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  1. #151
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    After reading this post I've decided to postpone my planned evening ride in lieu of 105F heat here in KC. I rode in 92F heat earlier this week and was really hitting a brick wall on some of the climbs that I normally get over with relative ease.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjkm View Post
    Close call today here in the AZ desert. I drank an electrolyte mix on the way to the TH and took two bottles with me + two gels. I felt great until about mile 20 and then started to get worried a bit later about not having enough to get back to the car. I was riding in a more remote part of the park and had not seen anyone in a while. I had almost 6 miles to go and really just a few sips until I was totally out.

    I balanced then need to keep my HR down with my need to keep moving forward. Toward the end I walked some of the hills and coasted the downhill. I got back to car without incident but was reminded of the importance of being properly prepared for summer riding here. It turned into a mental exercise to just keep going as my mind racing about the 'what if's"

    I rode 30 miles total and in hind site, should have cut it short as I started 40 minutes later then I planned last night. I will bring a 3rd bottle for this ride again or break out the camelback, which I have grown to not like riding with.

    I never stopped sweating, had too high of a HR or any of the symptoms of a heat emergency, but I was getting close. My fall back was to piss in the empty bottle and sip it on the way out. Gross, but I would have done it if it came down to it.

    Got away with one today, I will be better prepared next time.
    I would say that 2 bottles is way too little for AZ, especially in the heat we are having, and for 30 miles it borders on suicidal. I am very happy you are OK, and 'got away with it'. Others may not be so lucky.
    Thanks for sharing this, it could well help others see the folly of thinking they are prepared when they may be woefully unprepared. I would never go out without at least 150 oz of water for anything between 2 to 3 hours, and if more, at least 200 oz. Even if I do not need it, I could meet someone who does. (See my previous story here)...
    It's all Here. Now.

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  4. #154
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    drink water

    drink a electrolyte mix make it a bit salty too

    this post is all about the post count

  5. #155
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    I have kind of a hard time with this do to the fact that i have asthma but no matter what im always sure to drink tons of water and i had a questions about the electrolyte stuff would Gatorade work or do you need something better and stronger then that?

  6. #156
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    Don't forget the Big 4:

    1) Calcium
    2) Magnesium
    3) Sodium
    4) Potassium

    You need them replaced when you are dehydrated.

  7. #157
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    I have so little body fat I can dehydrate ez. I almost need a gatoraid IV attacked to me.

    First thing I look for is when I stop sweating. When that happens, better get something in you fast.

  8. #158
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    Thanks for the effective information.

  9. #159
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    Plenty of heat here in Eastern VA!

  10. #160
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    Had a close call today when biking. Very humid. I took a break, sat down, took of my backpack, shirt, helmet, and dumped a little water to wet my hair. I called home to see if my bro could pick me up in case I didn't feel better, I was in the middle of town forest. But after sitting for 5 minutes I began to feel better and was able to continue. Continued to drink water slowly though and took it easy.

    Everyone be safe and smart, and have fun!

  11. #161
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    It's always good to bike with someone else in this season, and of course, bring plenty of cold water or Gatorade. And make sure your helmet provides sufficient air circulation to keep your head cool enough - otherwise, it's a death trap. I generally don't go out biking if it's 90-95 or above outside, because New England humidity makes the temp feel like over 100 F. Don't overestimate yourself in the heat and humidity - I've passed out from the heat more than once, and it is definitely NOT fun. If you begin to feel yourself get dizzy/whoozy or lose awareness, STOP, get off your bike, lie down (preferably in shade), and make sure you your legs are lifted (put a log or backpack under legs) to promote circulation. DO NOT push yourself. It isn't worth getting into an accident and ending up in the hospital, or worse. If you pass out, you may also go into shock - and when you wake up, you will feel an intense urge to drink. DO SO - drink as much as you need. If you start vomiting or your skin looks pale, it would probably be a good idea to call 911 (or have someone, like a bike companion, do it for you), which is why it's always a good idea to carry a cell phone. One of the worst parts about passing out is that you may not remember what happened to you, or you may not even remember who you are/where you are at first - it can get scary.
    If you plan to bike in unfamiliar territory, take a map and orienteering compass with you - biking with someone who is familiar with the area is even better.
    If you're biking alone, BE EXTRA CAREFUL.
    Be prepared and plan for the worst.
    Last edited by SpecializedWindsor; 07-18-2012 at 07:29 PM.

  12. #162
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    I have seriously lost some motivation to ride these past two weeks. Temps have been lows of 70, and highs of 95, with the dewpoint remaining consistantly between 68-72 degrees. So no matter when I ride I get drenched in sweat and it won't evaporate. Ride in the morning and it's 100% humidity, ride in the afternoon and it's hot with 60% humidity. I believe that I am honestly getting sick of having pruney hands at the end of my rides with no ability to cool off.

    I havn't had heat exhaustion or heat stroke, but this is getting old. I also work as a mechanic in an auto shop with no A/C so that certainly doesn't help with the motivation factor, but at least I am acclimated to it.

    It also doesn't help that I have to drive for an hour or more to ride trails that provide a good change of pace.

  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurr View Post
    Didnt come up, but having had it before the symptom that you cannot fail to recognize is the earth starts to bounce, almost like its an earthquake.
    I had a friend that had the same symptoms right before her face went completely white and lips turned dark purple. After sitting down and drinking some water the symptoms where gone as fast as they came. She was left with a killer headache, though.

  14. #164
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    Drink lots of water and watch out for the heat

  15. #165
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    Heat Disorders

    Sad thing about any heat trauma is that once you have had a serious bout of it, you are susceptible to overheating the rest of your life. Sad but true?? Research it.

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Single Trak Mind View Post
    Sad thing about any heat trauma is that once you have had a serious bout of it, you are susceptible to overheating the rest of your life. Sad but true?? Research it.
    Very true. I am an hvac technician by day and when I use to repair and install residential hvac I ended up getting heat exhaustion twice. The first time was unbearable. I ended up with clammy palms(another indicator), dry mouth, stopped sweating and my body temperature was high.

    A year later the same thing happen, this time it kicked in quicker than before. Last Saturday my friend and I went on a ride in the mountains (100f-105f temps) and I ended up getting heat exhaustion. But I haven't rode in years, it was a 17 mile round trip through rocky hills.

  17. #167
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    here's how

    1.bp.blogspot.com/-cHOX94vCHhk/UCCZ5PJHgtI/AAAAAAAAAfU/E30a8SOK2no/s1600/totalrecall09-e1287688768273.jpg

  18. #168
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    Good information. The big thing I always watch for is sweat. Stop every once in a while. If you don't have sweat immediately start beading... you're headed for trouble. Drink up.......

    Thank you
    Bizworldusa

  19. #169
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    Good post

  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by bizworldusa View Post
    Good information. The big thing I always watch for is sweat. Stop every once in a while. If you don't have sweat immediately start beading... you're headed for trouble. Drink up.......

    Thank you
    Bizworldusa
    If you have ceased sweating, you're already in big trouble. Call 911.

    -heat cramps - painful muscle spasms; electrolyte imbalance causes muscle cramps
    -TX: remove from hot area, rest muscle, replace fluids by mouth
    -heat exhaustion - cold clammy flushed skin, dry tongue, thirst, pulse can increase, BP decrease, SHOCK!
    -TX: oxygen, shock position, water slowly, transport
    -heat stroke - body unable to lose heat; hot dry skin, altered level of consciousness, low BP, pulse rate rapid then slows, 105F+ = death
    -TX: active cooling measures ice packs to neck, armpits groin; don’t cause shivering

    -in elderly, diabetes, alcohol, malnutrition, Parkinson’s, hyperthyroidism & obesity increase risk of heat stroke




    Notes from an environmental lecture from my Paramedic School

  21. #171
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    The last time I was out (plus 100 degrees) I got the chills and goose bumps. But that's not one of the symptoms? What is it?

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by stubble88@gmail.com View Post
    The last time I was out (plus 100 degrees) I got the chills and goose bumps. But that's not one of the symptoms? What is it?
    not saying this is what happened, but shock is defined as low perfusion throughout the body, consequently, you could feel cold (especially in the extremities). There are different levels of shock, as well as different kinds, so nobody can say exactly what it was without witnessing it firsthand.

    Personally, if something that strange happened to me, I would just stop, sit out for an hour or so, hydrate, and see how I felt.

  23. #173
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    Watch out for the heat

  24. #174
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    I have found that the replacement drinks are good, but the trick is a constant (as constant as possible) into level. Instead of that, "I'm thirsty" binge gulp action, I use a camel-back and sip-a-long almost without thinking. No hydration issues as of yet!

  25. #175
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    Good info. Thanks.

  26. #176
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    Thanks for the very helpful information.

  27. #177
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    For years on many endurance events like the Tahoe Sierra 100, 8 hr Races and the Death Ride I have suffered hydration issues and heat stroke and exhaustion.

    My symptoms are heavy fatigue and nausea and a couple of times I had chills and I vomit. Usually when I vomit, I vomit a full stomach load of fluids, which I guess is the result of the digestion stopping and dehydration worsening. I think I have my hydration, nutrition and pace dialed, but this problem happens too often.

    I shoot for the recommended 17-25 ounces/ hr, electrolytes and <240 cal/ hr of a endurance fuel, but success is hit or miss. Some 6-8 hr training rides have been total successes, but sticking to the same plan I have had some major flops. Altitude may be a factor, since I live low a and some of these flops have been at high altitude, but I have bonked bad at relatively low altitude too.

  28. #178
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    Yeah here in Florida, it get really hot and humid, Thanks for this guide...

  29. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirvalve View Post
    First step is prevention. There are two types of heat stroke. One is sudden onset and the second is lack of fluids in your body. Both can be deadly. Prevention starts with making sure you are hydrated. If you know you will be doing an activity in the heat and sun star drinking extra water as much as 24 hours in advance. For breakfast eat salty foods and make sure you have extra sports drinks chalked full of electrolytes.

    Wear light colored and weight clothing to allow your skin to breath and sweat. A major sign of heat stroke is that you stop sweating.

    Prevention of heat stroke is very important. Continue to drink water and sports drinks and eat salty snacks throughout the day to replenish what your body loses during the activities.
    I have also read research that drinking EXTRA water and salty foods can through you off too. Water intoxication is the term and according to the research it is very common and just as bad as too little. When I get the time I will site the research, but it can be found on the Hammer website.

  30. #180
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    good to know

  31. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirvalve View Post
    If you know you will be doing an activity in the heat and sun star drinking extra water as much as 24 hours in advance.
    This is what I wanted to post from Hammer that is contradictory to other recommendations in this thread:

    SODIUM – Don’t consume extra sodium (salt) in the hopes that you’ll be “topping off your body stores” prior to the race. Since the average American already consumes approximately 6000 to 8000 mg per day (if not more), an amount well above the upper end recommended dose of 2300-2400 mg/day, there is absolutely no need to increase that amount in the days prior to the race. (Hint: Adopting a low-sodium diet will do wonders for both your health and athletic performance). High sodium intake, especially in the days leading up to the race, is a recipe for disaster because it will greatly increase the potential for disruption of the hormonal mechanisms that control sodium regulation, re-circulation, and conservation. In the days leading up the race, be especially cognizant of the salt content in your foods, especially if you go out to eat. Dining out can easily increase your already-high salt intake dramatically (into double figures!).

    Also, you need other minerals besides salt. Also, Excess Hydration is #1 on the list of Top Mistakes made by athletes.

  32. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It's that time of year, learn to recognize the signs of heat stroke so hopefully you can avoid it.
    Be careful in the heat and humidity.
    symptoms I get when doing something strenuous in the heat:
    the last time I got this is when I pushed my broken-down car a block and into a Safeway parking lot 4 summers ago and it was 100+ outside!

    1. palpitating heart
    2. short-winded; very bad sometimes, feels like I am dying
    3. severe headaches
    4. nervousness
    5. dizziness
    6. weakness

  33. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonmyrlebailey View Post
    symptoms I get when doing something strenuous in the heat:
    the last time I got this is when I pushed my broken-down car a block and into a Safeway parking lot 4 summers ago and it was 100+ outside!

    1. palpitating heart
    2. short-winded; very bad sometimes, feels like I am dying
    3. severe headaches
    4. nervousness
    5. dizziness
    6. weakness
    +1 to the headaches, dizziness, and weakness. I would add lightheadedness and nausea. I also live in Florida and suffered heat exhaustion not long ago. Very un-fun. Felt like I was going to die. You may want to keep something with electrolytes around like Emergen-C. Obviously, preventing it is easiest, but try to get out of the heat, hydrate, and rest. No award for toughness if you die.

  34. #184
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    Drink water!!!!

  35. #185
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    Thanks

  36. #186
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    Great post and lots of good info.
    killroy thanks for the tips. I have seen too many people get preventable heat injuries due to ignorance. I second the overhydration as that can easily lead to hyponatremia and other unpleasantness. The excess salt issue is also on point.

    I also recommend people stay away from commercial "sports" drink, energy drinks, and anything with aspartame or other artificial sweetners in it.

    Since i do lots of work outside i have had to be very aware of heat injuries.

  37. #187
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    there is some very usefull info here although here in the uk we only see the sun for about 2 days a year so not much danger of heat stroke

  38. #188
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    heat stroke

    ive come pretty close myself over The past couple years, mostly in climates i'm unfamiliar with. From arizona, im used to riding In the dry heat. When i got stationed in savannah, ga i started riding the way i normally did. Got a pretty bad Case of heat exhaution, almost dumped my bike in the river i was riding next to.my problem was i forgot to Bring extra water with me to account for my body adjusting To the climate change. made The same mistake twice, actually. Brought my bike with me when i deployed, and got a bad Case of the cramps on my 3rd lap around Bagram. Now I Won't ride anywhere without at least a 2liter camelbak and A gatorade in the bottle mount. Always have liquids available!!

  39. #189
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    At this time of the year, unless you live down
    under you don't need to worry about it. Just ride
    and have fun.

  40. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy View Post
    For years on many endurance events like the Tahoe Sierra 100, 8 hr Races and the Death Ride I have suffered hydration issues and heat stroke and exhaustion.

    My symptoms are heavy fatigue and nausea and a couple of times I had chills and I vomit. Usually when I vomit, I vomit a full stomach load of fluids, which I guess is the result of the digestion stopping and dehydration worsening. I think I have my hydration, nutrition and pace dialed, but this problem happens too often.

    I shoot for the recommended 17-25 ounces/ hr, electrolytes and <240 cal/ hr of a endurance fuel, but success is hit or miss. Some 6-8 hr training rides have been total successes, but sticking to the same plan I have had some major flops. Altitude may be a factor, since I live low a and some of these flops have been at high altitude, but I have bonked bad at relatively low altitude too.
    Sorry to tell you, but I reckon you have probably cooked your temperature regulating centres in your hypothalamus. As has been stated here earlier, heat stroke can permenently damage those parts of your brain, leaving you more vulnerable to further episodes. Your body won't regulate body temperature as well anymore.

    I suspect i have done the same.

  41. #191
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    At my age..I'm due for a stroke if I don't take care of my body and health soon

  42. #192
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    Useful info here

    Thank you

  43. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    At one point, I was pondering where to stash my body for recovery. Out in the open, where it would easily be seen from the air, or stash it under a rock so the critters wouldn't drag it to where it couldn't be located. At the time, I'd been riding for over 20 years; mostly solo, and absolutly no one knew remotely where I was.
    Satellite PLB is always in a jersey pocket if I am away alone.

    Will not save you from a heat stroke though.

  44. #194
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    This is off the topic of heat stroke, but I'm looking for advice. I have torn some meniscus in my right knee and will probably need arthoscopy. After that, I want to 1) keep cycling and 2) be a good boy and not re-injure my knee.

    Questions:
    1) Do I have to give up mountain biking and go strictly road biking because the jarring through the pedals could reinjure the meniscus?

    2) Would a full suspension bike absorb the jarring that would otherwise hurt my knees, or does fs just help the back and the bum?

    3) What adjustments, both in my style of riding or in my bike, should I make so that my knees remain healthy after recovery?

    Thanks for your input. Please spread my question far and wide. I really do want to be responsible from here on out.

    Sincerely,
    Bongani Rudy Poglitsh

  45. #195
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    I think that the best advice is to consistently drink small amounts of water. I learned this the hard way when we would do loops and I would not bring water with. I figured we were only out for 45 min per loop I would just drink when I got back to the truck. I did this many times until I did it on a day that was a bit to hot. Next thing I knew I felt dizzy and like I was going to through up. Had to stop for the day and it took me a full 24 hours to fully recover. Bottom line is I now have a small camel pack that I ride with at all times. As a plus it gives me a place to put first aid kit and a few tools as well.

    The whole idea of drinking too much water gets blown out of proportion. It can happen, but it is unlikely. If this is something that worries you just drink small amounts consistently. Try to avoid not drinking, followed by pounding down a bottle of water.

  46. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bongani View Post
    Questions:
    1) Do I have to give up mountain biking and go strictly road biking because the jarring through the pedals could reinjure the meniscus?

    2) Would a full suspension bike absorb the jarring that would otherwise hurt my knees, or does fs just help the back and the bum?

    3) What adjustments, both in my style of riding or in my bike, should I make so that my knees remain healthy after recovery?
    1) I find road riding no less jarring. 2) My knees feel easier on FS 3) better fitting bike. I found that when running an adjustable seatpost I can run it higher for pedalling/spinning sections and it is much easier on the knees than a compromised lowered position that works for both pedaling and technical bits.

  47. #197
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    Thanks for the input

    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    1) I find road riding no less jarring. 2) My knees feel easier on FS 3) better fitting bike. I found that when running an adjustable seatpost I can run it higher for pedalling/spinning sections and it is much easier on the knees than a compromised lowered position that works for both pedaling and technical bits.
    Thank you, Axe, for your input. It does help me get an idea of what I should do next.
    Bongani

  48. #198
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    Used to work for Team AZ for track days. ((Sport bikes). Have had to rough days where I consumed massive amounts of Gatorade and didn't pee once. 140+ on the Tarmac is no joke for 8 hrs. Lightheaded, nauseous, and near delirious I hopped in an ice cold bath at home and slammed pedialyte! No bueno!

  49. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Words are inadequate, thanks for posting that, maybe we can help prevent just one.
    Horrible. I've done this to myself, putting my parents in jeopardy of going through this.

  50. #200
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    Great tips here guys ! I almost got heatstroke once when I was in a different country. Its definitely some serious stuff! The best thing to do (well for me at least) is to stop pedaling and just coast. The wind should cool you down a bit .. and be sure to drink some water

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