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  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Heat stroke, how to recognize it.

    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.

    Link
    http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oG7...ing_signs.html

  2. #2
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    Good points. Scary part is a lot of the "sudden onset" symptoms might be hard to recognize when riding.

    Rapid pulse -- if you're riding pretty hard it's arleady up
    You stop sweating -- I'm such a sweathog and my shirt and bandana would already be soaked enough that I'm not sure I would notice.
    Disorientation -- I tend to get disoriented whenever I'm on an unmarked trail anyway
    Difficult breathing -- I guess there's a difference in heavy breathing vs. difficult breathing
    High body temperature -- Probably hard to tell if you're riding hard on a hot day as well.

    I usually don't ride whenever it's over 95, and my typical rides are pretty short (<2hrs) and mostly in the shade. I'm jealous of you AZ riders who mostly enjoy dry heat... that helps a lot as well. 85 or 95, it's tough to sweat in the muggy SE summers.

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    Good info!

    The big thing I always watch for is sweat. Stop every once in a while. If you don't have sweat immediately start beading... you're headed for trouble. Drink up.

    I have started using a camelbak every time I'm on the trail to promote drinking more. With bottles, it is sometimes harder to get a drink because of the logistics of getting the bottle out while tackling the tougher stuff. Since I only use water in the camelbak (to keep from souring when I can't wash it right after a ride), it leaves my bottle cage open to put a bottle of whatever electrolyte drink I am using at the time to augment hydration.

    You can withstand the heat, you just have to be hyper-aware and extremely diligent about putting more water in than you're losing.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by GotoDengo View Post
    Difficult breathing -- I guess there's a difference in heavy breathing vs. difficult breathing
    Very much so. And thanks to allergy season rolling in, if I'm not drugged up I'd have a hell of a time riding. Congestion and a closed up throat are not conducive to aerobic exercise

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nadric View Post
    Very much so. And thanks to allergy season rolling in, if I'm not drugged up I'd have a hell of a time riding. Congestion and a closed up throat are not conducive to aerobic exercise
    /\ This year has been a brutal one for allergies.

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    I've come dangerously close to heat stroke on a couple of occasions in the past. I have not actually had it, but have had heat exhaustion (the step right before heat stroke) and have had to give aid to people flirting with the boundary, too.

    biggest deal is to get out of the heat. lay on your back with your feet up on a chair. if you have cool water available, submerge the hands or feet or run the water over the wrists/ankles. Blood vessels are close to the surface here and you can quickly cool the blood this way. cold pack on the forehead. drink water, get some electrolytes.

  7. #7
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    Good info man. I sometimes experience a sudden cooling/ loss of body heat feeling followed by dissiness if I'm overworking it but I think that is along the lines of overheating and not necessarily stroke symptoms.

  8. #8
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    watch for chills and vomiting....

    i hit both those early on in a race.....had to scale waaaay back to continue...

    it was not a fun race.....
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  9. #9
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    I've stopped sweating a couple of times. It goes something like this:

    "Wow, cool, my skin is getting dry, I must've stopped sweating. OHCRAPIMUST'VE STOPPEDSWEATING!" And then I get off the bike and sit on a log/rock/the ground in the shade and suck water until I start sweating again.
    I'm enjoying my childhood way too much to ever give it up.

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    I should know this, but I'm honestly not clear on it, especially re: the warning if you stop sweating part.

    I ~believe~ it is possible to be well hydrated and still suffer heat stroke. Or rather, by time you notice that symptom, you already HAVE heat stroke and haven't prevented it.

    I guess the thing is, to really listen to your body. Every one of us knows when our body is telling us to back off.

  11. #11
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    Friend of mine blacked out temporarily after some strenuous climbing followed by break immediately afterwards. He felt dizzy/disoriented, then the vision started to go. Sat down on a log, then on the ground leaning against it, then laid down on the ground beside it. A few minutes later he was fine. However I don't think it was hot that day.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellytronics View Post
    Friend of mine blacked out temporarily after some strenuous climbing followed by break immediately afterwards. He felt dizzy/disoriented, then the vision started to go. Sat down on a log, then on the ground leaning against it, then laid down on the ground beside it. A few minutes later he was fine. However I don't think it was hot that day.
    That is a typical response from running in the "red zone" for too long. Some very good posts, a lot of good info, thanks to everyone.

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    When I was young( many years ago) I was playing tennis on a hot day and started to shiver. Freaked me out, was definitely time to quit and cool down.

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    Having landed myself a trip to the emergency room due to heat stroke, I can assure you that my experience was not fun at all. I had a fever of 108 and had to stay in the hospital for two night.

    I was fortunate that I was not out in the woods riding. I recognized something was really wrong when I was shivering in the shower. I called my friend to give me a ride to the hospital and then passed out as I was checking myself in. Next thing I remember was waking up on my back with a fan over me, a wet rag on my forehead, wires everywhere, and a bunch of people standing around me.

    The temperature outside that day was high 60s or low 70s with low humidity. The reason i passed out was because I was doing my fitness test for military. I didn't go to medical that morning since I did not feel sick; however, I started feeling sick after lunch when the afternoon started to roll around. Well that was too late to claim illness and get out of the test since it was too late to go to medical. Thus I was compelled to do the fitness test. Let's just say that after the run I realized I felt bad that day because my digestive system was in the process of purging itself clean...

    You can prolly guess where it goes from there since all the water I drank from that day was purged rather than absorbed.
    Last edited by jseko; 06-04-2011 at 10:06 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.
    Excellent advice.

    One of the most tragic and saddest stories ever to appear here at MTBR.com was a few years ago when a MTBR member posted up that he had taken his family out on a mountain bike ride on their vacation in the heat and his teenage daughter passed away from heatstroke in spite of all attempts to revive her. I don't have a link, but I remember reading the father's story and his advice to be very aware of the heat when choosing when and how long to ride. It was a tragic loss and the story was difficult to read.

    Be careful out there.

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    Good post! In the MTB community, many are pretty aware of this - the true problem lies with the weekend warrior types.

    The situation what Bruce Brown posted is very sad.

  17. #17
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    I got the chills a couple weeks ago on a very humid day after climbing a hill. Very weird! I did stop for a few minutes until I felt normal.

  18. #18
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    In order to leak water, you have to drink water!

  19. #19
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    Didnt come up, but having had it before the symptom that you cannot fail to recognize is the earth starts to bounce, almost like its an earthquake.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    ... a MTBR member posted up that he had taken his family out on a mountain bike ride on their vacation in the heat and his teenage daughter passed away from heatstroke in spite of all attempts to revive her....
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....
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  21. #21
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    Something not mentioned in this post, probably because it's the wrong time of year for us northern hemisphere people, is that dehydration and heat stroke can also happen during cold weather.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....
    Yes, that's the story about Sylvia, CHUM. Thanks for finding that link. My eyes still well up today when I read that tragic story (that really could have happened to any of us).

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....


    Words are inadequate, thanks for posting that, maybe we can help prevent just one.

  24. #24
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    Curious, what part of AZ Mtns do you live in?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Excellent advice.

    One of the most tragic and saddest stories ever to appear here at MTBR.com was a few years ago when a MTBR member posted up that he had taken his family out on a mountain bike ride on their vacation in the heat and his teenage daughter passed away from heatstroke in spite of all attempts to revive her. I don't have a link, but I remember reading the father's story and his advice to be very aware of the heat when choosing when and how long to ride. It was a tragic loss and the story was difficult to read.

    Be careful out there.
    Wow. Thank you for sharing this tragic story. I have a young daughter and this really brings it home. Sometimes I take things too far myself, and then have to remind myself to not only protect my daughter, but to protect ME so that I can be healthy and old with her.

    Sharing my own story, I once went for a road ride, before the days of cell phones, i was way out in the country and it was brutally hot. I saw rattle snakes on the road, that hot. Anyway, by the time I realized how overheated I was, I was in the middle of nowhere and there wasn't a car in sight. I found a church, but there was no shade under its awning. I got lucky and they had an open spigot. I poured water al over myself multiple times, lay down in the surrounding trees, and eventually limped back to the car after about a 20 minute break. Worst ride of my life. Worse than the one where I broke my wrist recently.

    So, my advice, never ride alone in this heat, and, always have a charged and dry cell phone.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl View Post
    Curious, what part of AZ Mtns do you live in?
    Eastern AZ. The White Mountains, you may have seen it on the news recently.

  27. #27
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    My Family is from Clifton Morenci
    We have a family gathering at Big Lake outside of Springerville every year.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl View Post
    My Family is from Clifton Morenci
    We have a family gathering at Big Lake outside of Springerville every year.
    Hope you get to do it this year, the forest is closed right now, fire, getting larger by the hour. Might not be anything left at Big Lake after today.

  29. #29
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    That sucks AZ. Sorry.

  30. #30
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    Thanks man.

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    Thanks for the reminder and keep safe!

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    Last summer I took part in a BBQ competition at the local county fair. Started at 9:00 and by noon it was 102*. I have no clue how much water I drank that day, but it was not enough. Had a camper at hand with a/c going and I spent a lot of time inside. My wife (nurse) came over for the judging which started about 5:00. Wife was real close to hauling me to the hospital then, but instead she got me home and got me run through the cold shower and then the cold washrags on face while laying in bed with fans going. She checked on me every few minutes and re-wet the washrags as needed. Had her pretty worried.

    I have never in my life felt that bad. Like I said, I stayed in the camper most of the day and all I drank was water, but it was not enough.

    From that day on, and even up to now, I can NOT take the heat near like what I used to... Like someone said above, listen to your body.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Fragera View Post
    I have started using a camelbak every time I'm on the trail to promote drinking more. With bottles, it is sometimes harder to get a drink because of the logistics of getting the bottle out while tackling the tougher stuff. Since I only use water in the camelbak (to keep from souring when I can't wash it right after a ride), it leaves my bottle cage open to put a bottle of whatever electrolyte drink I am using at the time to augment hydration.
    One of the things I do is to drink from the C-bak when I see the guy in front of me taking a drink. It reminds me to drink.
    Hail, Satan!!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.
    Thanks for the link, much appreciated...

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    mood

    is the first thing to go south with heat and hydration.

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    Good info, thanks!

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    Thanks for the info!!!

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    Good info, thanks.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    http://www.ogrehut.com/trails.php/TheFamily/120Sylvia

    good parents...strong, experienced and responsible riders....both of them....

    it was a very sad time.....
    Nightmare scenario. What a tragic read.

    Thank you for sharing that link.

  40. #40
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    anyone from the east heading west- you will need to drink more than you normally do. Me and some friends traveled out to moab and started feeling bad. we were each drinking 1.5-2 gal a day just to feel hydrated tooling around. interesting how much of a difference the dry air makes.
    count your blessings

  41. #41
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    I had a heat stroke 5 years ago on the race track with my sportbike. Bad things happen when you have a heat stroke at 130 mph.

  42. #42
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    Feeling chilly while still sweating heavily is my body's warning sign that I'm running too hot.

    For cooling the body in an emergency, a large rock that's in the shade may help, especially if a good portion of the rock is in the ground; it will pull some heat from the body.
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

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    Bump because its important.

  44. #44
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    I've experienced what I'd call a heat stroke (not sure if that was a real heat stroke) twice. This is what I felt like:

    - Blurred vision (like when you get up fast), I saw "sparks" everywhere.
    - Weak pulse (but quite fast)
    - Sensation of pressure in the ear. Difficult hearing.
    - Couldn't keep my balance, I had to sit down.


    Was that a heat stroke?
    A pessimist is an experienced optimist

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadie scum View Post
    Bump because its important.
    After yesterday's rain, what about wet stroke???
    Hail, Satan!!

  46. #46
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    Yep, it's the dead of summer here in AZ. As in the story above, planning to come to Phoenix, Moab or Sedona or any other similar destination to ride on a vacation at this time of year is questionable. The lack of shade and abundance of rock reflects a lot of radiation back at you, and it ends up feeling a lot hotter than it is (even if it's already over 100°!). A camelback or a few waterbottles is usually NOT going to cut it, especially when help is not near. You can ride in the morning time, but you have to be ultra-careful to not be caught out there with the rising temps and diminishing water supply. Most people are NOT ready for what this heat and environment actually means and requires. Many of us go to higher ground and ride at times and distances we know will be bearable, not to maximize our riding experience or do new things necessarily. If you are planning to go to one of these places to ride in the dead of summer, look into the local boards and do a lot of research first.
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  48. #48
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    One in my group was very close to heat stroke about a month ago. He was battling heat exhaustion. Cramps, slurred speech and vomiting. I had to tow him out and back to the parking lot. It was very scary and I never let on how worried I was but I was looking for a good spot to land the helicopter on the way out.
    When I was stationed at Camp Lejeune it seemed we lost a Marine a month during the summer to heat stroke.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GatorB View Post
    One in my group was very close to heat stroke about a month ago. He was battling heat exhaustion. Cramps, slurred speech and vomiting. I had to tow him out and back to the parking lot. It was very scary and I never let on how worried I was but I was looking for a good spot to land the helicopter on the way out.
    When I was stationed at Camp Lejeune it seemed we lost a Marine a month during the summer to heat stroke.
    Yep, saw the same thing in PI.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrasmak View Post
    I had a heat stroke 5 years ago on the race track with my sportbike. Bad things happen when you have a heat stroke at 130 mph.
    Ouch

  51. #51
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    Good tips.

    I ride slower in the heat, knowing I can't push as hard (at fifty, this means really slow). Seems like every group that stops to rest immediately hop on their bikes as I go by and then want to pass me. Then they have to stop again after a short distance and I ride by them again.

  52. #52
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    rofl thats funny... I live in new mexico c I ussually start rides when its about 95f. its really not hot enough but we cant wait for jul/aug to ride now can we? ussually drink about 140L of water a ride and go through "heat stroke" as I call it multiple times a ride. Symptoms include: face pumping with blood, sweat passing dew rag into eye's, entire body arms and legs covered with about 2mm of sweat, head has pounding in 2 area's kinda like a migraine and my ears are ringing. then the climbing is done I stop come out of the furnace for a second, and start a cooling decent that gives me just enough break before it all starts again... and I wonder how I can be eating 3000 cal meals and still be loosing weight... gotta ride hard in the heat. trick is to consume water, sunblock, dew rag, proper cycling apparel. DO NOT LET THE SUN SCARE YOU FROM RIDING!!!!!!! maybe ride little less time just get out there..

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    thanks! i always wondered what i would need to look for when riding in the heat.

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    Rode Hurkey Creek yesterday at 3:30. Dunno what the temp was, but mustave been about 90.

    The meadows are unprotected (in the sun) and the wind was on my back so it seemed still. It was quite hot. I drank a lot, and slowed my pace a little.

    It wasn't really that uncomfortable, just hot. I'm still trying to acclimate. I prefer Spring, Winter and Fall here in So Cal.

    I've had heat stroke though. Did a hike/bike in Day canyon once in Rancho Cucamonga in August. Didn't drink enough. I was laid up in bed for 2 days. Chills, fever, vomiting, etc etc. Not fun.

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    90 Degrees :O Oh noes!! I bet you have trees and grass and all that stuff too

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    and I wonder how I can be eating 3000 cal meals and still be loosing weight
    This is what I notice the most. I routinely ride during the afternoon in 100+ degree temps here in North Texas. The heat doesn't bother me and I don't go any slower but for several hours afterwards I can't get enough to eat.

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    I coached high school track and cross country from the 80's to '02. Another thing that happens I didn't see mentioned is that your skin often feels clammy when you're undergoing heat exhaustion. Hydration is extremely important. I was a fanatic about keeping myself, my assistants, and the kids hydrated and in Maryland there are enough days in the 90's when running long distances or working hard intervals is dangerous for anyone who doesn't. On 90's+ hot days. I'd post coolers of ice water, cups, and a trash bag on willing people's property, a willing 7-11's parking lot, etc. along practice routes. Cycling, stay hydrated as well. I freeze a juice box then bury it in a towel in my car when I drive to a trail to cycle on a hot day even though I take a similarly-treated water bottle of water with me so I also have something cold at the end of the ride.

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    I rode for two hours in the Texas heat today and could not stop thinking about the young pro motocross racer that died from heat stroke last weekend at Red Bud. He crashed early in the race then spent a lot of time and energy trying to get his bike started then continued on with the race. He was only out there for only thirty minutes and it took his life.

    I slowed way down on the climbs today and drank all of the 100oz in the camelback.

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    I got it a bit yesterday on a 38 mile race, unfortunately I did not realize that sweating extra hard is also a symptom, I was watching myself for signs I knew about dizzyness, confusion, ect, finally 22 miles in I just had enough, at about that same time I had quit sweating so good call on my part. Dont be afraid to throw in the towel, it really isnt worth it for ego or to prove yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.

    Link
    How to Recognize the Warning Signs of Heat Stroke - Associated Content from Yahoo! - associatedcontent.com
    Thank you for the post! I am in my late 40's, and got back into riding just 2 months ago. I have been riding 10-30 mile rides here in Southern California mostly on the flat stuff, with several Mountain rides in the 10 mile range.

    I am training for an upcoming MTB Vacation in the Sierra's, so today I decided to ride the SART trail from Norco to San Bernardino, and back to the car. It was 103 degrees here today. I left with a full Camelback 100 oz, a full 20 oz Bottle of PowerAde, some fruit, and Gu.

    I started around 0820 this morning, and headed out on what would be my longest mileage ride on a MTB ever. I used to race road bikes some 25 years ago, and 50lbs ago, so I guess I have something to prove to myself. What an idiot. About 15 miles out, I felt a little light headed, but was drinking often. A Roadie passed by while I was resting, and asking if I was ok, so I thanked him. I made it to the very end of the SART trail, and after a few minute break, turned around after taking pictures of the trail end. I would stop from time to time and shoot a quick narrative video from my Droid.

    About at mile 25, I really started to feel sick. I stopped to take a break and shoot a quick video, and I usually tell the date and time as I shoot. I could not remember the month, and stated " I'ts November 7" when it was really September 7 (today). My speech was slurred too. I thought to myself what was that all about! I rode on, and around mile 35 I really hit the wall. I was taking in tons of water, even stopping at a park and drinking theirs so I would not deplete my Camelback. I ate a banana, and even after a 3-4 minute break, could not get rid of the sick feeling in my stomach like I was going to hurl. I stopped sweating, I was having a hard time catching my breath too. I rode on. Finally, I made it back to my car at mile 39.31, and got inside the car and ran the AC. I was dizzy, and felt close to passing out. And I was alone. I drove home, and still even now at 638 pm PST, still feel like crap, but better than I did. I'm drinking 1/2 water, 1/2 Gatorade.



    Sorry for the long post, but this Heat Stroke or whatever I have is no joke. I was stupid. I should not have gone out in this heat, and not for close to 40 miles. Thanks again to the OP, and my thoughts go out to the Family who lost their little Girl. Take care and be safe!!!

  61. #61
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    A sign i noticed when pushing close is you can feel your pulse in the back of your head, like throbbing

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    This should be a sticky on every area

  63. #63
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    Bump because its relevant.

  64. #64
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    Should be made into a sticky

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurr View Post
    Should be made into a sticky


    /\ Agree, how do we get it done? Mods?

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    Dusty Chaps - Heat Stroke - YouTube.
    Heatstroke, The Dusty Chaps
    agmtb

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    I almost had heat stroke once, i think technically it was heat exhaustion. Ever since then temperature hasnt bothered me. I love extreme heat now and cold doeant bother me as much.

    It was a weird but cool experience...although quite dangerous.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by GotoDengo View Post

    Rapid pulse -- if you're riding pretty hard it's arleady up
    You stop sweating -- I'm such a sweathog and my shirt and bandana would already be soaked enough that I'm not sure I would notice.
    Disorientation -- I tend to get disoriented whenever I'm on an unmarked trail anyway
    Difficult breathing -- I guess there's a difference in heavy breathing vs. difficult breathing
    High body temperature -- Probably hard to tell if you're riding hard on a hot day as well.
    I usually have all those symptoms anyway...I dont rely on anything to tell me when I'm about to have a heat stroke - I just know, and slow down accordingly.
    DJ, "Because I'm sure the world need's more dudes stalking the woods stoned out of their mind carrying a deadly weapon."

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    Been close to HS a couple of times. No fun at all.

  70. #70
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    This is a story from a few years back that really rocked the local Charleston tri scene:

    Story in Yahoo! Groups

    The Post and Courier - Google News Archive Search

    Here was a physician that knew the symptoms. All he had to do was listen to his body, but he didn't. There was race pressure to finish near the top.


    One of the best warning signs is "sticky palms". Yes, it sounds like a joke which is why you will remember it. When you are sweating, your hands stay wet. Once you stop sweating, they become tacky. Stop immediately and rest even if you are a few hundred yards from the finish. It could save your life.

  71. #71
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    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt but don't want to wear it.

    One thing to remember is electolyte imbalance is a contributing factor.
    If you are drinking large quantities of water and sweating profusely you will also be losing salts, so you need to replace them.

    If you don't like gatoraide or simialar, one old trick is to add a pinch of salt, sugar and a couple drops of lemon juice to the plain water in the camelback. This helps keep the electrolytes in balance as you sweat.

    michael
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  72. #72
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    I have been close to HS not cool at all. Not something I care to experience ever again. Good thing to check is that your camelback in not leaking the one day I was rushing and not looking everything over that's what I get get. Riding 6 miles back in 90 degrees with nothing to drink Lesson learned for me...

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    Ideally, if a man is 200 lbs. he should end the ride weighing 200 lbs. This is due to the constant fluid intake. More people have heat stroke per year than hypothermia. Probably do to the fact that we actually are warm blooded and most enjoy the warmer weather. You should start and end the ride with your urine running fairly clear. If you drink enough liquid during the ride it will.

  74. #74
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    Great tips. Felt it coming on a couple of times last year when biking in 110+ weather. As soon as I noticed I shut it down and called it a day. Have to listen to your body.

  75. #75
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    A couple years back, did an epic in July. Got a late start, around 7:30am. By 10am it was 105F, and the monsoon was in full swing here in AZ. About 3 miles from my home, got the chills, stopped sweating, running nose, did the vomiting, etc. Having the chills when it's now 110? not good.

    to make matters worse, I looked up and 3 buzzards were circling around overhead. I was afraid to wash my face over in one of irrigation canals, being fearful of passing out while bending over, and falling in.

    I stopped under a freeway overpass, and waited in the shade for a bit. I made it home safely, but swore I'd never do that again.

    No more late starts in the Summer, and I'll leave the epics for Fall, Winter, and Spring...

  76. #76
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    I had this happen twice last year and thanks to knowing the symptoms and how my body operates under extreme stress, I was able to recognize what was happening and dial things back enough to where I could slowly ride it out.

    One piece of advice: if you feel like you are getting sick, don't go too far off trail to find cool running water or shade. I found a kid suffering from heat exhaustion last year by accident. I had slowed myself and was pedaling through a very thick section of old pines. I happened to look over and saw a bike laying roughly 50ft off the trail. I stopped, walked over, and found the kid laying under one of the pines trying to cool down. That section is pretty high speed and normally I would have never seen him there. Dumb luck at it's finest.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    watch for chills and vomiting....

    i hit both those early on in a race.....had to scale waaaay back to continue...

    it was not a fun race.....

    This happens when it's too late. The headachesstarts first(for me). Hydrate ,Hydrate ,Hydrate !!!

    ****Awsome thread!****
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  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by skullcap View Post
    I've stopped sweating a couple of times. It goes something like this:

    "Wow, cool, my skin is getting dry, I must've stopped sweating. OHCRAPIMUST'VE STOPPEDSWEATING!" And then I get off the bike and sit on a log/rock/the ground in the shade and suck water until I start sweating again.
    Oh man this has happen to me also
    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  79. #79
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    Thanks indeed for posting that story. My 10-year-old daughter is soooo looking forward to going riding with me as soon as i get her bike fixed up. I can't imagine what that family must have gone through.

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    Great advice

    It's important to listen to you body.

  81. #81
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    Great information! Thanks!

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    Last August after doing a 1 hour skills clinic I decided to put in 13 miles at about 2pm. It was 112* and 85% humidity, all the while the trail i was on ran along a nice wet bayou so it felt like riding on the sun. 8-9 miles in I realized I had no more water or Gatorade and I wasnt sweating anymore! Scared the **** outta me. I stopped under a bridge and layed there for a good 30 minutes before I was able to muster up the energy to ride back to the truck. Not a fun time! Now I have a camelback Hawg and 2 of the 3 liter reservoirs for summer riding! Gotta love Houston riding in the summer!
    Who cares if your helmet matches your bike? And for the love of god, please use the search feature!

  83. #83
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    Thanks for the info

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    Quote Originally Posted by ARCHAIC View Post
    Last August after doing a 1 hour skills clinic I decided to put in 13 miles at about 2pm. It was 112* and 85% humidity, all the while the trail i was on ran along a nice wet bayou so it felt like riding on the sun. 8-9 miles in I realized I had no more water or Gatorade and I wasnt sweating anymore! Scared the **** outta me. I stopped under a bridge and layed there for a good 30 minutes before I was able to muster up the energy to ride back to the truck. Not a fun time! Now I have a camelback Hawg and 2 of the 3 liter reservoirs for summer riding! Gotta love Houston riding in the summer!
    Last summer on a road ride (80 miles in Az), I drank ~ 150 oz of fluids over 4 hours and still lost close to 6 lbs. The thing to remember is that if it's hot enough your sweat evaporates quickly or it's so humid you can't notice it, you may not notice if you actually stop sweating.

    John

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    Hi there forum users,

    My name's Joseph and Im a student currently in my fourth (and final) year studying industrial design, For my final paper I am looking into designing some form of cooling device to be used while Mountain biking, If anyone could possibly spare a few minutes of your time to fill out this small survey it would be very very much appreciated. Its just an early Survey to explore the different user groups.

    surveytool.com/s/S31FDF274D

    I want to design and develop a device that could reduce the chance of heatstroke and the problems that come with it. I will start a blog when the development takes place for any of you who may be interested

    Any feedback will be also much appreciated

    thanks guys!
    joseph

  86. #86
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    I want to design and develop a device that could reduce the chance of heatstroke and the problems that come with it. I will start a blog when the development takes place for any of you who may be interested

    Any feedback will be also much appreciated

    thanks guys!
    joseph[/QUOTE]

    Have you looked at the 661 Core Cooler? It does help. Proper hydration and autumn help more. By the look of the site they may not make them much longer, maybe something better. There are multiple brands of cooling vests but haven't tried one.
    agmtb

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    hey thanks That 661 core cooler seems like a great idea! My lecturer actually discussed with me the possibilities of a product similar to this. I was thinking of some form of helmet cooling to reduce the temperature of the head. . . I know my head starts to boil on a reasonably warm day. Does anyone else have that issue??

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonut View Post
    hey thanks That 661 core cooler seems like a great idea! My lecturer actually discussed with me the possibilities of a product similar to this. I was thinking of some form of helmet cooling to reduce the temperature of the head. . . I know my head starts to boil on a reasonably warm day. Does anyone else have that issue??



    OP here, please feel free to start another thread and stop hijacking this one. TIA.

  89. #89
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    I have found that if you take one lowdose asprin a day it will thin your blood and help you a stay cooler, especially in the desert.

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    another cure for the hot weather is mix HEED from Hammer and drink up when you

  91. #91
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    heat is my kryptonite.. have had heat exhaustion 3 times (working construction). have realized that I
    need to have evaporative cooling in addition to the usual hydration and electrolytes, so I am going to order a cool medics vest. also there is hyper kewl cycling vest - maybe some of you are familiar with it.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktrail View Post
    I have found that if you take one lowdose asprin a day it will thin your blood and help you a stay cooler, especially in the desert.
    Aspirin does NOT thin your blood. It inhibits the ability for platelets to stick together, thus helping prevent clots from forming.

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    Thinning Blood

    I stand corrected ,Thanks for the Medical explanation
    KG

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    Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke.

    IDENTIFYING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION


    Profuse sweating with pale, cool skin.

    Weakness or faintness.

    Dizziness.

    Headache.

    Loss of appetite.

    Heat cramps.

    Nausea (with or without vomiting).

    Chills ("gooseflesh").

    Rapid breathing.

    Urge to defecate.

    Tingling in hands or feet.

    Mental confusion.

    TREATMENT OF HEAT EXHAUSTION



    Position the casualty to lie on his back in the shade with his legs elevated (normal shock position).

    Remove the casualty's clothing around his neck and waist and loosen his boots.

    Pour water over the casualty and fan him to cool his body faster.

    Have the casualty slowly drink one quart (one canteen) of cool water.

    If the casualty cannot drink the water because of nausea or if he vomits, seek medical attention.

    If the casualty recovers, have him perform only light activity for the remainder of the day.

    IDENTIFYING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT STROKE


    Skin that is hot, dry, and red.

    Headache.

    Weakness.

    Dizziness.

    Mental confusion.

    Nausea or stomach pains.

    Seizures.

    Weak and rapid pulse and respiration.

    Sudden loss of consciousness.

    TREATMENT OF HEAT STROKE

    Heat stroke is a medical emergency. In heat stroke, the body's internal (core) temperature increases to dangerous levels. If the casualty's body temperature is not lowered quickly, brain injury or death may result.

    Send someone to get medical help while you work with the casualty.

    Move the casualty to a cool, shaded area or improvise a shade.

    Loosen or remove the casualty's outer garments.

    Position the casualty on his back with his feet elevated while pouring cool water over the casualty, fanning him vigorously, and massaging his arms and legs with cool water. Mist is more effective than pouring water.

    Have the casualty slowly drink one quart of cool water if he is able.

    Evacuate the casualty as soon as possible.

    Do not delay evacuation in order to start cooling measures. Perform cooling measures en route to the medical treatment facility.

    Monitor the casualty's breathing. Administer mouth-to-mouth resuscitation if needed.

  95. #95
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    I imagine most know this info but there are a couple of points that I did not see mentioned.

    Food. If you do not eat enough it will increase your chance of becoming a heat casualty.
    People don't eat as much when they are hot and this is often a contributing factor.

    Putting water on someone is fine. If there is a stream or running water near by DO NOT PUT THE VICTIM IN IT. They will often start to shiver, and shivering can be a result of skin temp not core temp and shivering is a natural response intended to warm up the body. If they start to shiver and it is not quickly stopped it will most likely kill them.

    Hydration does not start the morning of or the day prior. Good hydration starts days prior.

  96. #96
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    Speaking from experience, when you get heat stroke you will not have a doubt in your mind. Its not fun.

  97. #97
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    Heatstroke? in fact whats this heat thing you speak of? not a problem we have in Ireland,more likely to drown than suffer heatstroke.

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    heathe

    Quote Originally Posted by Gng View Post
    Heatstroke? in fact whats this heat thing you speak of? not a problem we have in Ireland,more likely to drown than suffer heatstroke.
    That's because in Dublin, for example, the avg high in the summer is 22 c (71 F) In Riverside (inland Southern California) where I live the avg high is 37 C (99 F)

    There are places like Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Texas where the temps get even higher and 99 degrees is considered a cool day to go mountain biking

    The avg high in Phoenix in July is 106F (41C)
    Last edited by osmarandsara; 04-22-2012 at 11:23 PM.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kneescar View Post
    I had this happen twice last year and thanks to knowing the symptoms and how my body operates under extreme stress, I was able to recognize what was happening and dial things back enough to where I could slowly ride it out.

    One piece of advice: if you feel like you are getting sick, don't go too far off trail to find cool running water or shade. I found a kid suffering from heat exhaustion last year by accident. I had slowed myself and was pedaling through a very thick section of old pines. I happened to look over and saw a bike laying roughly 50ft off the trail. I stopped, walked over, and found the kid laying under one of the pines trying to cool down. That section is pretty high speed and normally I would have never seen him there. Dumb luck at it's finest.
    I've done a long ride where I've had to "pull off" and stop due to dehydration on an AZ ride. I knew my limits, but out or nearly out of water and close to the end, I knew it wouldn't be worth it to risk pushing it. We had a "pick up van" for this organized ride, and I got the "ride-of-shame" the few miles in, but that's way better than dying. This was on the side of the road and I made sure that I was visible. That was one of my first years in AZ, still, know your limits and don't ever get close to pushing them. 100oz/hr is completely possible in these environments, and sustained activity can be very difficult to impossible. At that water-intake rate, salts become very critical as well.

    The biggest issue is that people simply don't realize how hot it can be, how the radiant energy affects you without trees, and that you can't go on for hours or be real far in a trail system in the heat of the summer. Lots of people operate under the assumption that "1 camelback is fine" and then proceed on a 2-3hr ride, which under the brutal conditions turns into a longer ride, which when coupled with the lack of availability of resources (water, food, salt, shade) turns into a longer and dangerous/life threatening ride. Realize that the people that frequent these climates make some pretty big compromises and lifestyle changes to ride in said conditions, such as waking up at 4am, doing a short late evening ride when the sun is low (can be the hottest time, but less radiant energy helps), crazy pre-hydration, significantly more than 60 or 100oz of water, and CLIMATE ADAPTATION. All too often, someone gets the idea that "I have x amount of time, so I should be able to get a ride in!". Bad idea without all the above prep.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  100. #100
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    One of the first clues when you are riding is a loss of energy, along with increased heat intolerance. I've been in a couple of races when I know it's hot outside, I'm hot and drinking water like crazy, but my biggest clue is always watching my power, strength and energy just go downhill really fast. It's like someone pulling the plug. When that happens, I know I am very close to totally overheating and need to get cool, get water and take a break. P.S. Coconut juice is one of the BEST electrolyte replacement drinks you can get.

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