Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    61

    How do I properly oil a bike?

    Got a new bike the other day, a Trek GF Marlin 23" frame 29'er.

    Have not rode much in 20 years, trying to improve my physical conditioning. My 20 year old Trek 950 single track has been collecting dust for some time. Bigger now than when I used to be (6'5" 300 lbs) and the 23" 29'er allowed me to fit on a bike for the first time in a long while.

    Got the new bike out today for first time, heard some squeeking near front wheel. Made me wonder what type of oil to use, where to apply, etc..

    Curious about lubricating the chain and gears/sprocket.

    Also, this is my first bike with a front shock. Does it require any special care or lubrication? Got sand on it already, aside from wiping it off with a cloth, wasn't sure what maintenance it needed. Thanks for any comment.



    -Dan





  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    783
    That squeeking may just be your disc brake rubbing. You can apply chain lube to a chain but nothing else needs oiling. Other parts, hubs, bottom bracket, headset, are greased or sealed. I clean my chain and use dry lube once a week but I'd look at your brake first.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    61
    That makes sense. I rode the bike in the parking lot at the shop where I bought it, heard nothing. Got it home, put front wheel on, and it is squeeking. I did notice it was difficult to get the wheel on as the disc brake slot was hard to get fitted. Not sure why it is rubbing now though. Does it matter which side of the nut that holds the front wheel on is turned (lever side or round side)? Wonder if I got it out of whack a bit by turning the wrong end, or if it even matters. Never had a bike with disc brakes so this is new to me. Thanks for any comment.



    -Dan

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    783
    On the front wheel it doesn't what side the lever is on but I like it on the right (non-disc) side so I avoid the rotor with my hand when I take the wheel on or off. When you replace the wheel insert it in the fork then push down on the stem to center the wheel and push it all the way into the dropouts as you tighten it. You should feel the lever start to get tight when it's about half way closed and it's normal if you need to use the fork or some spokes as leverage to pull the lever all the way tight.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    11
    sharp looking bike

  6. #6
    canuck
    Reputation: Aaron D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    707
    skewer levers always go on the left side

    only lube chain when it starts squeaking

    wash with light soapy water when dirty

    take to your shop every 6 months for check up it'll reduce the cost of yearly tunups

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    61
    Thanks for the suggestions guys. I have never had shocks or disc brakes. Just figured it better to ask here than make some rookie mistake. I don't buy bikes often (20 years since last Trek 950). Want to take care of it right.


    -Dan

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron D View Post
    skewer levers always go on the left side
    ...
    No. You can have the front QR lever on either side. I have been running mine on the right for 20+ years.

    Many TA forks have the axle lever on the right, too.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: skullcap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    980
    Whatver you do, DON'T consult the owner's manual. It's not helpful in the least.
    I'm enjoying my childhood way too much to ever give it up.

  10. #10
    My spelling is atroshus
    Reputation: RBowles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    812
    WD40, and put lots of it on everything.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    54
    Great looking bike! Congrats.
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster."

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Andy Pancroft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    511
    Quote Originally Posted by jlmuncie View Post
    On the front wheel it doesn't what side the lever is on but I like it on the right (non-disc) side so I avoid the rotor with my hand when I take the wheel on or off. When you replace the wheel insert it in the fork then push down on the stem to center the wheel and push it all the way into the dropouts as you tighten it. You should feel the lever start to get tight when it's about half way closed and it's normal if you need to use the fork or some spokes as leverage to pull the lever all the way tight.
    +1
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron D View Post
    skewer levers always go on the left side

    only lube chain when it starts squeaking

    wash with light soapy water when dirty

    take to your shop every 6 months for check up it'll reduce the cost of yearly tunups
    On my road bikes, I agree. On the mtb, I agree with jlmuncie!!! Here is an example on Lance Pharmstrong's bike at last year's Leadville 100

  13. #13
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,103
    9 times out of 10 you take the wheel off and when you put it back on the brake will rub. Has to do with tightness of the skewer and the independent fork legs. I picked up one of these (1up USA Quick Nuts) that way I can put the wheel in, center the rotor, then it will (should) go back in the same place every time.
    When you get older, much of your hate comes from knowledge and experience, which is why really old people hate everyone

  14. #14
    banned
    Reputation: Flankerdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    347
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron D View Post
    skewer levers always go on the left side

    only lube chain when it starts squeaking

    wash with light soapy water when dirty

    take to your shop every 6 months for check up it'll reduce the cost of yearly tunups
    Only lube the chain when it starts squeaking?

    Take it to the shop every six months?



    Really?

    As far as the front wheel squeaking, check the alignment. It may not be seated flush when you tighten the quick release.

    Nothing on that bike needs "oil" other than the chain, and it should be lubed every ride. Maybe the stanchion seals once in a while if it's really dry and dusty where you live.

    Lube, let sit ten minutes, wipe clean.

  15. #15
    Sweat is just fat crying.
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    9,685
    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob View Post
    9 times out of 10 you take the wheel off and when you put it back on the brake will rub. Has to do with tightness of the skewer and the independent fork legs. I picked up one of these (1up USA Quick Nuts) that way I can put the wheel in, center the rotor, then it will (should) go back in the same place every time.
    And the brake lever could have gotten pushed in when the wheel was out- this will cause the pads to come out farther, hence the squealing/rubbing.
    Mountain Biking Is Not A Crime stickers, free! (You pay postage. PM me for details.)

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    61
    I believe it was the brake rubbing. Still there and will inspect in morning, working last few days out of town. Neat idea in the product link above. Thanks man. May order one for the wife and I both.



    -Dan

  17. #17
    dvn
    dvn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dvn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    609
    Make sure your front wheel is seated properly and then re-align your caliper. I can't post links yet but search on Youtube for "Adjusting Disc Brake Calipers". BicyclingMag has a good one. It's a very easy procedure and needs to be done quite often when wheels are removed and replaced.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Pancroft View Post
    +1

    On my road bikes, I agree. On the mtb, I agree with jlmuncie!!! Here is an example on Lance Pharmstrong's bike at last year's Leadville 100
    That doesn't look like a skewer; it looks like a 15mm Maxle, which is threaded on the left and thus has to have the lever on the right.

    Edit: And unless you're made of money and don't care about the longevity (and efficiency) of your purchases, don't oil your chain when it gets squeaky, keep it clean and lube it before it gets squeaky.

Similar Threads

  1. Adjusting bike to fit you properly
    By joepa150 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-02-2010, 10:28 AM
  2. Properly Locking Your Bike
    By 08HardRock in forum Commuting
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-05-2010, 08:58 AM
  3. How to crate a bike properly
    By 40hills in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-17-2007, 08:38 PM
  4. bike doesnt fit me properly :/
    By Jarl in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-16-2006, 02:08 PM
  5. How Do I properly Clean My Bike?
    By mrblonde in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-10-2004, 06:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •