Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 229
  1. #1
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201

    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Heat stroke, how to recognize it.

    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.

    Link
    http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oG7...ing_signs.html

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GotoDengo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    893
    Good points. Scary part is a lot of the "sudden onset" symptoms might be hard to recognize when riding.

    Rapid pulse -- if you're riding pretty hard it's arleady up
    You stop sweating -- I'm such a sweathog and my shirt and bandana would already be soaked enough that I'm not sure I would notice.
    Disorientation -- I tend to get disoriented whenever I'm on an unmarked trail anyway
    Difficult breathing -- I guess there's a difference in heavy breathing vs. difficult breathing
    High body temperature -- Probably hard to tell if you're riding hard on a hot day as well.

    I usually don't ride whenever it's over 95, and my typical rides are pretty short (<2hrs) and mostly in the shade. I'm jealous of you AZ riders who mostly enjoy dry heat... that helps a lot as well. 85 or 95, it's tough to sweat in the muggy SE summers.

  3. #3
    Token Hillbilly
    Reputation: J. Fragera's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    712
    Good info!

    The big thing I always watch for is sweat. Stop every once in a while. If you don't have sweat immediately start beading... you're headed for trouble. Drink up.

    I have started using a camelbak every time I'm on the trail to promote drinking more. With bottles, it is sometimes harder to get a drink because of the logistics of getting the bottle out while tackling the tougher stuff. Since I only use water in the camelbak (to keep from souring when I can't wash it right after a ride), it leaves my bottle cage open to put a bottle of whatever electrolyte drink I am using at the time to augment hydration.

    You can withstand the heat, you just have to be hyper-aware and extremely diligent about putting more water in than you're losing.
    Trying to win hearts and minds, but willing to stomp them if necessary.

  4. #4
    Derptastic
    Reputation: Nadric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by GotoDengo View Post
    Difficult breathing -- I guess there's a difference in heavy breathing vs. difficult breathing
    Very much so. And thanks to allergy season rolling in, if I'm not drugged up I'd have a hell of a time riding. Congestion and a closed up throat are not conducive to aerobic exercise

  5. #5
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Quote Originally Posted by Nadric View Post
    Very much so. And thanks to allergy season rolling in, if I'm not drugged up I'd have a hell of a time riding. Congestion and a closed up throat are not conducive to aerobic exercise
    /\ This year has been a brutal one for allergies.

  6. #6
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    18,529
    I've come dangerously close to heat stroke on a couple of occasions in the past. I have not actually had it, but have had heat exhaustion (the step right before heat stroke) and have had to give aid to people flirting with the boundary, too.

    biggest deal is to get out of the heat. lay on your back with your feet up on a chair. if you have cool water available, submerge the hands or feet or run the water over the wrists/ankles. Blood vessels are close to the surface here and you can quickly cool the blood this way. cold pack on the forehead. drink water, get some electrolytes.

  7. #7
    SSOD
    Reputation: Crosstown Stew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    826
    Good info man. I sometimes experience a sudden cooling/ loss of body heat feeling followed by dissiness if I'm overworking it but I think that is along the lines of overheating and not necessarily stroke symptoms.

  8. #8
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,615
    watch for chills and vomiting....

    i hit both those early on in a race.....had to scale waaaay back to continue...

    it was not a fun race.....
    Click Here for Forum Rules

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: skullcap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    923
    I've stopped sweating a couple of times. It goes something like this:

    "Wow, cool, my skin is getting dry, I must've stopped sweating. OHCRAPIMUST'VE STOPPEDSWEATING!" And then I get off the bike and sit on a log/rock/the ground in the shade and suck water until I start sweating again.
    I'm enjoying my childhood way too much to ever give it up.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: skrap1r0n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    189
    I should know this, but I'm honestly not clear on it, especially re: the warning if you stop sweating part.

    I ~believe~ it is possible to be well hydrated and still suffer heat stroke. Or rather, by time you notice that symptom, you already HAVE heat stroke and haven't prevented it.

    I guess the thing is, to really listen to your body. Every one of us knows when our body is telling us to back off.

  11. #11
    Category 5 Gnarricane
    Reputation: jellytronics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    142
    Friend of mine blacked out temporarily after some strenuous climbing followed by break immediately afterwards. He felt dizzy/disoriented, then the vision started to go. Sat down on a log, then on the ground leaning against it, then laid down on the ground beside it. A few minutes later he was fine. However I don't think it was hot that day.

  12. #12
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Quote Originally Posted by jellytronics View Post
    Friend of mine blacked out temporarily after some strenuous climbing followed by break immediately afterwards. He felt dizzy/disoriented, then the vision started to go. Sat down on a log, then on the ground leaning against it, then laid down on the ground beside it. A few minutes later he was fine. However I don't think it was hot that day.
    That is a typical response from running in the "red zone" for too long. Some very good posts, a lot of good info, thanks to everyone.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    14
    When I was young( many years ago) I was playing tennis on a hot day and started to shiver. Freaked me out, was definitely time to quit and cool down.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    376
    Having landed myself a trip to the emergency room due to heat stroke, I can assure you that my experience was not fun at all. I had a fever of 108 and had to stay in the hospital for two night.

    I was fortunate that I was not out in the woods riding. I recognized something was really wrong when I was shivering in the shower. I called my friend to give me a ride to the hospital and then passed out as I was checking myself in. Next thing I remember was waking up on my back with a fan over me, a wet rag on my forehead, wires everywhere, and a bunch of people standing around me.

    The temperature outside that day was high 60s or low 70s with low humidity. The reason i passed out was because I was doing my fitness test for military. I didn't go to medical that morning since I did not feel sick; however, I started feeling sick after lunch when the afternoon started to roll around. Well that was too late to claim illness and get out of the test since it was too late to go to medical. Thus I was compelled to do the fitness test. Let's just say that after the run I realized I felt bad that day because my digestive system was in the process of purging itself clean...

    You can prolly guess where it goes from there since all the water I drank from that day was purged rather than absorbed.
    Last edited by jseko; 06-04-2011 at 11:06 AM.

  15. #15
    Always Learning
    Reputation: BruceBrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,553
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.
    Excellent advice.

    One of the most tragic and saddest stories ever to appear here at MTBR.com was a few years ago when a MTBR member posted up that he had taken his family out on a mountain bike ride on their vacation in the heat and his teenage daughter passed away from heatstroke in spite of all attempts to revive her. I don't have a link, but I remember reading the father's story and his advice to be very aware of the heat when choosing when and how long to ride. It was a tragic loss and the story was difficult to read.

    Be careful out there.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Good post! In the MTB community, many are pretty aware of this - the true problem lies with the weekend warrior types.

    The situation what Bruce Brown posted is very sad.

  17. #17
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,766
    I got the chills a couple weeks ago on a very humid day after climbing a hill. Very weird! I did stop for a few minutes until I felt normal.

  18. #18
    Riding and lovin it.
    Reputation: captain smoke eater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    121
    In order to leak water, you have to drink water!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blurr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    2,335
    Didnt come up, but having had it before the symptom that you cannot fail to recognize is the earth starts to bounce, almost like its an earthquake.

  20. #20
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,615
    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    ... a MTBR member posted up that he had taken his family out on a mountain bike ride on their vacation in the heat and his teenage daughter passed away from heatstroke in spite of all attempts to revive her....
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....
    Click Here for Forum Rules

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    376
    Something not mentioned in this post, probably because it's the wrong time of year for us northern hemisphere people, is that dehydration and heat stroke can also happen during cold weather.

  22. #22
    Always Learning
    Reputation: BruceBrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,553
    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....
    Yes, that's the story about Sylvia, CHUM. Thanks for finding that link. My eyes still well up today when I read that tragic story (that really could have happened to any of us).

    BB

  23. #23
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....


    Words are inadequate, thanks for posting that, maybe we can help prevent just one.

  24. #24
    Stucco Bucket
    Reputation: the_owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,767
    Curious, what part of AZ Mtns do you live in?

  25. #25
    Is it Friday yet?
    Reputation: kwrides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    589
    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Excellent advice.

    One of the most tragic and saddest stories ever to appear here at MTBR.com was a few years ago when a MTBR member posted up that he had taken his family out on a mountain bike ride on their vacation in the heat and his teenage daughter passed away from heatstroke in spite of all attempts to revive her. I don't have a link, but I remember reading the father's story and his advice to be very aware of the heat when choosing when and how long to ride. It was a tragic loss and the story was difficult to read.

    Be careful out there.
    Wow. Thank you for sharing this tragic story. I have a young daughter and this really brings it home. Sometimes I take things too far myself, and then have to remind myself to not only protect my daughter, but to protect ME so that I can be healthy and old with her.

    Sharing my own story, I once went for a road ride, before the days of cell phones, i was way out in the country and it was brutally hot. I saw rattle snakes on the road, that hot. Anyway, by the time I realized how overheated I was, I was in the middle of nowhere and there wasn't a car in sight. I found a church, but there was no shade under its awning. I got lucky and they had an open spigot. I poured water al over myself multiple times, lay down in the surrounding trees, and eventually limped back to the car after about a 20 minute break. Worst ride of my life. Worse than the one where I broke my wrist recently.

    So, my advice, never ride alone in this heat, and, always have a charged and dry cell phone.

  26. #26
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl View Post
    Curious, what part of AZ Mtns do you live in?
    Eastern AZ. The White Mountains, you may have seen it on the news recently.

  27. #27
    Stucco Bucket
    Reputation: the_owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,767
    My Family is from Clifton Morenci
    We have a family gathering at Big Lake outside of Springerville every year.

  28. #28
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl View Post
    My Family is from Clifton Morenci
    We have a family gathering at Big Lake outside of Springerville every year.
    Hope you get to do it this year, the forest is closed right now, fire, getting larger by the hour. Might not be anything left at Big Lake after today.

  29. #29
    Is it Friday yet?
    Reputation: kwrides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    589
    That sucks AZ. Sorry.

  30. #30
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Thanks man.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    9
    Thanks for the reminder and keep safe!

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    30
    Last summer I took part in a BBQ competition at the local county fair. Started at 9:00 and by noon it was 102*. I have no clue how much water I drank that day, but it was not enough. Had a camper at hand with a/c going and I spent a lot of time inside. My wife (nurse) came over for the judging which started about 5:00. Wife was real close to hauling me to the hospital then, but instead she got me home and got me run through the cold shower and then the cold washrags on face while laying in bed with fans going. She checked on me every few minutes and re-wet the washrags as needed. Had her pretty worried.

    I have never in my life felt that bad. Like I said, I stayed in the camper most of the day and all I drank was water, but it was not enough.

    From that day on, and even up to now, I can NOT take the heat near like what I used to... Like someone said above, listen to your body.

  33. #33
    That makes me smart
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    12,983
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Fragera View Post
    I have started using a camelbak every time I'm on the trail to promote drinking more. With bottles, it is sometimes harder to get a drink because of the logistics of getting the bottle out while tackling the tougher stuff. Since I only use water in the camelbak (to keep from souring when I can't wash it right after a ride), it leaves my bottle cage open to put a bottle of whatever electrolyte drink I am using at the time to augment hydration.
    One of the things I do is to drink from the C-bak when I see the guy in front of me taking a drink. It reminds me to drink.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.
    Thanks for the link, much appreciated...

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5

    mood

    is the first thing to go south with heat and hydration.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    9
    Good info, thanks!

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks for the info!!!

  38. #38
    banned
    Reputation: roadie scum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    773
    Good info, thanks.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bobby12many's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    844
    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....
    Nightmare scenario. What a tragic read.

    Thank you for sharing that link.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wizzer16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    271
    anyone from the east heading west- you will need to drink more than you normally do. Me and some friends traveled out to moab and started feeling bad. we were each drinking 1.5-2 gal a day just to feel hydrated tooling around. interesting how much of a difference the dry air makes.
    count your blessings

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,420
    I had a heat stroke 5 years ago on the race track with my sportbike. Bad things happen when you have a heat stroke at 130 mph.

  42. #42
    Tool
    Reputation: Pedalphile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,973
    Feeling chilly while still sweating heavily is my body's warning sign that I'm running too hot.

    For cooling the body in an emergency, a large rock that's in the shade may help, especially if a good portion of the rock is in the ground; it will pull some heat from the body.
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  43. #43
    banned
    Reputation: roadie scum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    773
    Bump because its important.

  44. #44
    Spanish rider
    Reputation: Pableras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    309
    I've experienced what I'd call a heat stroke (not sure if that was a real heat stroke) twice. This is what I felt like:

    - Blurred vision (like when you get up fast), I saw "sparks" everywhere.
    - Weak pulse (but quite fast)
    - Sensation of pressure in the ear. Difficult hearing.
    - Couldn't keep my balance, I had to sit down.


    Was that a heat stroke?
    A pessimist is an experienced optimist

  45. #45
    That makes me smart
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    12,983
    Quote Originally Posted by roadie scum View Post
    Bump because its important.
    After yesterday's rain, what about wet stroke???

  46. #46
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    24,637
    Yep, it's the dead of summer here in AZ. As in the story above, planning to come to Phoenix, Moab or Sedona or any other similar destination to ride on a vacation at this time of year is questionable. The lack of shade and abundance of rock reflects a lot of radiation back at you, and it ends up feeling a lot hotter than it is (even if it's already over 100°!). A camelback or a few waterbottles is usually NOT going to cut it, especially when help is not near. You can ride in the morning time, but you have to be ultra-careful to not be caught out there with the rising temps and diminishing water supply. Most people are NOT ready for what this heat and environment actually means and requires. Many of us go to higher ground and ride at times and distances we know will be bearable, not to maximize our riding experience or do new things necessarily. If you are planning to go to one of these places to ride in the dead of summer, look into the local boards and do a lot of research first.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,471

  48. #48
    XXIX
    Reputation: GatorB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    457
    One in my group was very close to heat stroke about a month ago. He was battling heat exhaustion. Cramps, slurred speech and vomiting. I had to tow him out and back to the parking lot. It was very scary and I never let on how worried I was but I was looking for a good spot to land the helicopter on the way out.
    When I was stationed at Camp Lejeune it seemed we lost a Marine a month during the summer to heat stroke.
    14' Vassago VerHauen
    [URL="https://m.facebook.com/pages/Spruce-Creek-Mtb-Trail/572082766223954"]

  49. #49
    Is it Friday yet?
    Reputation: kwrides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    589
    Quote Originally Posted by GatorB View Post
    One in my group was very close to heat stroke about a month ago. He was battling heat exhaustion. Cramps, slurred speech and vomiting. I had to tow him out and back to the parking lot. It was very scary and I never let on how worried I was but I was looking for a good spot to land the helicopter on the way out.
    When I was stationed at Camp Lejeune it seemed we lost a Marine a month during the summer to heat stroke.
    Yep, saw the same thing in PI.

  50. #50
    Is it Friday yet?
    Reputation: kwrides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    589
    Quote Originally Posted by terrasmak View Post
    I had a heat stroke 5 years ago on the race track with my sportbike. Bad things happen when you have a heat stroke at 130 mph.
    Ouch

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Convert Litespeed Sewanee Short Stroke to Long Stroke
    By voodood-jab in forum Litespeed
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-25-2012, 02:52 PM
  2. Anse had heat stroke?
    By tannerdrummer in forum Arizona
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 06-12-2010, 09:25 PM
  3. Upgrade DHX5 50mm stroke to 57mm stroke?
    By RenoRulez in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-06-2010, 12:15 PM
  4. Heat Stroke and hydration...
    By bellullabob in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-02-2006, 12:16 PM
  5. Allergic to Heat (Training for heat)
    By SurlyBob in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-24-2004, 09:16 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •