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  1. #151
    Making due...
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    After reading this post I've decided to postpone my planned evening ride in lieu of 105F heat here in KC. I rode in 92F heat earlier this week and was really hitting a brick wall on some of the climbs that I normally get over with relative ease.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjkm View Post
    Close call today here in the AZ desert. I drank an electrolyte mix on the way to the TH and took two bottles with me + two gels. I felt great until about mile 20 and then started to get worried a bit later about not having enough to get back to the car. I was riding in a more remote part of the park and had not seen anyone in a while. I had almost 6 miles to go and really just a few sips until I was totally out.

    I balanced then need to keep my HR down with my need to keep moving forward. Toward the end I walked some of the hills and coasted the downhill. I got back to car without incident but was reminded of the importance of being properly prepared for summer riding here. It turned into a mental exercise to just keep going as my mind racing about the 'what if's"

    I rode 30 miles total and in hind site, should have cut it short as I started 40 minutes later then I planned last night. I will bring a 3rd bottle for this ride again or break out the camelback, which I have grown to not like riding with.

    I never stopped sweating, had too high of a HR or any of the symptoms of a heat emergency, but I was getting close. My fall back was to piss in the empty bottle and sip it on the way out. Gross, but I would have done it if it came down to it.

    Got away with one today, I will be better prepared next time.
    I would say that 2 bottles is way too little for AZ, especially in the heat we are having, and for 30 miles it borders on suicidal. I am very happy you are OK, and 'got away with it'. Others may not be so lucky.
    Thanks for sharing this, it could well help others see the folly of thinking they are prepared when they may be woefully unprepared. I would never go out without at least 150 oz of water for anything between 2 to 3 hours, and if more, at least 200 oz. Even if I do not need it, I could meet someone who does. (See my previous story here)...
    It's all Here. Now.

  3. #153

  4. #154
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    drink water

    drink a electrolyte mix make it a bit salty too

    this post is all about the post count

  5. #155
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    I have kind of a hard time with this do to the fact that i have asthma but no matter what im always sure to drink tons of water and i had a questions about the electrolyte stuff would Gatorade work or do you need something better and stronger then that?

  6. #156
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    Don't forget the Big 4:

    1) Calcium
    2) Magnesium
    3) Sodium
    4) Potassium

    You need them replaced when you are dehydrated.

  7. #157
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    I have so little body fat I can dehydrate ez. I almost need a gatoraid IV attacked to me.

    First thing I look for is when I stop sweating. When that happens, better get something in you fast.

  8. #158
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    Thanks for the effective information.

  9. #159
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    Plenty of heat here in Eastern VA!

  10. #160
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    Had a close call today when biking. Very humid. I took a break, sat down, took of my backpack, shirt, helmet, and dumped a little water to wet my hair. I called home to see if my bro could pick me up in case I didn't feel better, I was in the middle of town forest. But after sitting for 5 minutes I began to feel better and was able to continue. Continued to drink water slowly though and took it easy.

    Everyone be safe and smart, and have fun!

  11. #161
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    It's always good to bike with someone else in this season, and of course, bring plenty of cold water or Gatorade. And make sure your helmet provides sufficient air circulation to keep your head cool enough - otherwise, it's a death trap. I generally don't go out biking if it's 90-95 or above outside, because New England humidity makes the temp feel like over 100 F. Don't overestimate yourself in the heat and humidity - I've passed out from the heat more than once, and it is definitely NOT fun. If you begin to feel yourself get dizzy/whoozy or lose awareness, STOP, get off your bike, lie down (preferably in shade), and make sure you your legs are lifted (put a log or backpack under legs) to promote circulation. DO NOT push yourself. It isn't worth getting into an accident and ending up in the hospital, or worse. If you pass out, you may also go into shock - and when you wake up, you will feel an intense urge to drink. DO SO - drink as much as you need. If you start vomiting or your skin looks pale, it would probably be a good idea to call 911 (or have someone, like a bike companion, do it for you), which is why it's always a good idea to carry a cell phone. One of the worst parts about passing out is that you may not remember what happened to you, or you may not even remember who you are/where you are at first - it can get scary.
    If you plan to bike in unfamiliar territory, take a map and orienteering compass with you - biking with someone who is familiar with the area is even better.
    If you're biking alone, BE EXTRA CAREFUL.
    Be prepared and plan for the worst.
    Last edited by SpecializedWindsor; 07-18-2012 at 07:29 PM.

  12. #162
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    I have seriously lost some motivation to ride these past two weeks. Temps have been lows of 70, and highs of 95, with the dewpoint remaining consistantly between 68-72 degrees. So no matter when I ride I get drenched in sweat and it won't evaporate. Ride in the morning and it's 100% humidity, ride in the afternoon and it's hot with 60% humidity. I believe that I am honestly getting sick of having pruney hands at the end of my rides with no ability to cool off.

    I havn't had heat exhaustion or heat stroke, but this is getting old. I also work as a mechanic in an auto shop with no A/C so that certainly doesn't help with the motivation factor, but at least I am acclimated to it.

    It also doesn't help that I have to drive for an hour or more to ride trails that provide a good change of pace.

  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurr View Post
    Didnt come up, but having had it before the symptom that you cannot fail to recognize is the earth starts to bounce, almost like its an earthquake.
    I had a friend that had the same symptoms right before her face went completely white and lips turned dark purple. After sitting down and drinking some water the symptoms where gone as fast as they came. She was left with a killer headache, though.

  14. #164
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    Drink lots of water and watch out for the heat

  15. #165
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    Heat Disorders

    Sad thing about any heat trauma is that once you have had a serious bout of it, you are susceptible to overheating the rest of your life. Sad but true?? Research it.

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Single Trak Mind View Post
    Sad thing about any heat trauma is that once you have had a serious bout of it, you are susceptible to overheating the rest of your life. Sad but true?? Research it.
    Very true. I am an hvac technician by day and when I use to repair and install residential hvac I ended up getting heat exhaustion twice. The first time was unbearable. I ended up with clammy palms(another indicator), dry mouth, stopped sweating and my body temperature was high.

    A year later the same thing happen, this time it kicked in quicker than before. Last Saturday my friend and I went on a ride in the mountains (100f-105f temps) and I ended up getting heat exhaustion. But I haven't rode in years, it was a 17 mile round trip through rocky hills.

  17. #167
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    here's how

    1.bp.blogspot.com/-cHOX94vCHhk/UCCZ5PJHgtI/AAAAAAAAAfU/E30a8SOK2no/s1600/totalrecall09-e1287688768273.jpg

  18. #168
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    Good information. The big thing I always watch for is sweat. Stop every once in a while. If you don't have sweat immediately start beading... you're headed for trouble. Drink up.......

    Thank you
    Bizworldusa

  19. #169
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    Good post

  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by bizworldusa View Post
    Good information. The big thing I always watch for is sweat. Stop every once in a while. If you don't have sweat immediately start beading... you're headed for trouble. Drink up.......

    Thank you
    Bizworldusa
    If you have ceased sweating, you're already in big trouble. Call 911.

    -heat cramps - painful muscle spasms; electrolyte imbalance causes muscle cramps
    -TX: remove from hot area, rest muscle, replace fluids by mouth
    -heat exhaustion - cold clammy flushed skin, dry tongue, thirst, pulse can increase, BP decrease, SHOCK!
    -TX: oxygen, shock position, water slowly, transport
    -heat stroke - body unable to lose heat; hot dry skin, altered level of consciousness, low BP, pulse rate rapid then slows, 105F+ = death
    -TX: active cooling measures ice packs to neck, armpits groin; donít cause shivering

    -in elderly, diabetes, alcohol, malnutrition, Parkinsonís, hyperthyroidism & obesity increase risk of heat stroke




    Notes from an environmental lecture from my Paramedic School

  21. #171
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    The last time I was out (plus 100 degrees) I got the chills and goose bumps. But that's not one of the symptoms? What is it?

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by stubble88@gmail.com View Post
    The last time I was out (plus 100 degrees) I got the chills and goose bumps. But that's not one of the symptoms? What is it?
    not saying this is what happened, but shock is defined as low perfusion throughout the body, consequently, you could feel cold (especially in the extremities). There are different levels of shock, as well as different kinds, so nobody can say exactly what it was without witnessing it firsthand.

    Personally, if something that strange happened to me, I would just stop, sit out for an hour or so, hydrate, and see how I felt.

  23. #173
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    Watch out for the heat

  24. #174
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    I have found that the replacement drinks are good, but the trick is a constant (as constant as possible) into level. Instead of that, "I'm thirsty" binge gulp action, I use a camel-back and sip-a-long almost without thinking. No hydration issues as of yet!

  25. #175
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    Good info. Thanks.

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