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  1. #76
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    I had this happen twice last year and thanks to knowing the symptoms and how my body operates under extreme stress, I was able to recognize what was happening and dial things back enough to where I could slowly ride it out.

    One piece of advice: if you feel like you are getting sick, don't go too far off trail to find cool running water or shade. I found a kid suffering from heat exhaustion last year by accident. I had slowed myself and was pedaling through a very thick section of old pines. I happened to look over and saw a bike laying roughly 50ft off the trail. I stopped, walked over, and found the kid laying under one of the pines trying to cool down. That section is pretty high speed and normally I would have never seen him there. Dumb luck at it's finest.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    watch for chills and vomiting....

    i hit both those early on in a race.....had to scale waaaay back to continue...

    it was not a fun race.....

    This happens when it's too late. The headachesstarts first(for me). Hydrate ,Hydrate ,Hydrate !!!

    ****Awsome thread!****
    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by skullcap View Post
    I've stopped sweating a couple of times. It goes something like this:

    "Wow, cool, my skin is getting dry, I must've stopped sweating. OHCRAPIMUST'VE STOPPEDSWEATING!" And then I get off the bike and sit on a log/rock/the ground in the shade and suck water until I start sweating again.
    Oh man this has happen to me also
    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  4. #79
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    Thanks indeed for posting that story. My 10-year-old daughter is soooo looking forward to going riding with me as soon as i get her bike fixed up. I can't imagine what that family must have gone through.

  5. #80
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    Great advice

    It's important to listen to you body.

  6. #81
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    Great information! Thanks!

  7. #82
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    Last August after doing a 1 hour skills clinic I decided to put in 13 miles at about 2pm. It was 112* and 85% humidity, all the while the trail i was on ran along a nice wet bayou so it felt like riding on the sun. 8-9 miles in I realized I had no more water or Gatorade and I wasnt sweating anymore! Scared the **** outta me. I stopped under a bridge and layed there for a good 30 minutes before I was able to muster up the energy to ride back to the truck. Not a fun time! Now I have a camelback Hawg and 2 of the 3 liter reservoirs for summer riding! Gotta love Houston riding in the summer!
    Who cares if your helmet matches your bike? And for the love of god, please use the search feature!

  8. #83
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    Thanks for the info

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARCHAIC View Post
    Last August after doing a 1 hour skills clinic I decided to put in 13 miles at about 2pm. It was 112* and 85% humidity, all the while the trail i was on ran along a nice wet bayou so it felt like riding on the sun. 8-9 miles in I realized I had no more water or Gatorade and I wasnt sweating anymore! Scared the **** outta me. I stopped under a bridge and layed there for a good 30 minutes before I was able to muster up the energy to ride back to the truck. Not a fun time! Now I have a camelback Hawg and 2 of the 3 liter reservoirs for summer riding! Gotta love Houston riding in the summer!
    Last summer on a road ride (80 miles in Az), I drank ~ 150 oz of fluids over 4 hours and still lost close to 6 lbs. The thing to remember is that if it's hot enough your sweat evaporates quickly or it's so humid you can't notice it, you may not notice if you actually stop sweating.

    John

  10. #85
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    Hi there forum users,

    My name's Joseph and Im a student currently in my fourth (and final) year studying industrial design, For my final paper I am looking into designing some form of cooling device to be used while Mountain biking, If anyone could possibly spare a few minutes of your time to fill out this small survey it would be very very much appreciated. Its just an early Survey to explore the different user groups.

    surveytool.com/s/S31FDF274D

    I want to design and develop a device that could reduce the chance of heatstroke and the problems that come with it. I will start a blog when the development takes place for any of you who may be interested

    Any feedback will be also much appreciated

    thanks guys!
    joseph

  11. #86
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    I want to design and develop a device that could reduce the chance of heatstroke and the problems that come with it. I will start a blog when the development takes place for any of you who may be interested

    Any feedback will be also much appreciated

    thanks guys!
    joseph[/QUOTE]

    Have you looked at the 661 Core Cooler? It does help. Proper hydration and autumn help more. By the look of the site they may not make them much longer, maybe something better. There are multiple brands of cooling vests but haven't tried one.
    agmtb

  12. #87
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    hey thanks That 661 core cooler seems like a great idea! My lecturer actually discussed with me the possibilities of a product similar to this. I was thinking of some form of helmet cooling to reduce the temperature of the head. . . I know my head starts to boil on a reasonably warm day. Does anyone else have that issue??

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonut View Post
    hey thanks That 661 core cooler seems like a great idea! My lecturer actually discussed with me the possibilities of a product similar to this. I was thinking of some form of helmet cooling to reduce the temperature of the head. . . I know my head starts to boil on a reasonably warm day. Does anyone else have that issue??



    OP here, please feel free to start another thread and stop hijacking this one. TIA.

  14. #89
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    I have found that if you take one lowdose asprin a day it will thin your blood and help you a stay cooler, especially in the desert.

  15. #90
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    another cure for the hot weather is mix HEED from Hammer and drink up when you

  16. #91
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    heat is my kryptonite.. have had heat exhaustion 3 times (working construction). have realized that I
    need to have evaporative cooling in addition to the usual hydration and electrolytes, so I am going to order a cool medics vest. also there is hyper kewl cycling vest - maybe some of you are familiar with it.

  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktrail View Post
    I have found that if you take one lowdose asprin a day it will thin your blood and help you a stay cooler, especially in the desert.
    Aspirin does NOT thin your blood. It inhibits the ability for platelets to stick together, thus helping prevent clots from forming.

  18. #93
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    Thinning Blood

    I stand corrected ,Thanks for the Medical explanation
    KG

  19. #94
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    Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke.

    IDENTIFYING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION


    Profuse sweating with pale, cool skin.

    Weakness or faintness.

    Dizziness.

    Headache.

    Loss of appetite.

    Heat cramps.

    Nausea (with or without vomiting).

    Chills ("gooseflesh").

    Rapid breathing.

    Urge to defecate.

    Tingling in hands or feet.

    Mental confusion.

    TREATMENT OF HEAT EXHAUSTION



    Position the casualty to lie on his back in the shade with his legs elevated (normal shock position).

    Remove the casualty's clothing around his neck and waist and loosen his boots.

    Pour water over the casualty and fan him to cool his body faster.

    Have the casualty slowly drink one quart (one canteen) of cool water.

    If the casualty cannot drink the water because of nausea or if he vomits, seek medical attention.

    If the casualty recovers, have him perform only light activity for the remainder of the day.

    IDENTIFYING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT STROKE


    Skin that is hot, dry, and red.

    Headache.

    Weakness.

    Dizziness.

    Mental confusion.

    Nausea or stomach pains.

    Seizures.

    Weak and rapid pulse and respiration.

    Sudden loss of consciousness.

    TREATMENT OF HEAT STROKE

    Heat stroke is a medical emergency. In heat stroke, the body's internal (core) temperature increases to dangerous levels. If the casualty's body temperature is not lowered quickly, brain injury or death may result.

    Send someone to get medical help while you work with the casualty.

    Move the casualty to a cool, shaded area or improvise a shade.

    Loosen or remove the casualty's outer garments.

    Position the casualty on his back with his feet elevated while pouring cool water over the casualty, fanning him vigorously, and massaging his arms and legs with cool water. Mist is more effective than pouring water.

    Have the casualty slowly drink one quart of cool water if he is able.

    Evacuate the casualty as soon as possible.

    Do not delay evacuation in order to start cooling measures. Perform cooling measures en route to the medical treatment facility.

    Monitor the casualty's breathing. Administer mouth-to-mouth resuscitation if needed.

  20. #95
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    I imagine most know this info but there are a couple of points that I did not see mentioned.

    Food. If you do not eat enough it will increase your chance of becoming a heat casualty.
    People don't eat as much when they are hot and this is often a contributing factor.

    Putting water on someone is fine. If there is a stream or running water near by DO NOT PUT THE VICTIM IN IT. They will often start to shiver, and shivering can be a result of skin temp not core temp and shivering is a natural response intended to warm up the body. If they start to shiver and it is not quickly stopped it will most likely kill them.

    Hydration does not start the morning of or the day prior. Good hydration starts days prior.

  21. #96
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    Speaking from experience, when you get heat stroke you will not have a doubt in your mind. Its not fun.

  22. #97
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    Heatstroke? in fact whats this heat thing you speak of? not a problem we have in Ireland,more likely to drown than suffer heatstroke.

  23. #98
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    heathe

    Quote Originally Posted by Gng View Post
    Heatstroke? in fact whats this heat thing you speak of? not a problem we have in Ireland,more likely to drown than suffer heatstroke.
    That's because in Dublin, for example, the avg high in the summer is 22 c (71 F) In Riverside (inland Southern California) where I live the avg high is 37 C (99 F)

    There are places like Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Texas where the temps get even higher and 99 degrees is considered a cool day to go mountain biking

    The avg high in Phoenix in July is 106F (41C)
    Last edited by osmarandsara; 04-22-2012 at 11:23 PM.

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kneescar View Post
    I had this happen twice last year and thanks to knowing the symptoms and how my body operates under extreme stress, I was able to recognize what was happening and dial things back enough to where I could slowly ride it out.

    One piece of advice: if you feel like you are getting sick, don't go too far off trail to find cool running water or shade. I found a kid suffering from heat exhaustion last year by accident. I had slowed myself and was pedaling through a very thick section of old pines. I happened to look over and saw a bike laying roughly 50ft off the trail. I stopped, walked over, and found the kid laying under one of the pines trying to cool down. That section is pretty high speed and normally I would have never seen him there. Dumb luck at it's finest.
    I've done a long ride where I've had to "pull off" and stop due to dehydration on an AZ ride. I knew my limits, but out or nearly out of water and close to the end, I knew it wouldn't be worth it to risk pushing it. We had a "pick up van" for this organized ride, and I got the "ride-of-shame" the few miles in, but that's way better than dying. This was on the side of the road and I made sure that I was visible. That was one of my first years in AZ, still, know your limits and don't ever get close to pushing them. 100oz/hr is completely possible in these environments, and sustained activity can be very difficult to impossible. At that water-intake rate, salts become very critical as well.

    The biggest issue is that people simply don't realize how hot it can be, how the radiant energy affects you without trees, and that you can't go on for hours or be real far in a trail system in the heat of the summer. Lots of people operate under the assumption that "1 camelback is fine" and then proceed on a 2-3hr ride, which under the brutal conditions turns into a longer ride, which when coupled with the lack of availability of resources (water, food, salt, shade) turns into a longer and dangerous/life threatening ride. Realize that the people that frequent these climates make some pretty big compromises and lifestyle changes to ride in said conditions, such as waking up at 4am, doing a short late evening ride when the sun is low (can be the hottest time, but less radiant energy helps), crazy pre-hydration, significantly more than 60 or 100oz of water, and CLIMATE ADAPTATION. All too often, someone gets the idea that "I have x amount of time, so I should be able to get a ride in!". Bad idea without all the above prep.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  25. #100
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    One of the first clues when you are riding is a loss of energy, along with increased heat intolerance. I've been in a couple of races when I know it's hot outside, I'm hot and drinking water like crazy, but my biggest clue is always watching my power, strength and energy just go downhill really fast. It's like someone pulling the plug. When that happens, I know I am very close to totally overheating and need to get cool, get water and take a break. P.S. Coconut juice is one of the BEST electrolyte replacement drinks you can get.

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