasquatch locked up with it, and it looks like someone *tried* to use a saw and gave up
  • 03-07-2007
    SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RiskEverything
    Yeah I posted that in a few other forums. Great video- highly educational

    true but isn't cool
  • 03-07-2007
    KPVSR
    I always get worried about mine at adventure races. There rerally is not time to lock it after you ride and there are sooo many people around. I did one in Alabama where after the ride part is done your bike gets loaded up and brought back to the finish area and set out in the grass with a ton of other bikes. No secure area, nobody watching and anyone allowed to go in and grab a bike. Since the bikes are randomly placed in the area you have no idea where yours is so you have to wander around looking. It appeared like it would have been very easy for someone to wander through the bikes until they found one they liked and walk off with it. I would like to think a fellow racer wouldn't do this but anyone was allowed in the bike area. I don't think I will be doing that race again. Any one ever here of bikes being stolen at races? Many times it looks like easy pickins for a theif.
  • 03-07-2007
    Offtime3123
    What point are they trying to make here? I see little good that can come from this.
  • 03-07-2007
    JoshS
    had my bike stolen feb 14th, i was not happy, it was the day i had my class on the otherside of campus and only 20 munites to get there. my fault was putting some xt components, a psylo fork and so rims on my old haro that came off my trek project. man that was a fast bike. what made me mad was the night it dissapeared someone came to our complex and put flyers on all the cars, so i went to the place that the flyers were for. and the lady said they employed collge students, but they were all "good kids", then she said "but i can understand your frustration" good kids my butt.
    people have no respect for anyone else property, everyone wonders why i am paranoid about my truck, considering some guy in a parking lot i work in backed into my truck bumper. i came out and saw the dent in his car and asked what he backed into, he pointed and said that, which i though was a pole but the more i look at my bumper i con't remeber the scratches in the chrome. no real damage but he didn't even try to figure out who's car it was, if i had known at the time i would have said something, but obviously he was a bad driver, had a backup camera and sensors, heck he hit one of the sensor dead on
  • 03-07-2007
    fanghasyou
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned this, but I think bystanders probably think that the bike belongs to the person that is cutting away at the lock. The misconception they get is that "Oh, its during the day, no one in their right mind would steal a bike, so that guy trying to cut away the lock must forgot his key/combo and thats why he's cutting away the lock" Especially with the angle grinder, its loud, everyone probably thinks a thief would never use that and conclude it must be the bike of the person cutting the lock.

    And another psychologic thing, if no one else is doing anything about it, why should I. People follow the actions of the group.
  • 03-08-2007
    Karupshun
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Offtime3123
    What point are they trying to make here? I see little good that can come from this.

    The extreme disregard of another fellow human being's posessions. look at the people around him no one cares, that fat biatch of a lady just lit a cigarette:madman:

    I had a bike locked outside a mall in plain daylight, and when I got off work at 3pm someone had spent enought time rocking the bike back and forth so much that the rim hit the seatstay & chainstay
  • 03-08-2007
    Guyechka
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fanghasyou
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned this, but I think bystanders probably think that the bike belongs to the person that is cutting away at the lock. The misconception they get is that "Oh, its during the day, no one in their right mind would steal a bike, so that guy trying to cut away the lock must forgot his key/combo and thats why he's cutting away the lock" Especially with the angle grinder, its loud, everyone probably thinks a thief would never use that and conclude it must be the bike of the person cutting the lock.

    And another psychologic thing, if no one else is doing anything about it, why should I. People follow the actions of the group.

    I was thinking the same thing. At the same time, I've had enough experience with people's blatant disregard for others to understand that, even if they were positive the dude was a thief, they still wouldn't lift a finger. What stands out is the cop car that passes by (almost hits him), and no one sticks their head out the window to question what is going on. This tells me that, if you see a bike thief in action, find the largest rock, 2X4 or lead pipe in the area and bash his brains in. Then leave without saying a word, because who really gives a damn?:rolleyes:
  • 03-08-2007
    George2
    I live in Amsterdam, notorious for it's biketheft's. I never, ever park my 'fancy' bikes in town but I wouldn't want my 1 speed city racer stolen either so I do have a few tricks to deter thiefs.

    Locking up 'Amsterdam Style' is first to find something solid. A strong rack, a pole or a tree. Use one strong lock (a u-lock or a heavy-duty chainlock) to lock the frame to the solid object. If the lock is long enough then use it to lock the frontwheel as well, if not then use extra locks for both wheels.

    Every bike can be stolen but the thieves will pick the one that is worth most (luckily they have limited knowledge) and is the least trouble. If your bike is (or seems) heavily locked they will pick another one. At races and events I usually ask someone to keep an eye on my bike (either someone in my party or just a random fellow biker) when I go in to register.
  • 03-08-2007
    shiggy
    There was a story in the '80s about bike thieves winching an entire full bike rack onto a flatbed truck while a crowd watched. They got away clean.
  • 03-10-2007
    Box Elder
    1 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 4212darren
    I hate to tell you but they make cordless angle grinders. No bike is safe anymore if a thief is determined. I have an expensive bike and am worried about it every time I leave on a road trip. What's the best lock?

    Quadrachain is difficult to scratch, much less damage. I have one of the originals by St.Pierre with the Italian lock and six feet of plastic wrapped chain. Over ten pounds! My second one uses the new panzer lock along with six feet of the super hardend chain. Someone went after my Scalpal a year ago and were able to easily cut a coule master locks securing long cables, and they cut through a propane hose that was tangled up in my quadrachain, as the bike set in the back of my truck. When I woke up and went outside, the bike was dangling out of the back of the truck, still being held by the quadrachain. I was able to find a tiny scratch on it. I'll include a small picture of the old St. Pierre lock.


    Quote:

    A really heavy duty chain is going to be absolutely the strongest thing you can hang your bike on. Bolt and chain cutters were designed to go through round sections of steel. Making the steel from strong alloys, hardening them and making the links square all contribute to making a chain too tough to cut.
    Quadrachain makes a heavy duty Nickel-Chrome-Moybdenum alloy steel chain with square links and a lock that is a large brick of hardened, forged alloy steel. The lock completely shields the shackle. It is heavy, strong and expensive; you can't cut it; your bike will be there when you get back. It weighs 4 3/4 pounds for the 2 foot length with lock and 6 1/2 pounds for the the 3 foot version. MSRP $112.46. I totally fell in love with this one, the lock feels extremely precise and looks impervious to everything.
    Kryptonite makes one that has squared links and a 1 pound 2 oz. U-Lock to tie everything together. The chain is a 3 foot long piece of four-sided "triple-heat-treated, boron manganese steel". The lock is miniature U-lock made for motorcycle security. Its shackle is 5/8" thick. It even has a warning notice on it that reads, "WARNING Remove lock before operating vehicle." MSRP $104.00 for the chain and lock. This lock is a pleasure to touch and to hold and actually looks cute with the little yellow U-lock on the end.