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  1. #101
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    I once ran out of water in 108* breezeless heat and had to ditch my bike (it sat for a week), hiking down a steep, dry waterfall through poison oak and nettle four miles back to the highway where I collapsed.

    Once I stopped sweating, my thought process broke down to the point of confusion, but I knew I had to keep from panicking. At one point, I was pondering where to stash my body for recovery. Out in the open, where it would easily be seen from the air, or stash it under a rock so the critters wouldn't drag it to where it couldn't be located. At the time, I'd been riding for over 20 years; mostly solo, and absolutly no one knew remotely where I was.

    I started the ride cocky, confident and sure of my skills.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I once ran out of water in 108* breezeless heat and had to ditch my bike (it sat for a week), hiking down a steep, dry waterfall through poison oak and nettle four miles back to the highway where I collapsed.

    Once I stopped sweating, my thought process broke down to the point of confusion, but I knew I had to keep from panicking. At one point, I was pondering where to stash my body for recovery. Out in the open, where it would easily be seen from the air, or stash it under a rock so the critters wouldn't drag it to where it couldn't be located. At the time, I'd been riding for over 20 years; mostly solo, and absolutly no one knew remotely where I was.

    I started the ride cocky, confident and sure of my skills.
    -- WOW ! just reading this makes me feel sick... what a nasty bit you went through. just curious if you live in the desert southwest ?

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by zazzafrazz View Post
    -- WOW ! just reading this makes me feel sick... what a nasty bit you went through. just curious if you live in the desert southwest ?
    I live in the Mojave Desert, and heat really doesn't effect me. I ride Sedona around the 4th of July to avoid the crowds for example, and ride all day.

    This happened in the Southern Sierra near Kernville. For those familiar with the area, I rode from Goldledge Campground to Sherman Pass, to Rincon Trail, and bailed down Packsaddle Canyon. All because I couldn't find someone to do Cannell with and it's advised not to do that trail alone.

    A week after this, my girlfriend and I drove up to retrieve the bike. We parked the car at 5:30 AM and hiked up the dry waterfall/canyon. I had triangulated the location of my bike before ditching it, or so I had thought. It took an hour to locate the bike and I almost abandoned the search before I saw a silver flash from the polished rear triangle. In my confusion the week before I realized I had done around five triangulations. On the way back down, I pointed out a recess in the cliffside to my girlfriend and told her that's one of the spots where I thought of stashing my body. She replied that she was thinking of doing that exact same thing right about then. She was pi$$ed, and not because of the morning hike. When we got back to the car around 9:00AM it was already 100*.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  4. #104
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    ^^^ ha ha ! that's funny "... girlfriend stashing your body..." Geez 100+ at 9am . ick.
    North Sierra gets hot too but prolly not like down Kern way.

  5. #105
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    You need too watch out for heart exhaustion now that you have it your body is usefully more prone to our. Thank God, your ok .

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by j.rioux View Post
    You need too watch out for heart exhaustion now that you have it your body is usefully more prone to our. Thank God, your ok .
    yep that was about to turn deadly. my t tolerance is waaay down ever since my heat e

    exhaustion episode. i am super high maintenance when it comes to temps over 70/75.

  7. #107
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    I thank the Lord have never had it. However, I know a few people who have. It takes upwards of 6months take year to heal up.

  8. #108
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    awesome post

  9. #109
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    Just wanted to say thanks for the warning signs. Yesterday it was 85 and a nice breeze when I started my ride. I filled up my Hydrapack (fits 3 liters?) since I knew it was hot and filled my water bottle with Gatorade. I stopped off at the gas station, picked up another gatorade, Twinkies and a beef jerky stick.

    I was surprised at how fast you can run out of energy while just doing a simple trail at 10 mph. That was the scary part. The heat really takes it toll physically and emotionally. The Twinkies were actually a wonderful addition when I realized it wasn't just water I needed. I made it back to the car, but I know I was starting to deal with heat exhaustion 3/4 of the way home. If I hadn't turned around when I did, I would have been a lot worse off.

    I don't think anyone plans to not take the heat seriously, you just don't think it will happen to you. Or you don't realize how fast it can set in.

    I sat in the air conditioned car talking to my brother, finished off the other gatorade and came home.

  10. #110
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    Great post! Thanks for the info!

  11. #111
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    i had heat stroke as a kid and have never been able to tolerate the heat since. having had it makes one more susceptible in the future as well.

    i aint shy about drinking water, nor about taking breaks. my buddies can go do another lap for all i care, im gonna chill until i feel right again. had a couple bouts of heat exhaustion when i was a framing carpenter, back in my 20s, and it took days to recover. i never want to experience that again.

  12. #112
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    Had heat stroke one time, was on an island called Pelee island in Ontario. didn't bring enough water and ran out half way through the ride, got back and couldn't keep anything down. Had to go to the hospital. ALWAYS bring enough water now, with the water bottles and the 1.5L water backpack I have. Great thread, good to educate people.

  13. #113
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    diddnt kno that

  14. #114
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    I totally agree- I had all those symptoms on my first ride Monday!!!!

  15. #115
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    Heat stroke

    Thanks for the reminder,I'm starting to ride this year after 10 yrs off,I am 51 yrs old and a little nervous! I still like to compete

  16. #116
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    Great Topic. After reading this I'm thinking of carrying some powdered Gatorade in my pack to add to a water bottle in case it's needed. I try to drink at least 20oz per/hr while riding on a mild day and probably double that when it's over 100 outside. I recently discovered that Coconut Water, Raisins, Peanuts, and Dried Apricots are all good sources of Potassium to prevent heat cramps and muscle cramps while on a long ride. A little more practical to bring along than bananas or milk.

  17. #117
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    Great post....Riding in texas for the next few months is gonna be rough, thank god for shade

  18. #118
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    just drink a lot of water

  19. #119
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    I was out Saturday morning on one of my long solo rides up in the Tortolitas near my home here, and about 10 am as I was climbing up the Wild Mustang trail about 3 hours into my ride, I came upon a group of hikers on their way down. There was an older couple who looked like they had the hiking gear, and 3 younger people with them. The temp was around 90 degrees, not too hot for Tucson. I chatted with them for a few minutes, and they asked me the quickest way back to the TH down by the Ritz resort, as they were a little out of their way. I told them the quickest way back, and as I spend a lot of time up there, I am sure my directions were as exhaustive as possible. It was not difficult to find the way back, there are plenty of signs, and it should only have taken them about 90 mins to get back to the TH. They were chatty and cheerful, no sign of any distress.
    I left them and continued up the trail, and about 20 mins later when I got to the top of the climb, I thought that the younger people with them did not look very well prepared for that hike. They were not carrying much with them. I toyed with the idea of going back down to give them some of my water, but then thought that the older couple with them did have packs and bottles, so I carried on back home.
    Next morning I saw this:

    Woman dies while hiking Tortolita Mountains : Welcome to StarNet - Tucson, Arizona

    These were the people I had met. My gut did a few backflips, and I couldn't help but wonder if I could have been more helpful, if my directions had contributed to their tragedy, or if the small amount of water I might have been able to give them would have helped in any way. I have no way of knowing this, and as a friend pointed out, I may have helped avert a worse tragedy... All I can do is know that we all need to be very mindful of this killer condition, know how to recognise the signs, and be super-vigilant with yourself, your immediate companions, and anyone else you come across who you have any concern for. I always carry at least 200 oz of water on any longer, 3 hours or more, ride, and always have it in more than one container in case of rupture. I carry my own trail mix made with dates, raisins, mixed nuts etc and some powdered electrolyte for emergency. I am also going to start carrying some of those cool packs that can be started in an emergency too.
    Just yesterday I saw that a German tourist had died in the Tucson Mountain Park the very next day on a hike. 2 in 2 days, and it is not even that hot here yet.

    Be careful out there!!!
    It's all Here. Now.

  20. #120
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    Force down a liter an hour with electrolytes.

    Bring a heart rate monitor. Dehydration will manifest itself as an unusually high heart rate during a ride. I will get the elevated heart rate about an hour before cramps and before reduced cognitive ability, so this is a good early sign. When I say elevated, I mean it will be pushing 20 bpm more than normal for a given exertion level. When I see this happen, it's followed by cramps, then physical exhaustion and diminished mental sharpness.

    Plan all rides around water sources. I carry up to 5L of water and if I will be out longer, I will make sure my route takes me past water sources (camp grounds, gas stations, back to the car, water tanks, friend's houses etc.). The best sources are spigots where you can run your head under the water.

    Just don't ride in heat over 100, it's just not worth it. Period.

    Last Saturday we road over the mountains in Tucson. We had a slow member in the group and the grueling ride (20 miles and 5300' of slow climbing jeep trails) was over his limit. We only planned for 4 hours, but waiting for him to catch up cost us too much water. There were stream crossings with running water to cool us off, but it still took twice as long as expected and it was about 100 out when we finished. Very dangerous, especially since heat stroke can kill you the next day out of nowhere. Know your abilities and limitations.

    Trust that the members of your group won't get you into trouble.
    John

  21. #121
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    thx. great points.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by GotoDengo View Post
    Good points. Scary part is a lot of the "sudden onset" symptoms might be hard to recognize when riding.

    Rapid pulse -- if you're riding pretty hard it's arleady up
    You stop sweating -- I'm such a sweathog and my shirt and bandana would already be soaked enough that I'm not sure I would notice.
    Disorientation -- I tend to get disoriented whenever I'm on an unmarked trail anyway
    Difficult breathing -- I guess there's a difference in heavy breathing vs. difficult breathing
    High body temperature -- Probably hard to tell if you're riding hard on a hot day as well.

    I usually don't ride whenever it's over 95, and my typical rides are pretty short (<2hrs) and mostly in the shade. I'm jealous of you AZ riders who mostly enjoy dry heat... that helps a lot as well. 85 or 95, it's tough to sweat in the muggy SE summers.
    Humidity is better then dry heat

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikonator View Post
    Humidity is better then dry heat



    High humidity inhibits the bodies ability to cool itself through evaporation of sweat. So dry heat is truly better, at least in terms of staying cool.

  24. #124
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    Hikers

    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    I was out Saturday morning on one of my long solo rides up in the Tortolitas ..... Just yesterday I saw that a German tourist had died in the Tucson Mountain Park the very next day on a hike. 2 in 2 days, and it is not even that hot here yet.
    Be careful out there!!!
    Unless the hikers explicitly told you "hey, we are in trouble over here" how were you supposed to know one of them was in real bad shape.???...What sucks about that story in the Tortolitas is that the Aunt and Uncle (who were locals) should have made sure everyone in their group was prepared for the conditions....

    People just need to give the desert the respect it deserves.....I've backpacked for days at a time in the Grand Canyon in 110 degree heat and came back alive........folks need to have respect for the harsh desert environment and prepare adequately for the conditions,

  25. #125
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    I've come close twice while living in the southeast. The dry climate is much better your sweat actually works here rather than just pool up and not evaporate.
    Signs for me were getting dizzy, really weak, then seeing stars, then vomiting. Both happened while doing yard work. The second time I almost didn't make it into the house, feels like my blood pressure drops out. Climbed in the shower clothes and all and opened it up on cold, might not be the best idea, so I've been told but worked twice for me. I was drinking plenty of water both times but in some climates it's not enough. I find soaking my shirt with a cold bottle of water does more good than anything else in certain situations.

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