• 11-17-2012
    Kona0197
    What about when the thief grinds off the serial number?
  • 11-17-2012
    David C
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kona0197 View Post
    What about when the thief grinds off the serial number?

    Then it's not easy to sell it to any honest pawnshop or individual... C'mon, who with enough common sense on earth would buy a nice bike for good price from a guy who don't even have proof of possession of said bike and with the SN grinder down ??
  • 11-17-2012
    Kona0197
    People buy bikes from other people all the time without checking for a SN or checking the SN in case the bike is stolen.
  • 11-17-2012
    David C
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kona0197 View Post
    People buy bikes from other people all the time without checking for a SN or checking the SN in case the bike is stolen.

    Well usually when I buy a bike for more than $100, I take time to check those details... Buying an old beater for $20 might not require a SN verification, but since I take note of all my bikes, it's normal that I'll get a glance at the SN anyway and seeing it to be grinded off is just a dead giveaway...

    Don't always play the innocent ;)
  • 11-17-2012
    LWright
    Engrave your drivers license number onto the bb shell and inside of the dropouts. Any LEO can find you with this number.
  • 11-18-2012
    DIRTJUNKIE
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LWright View Post
    Engrave your drivers license number onto the bb shell and inside of the dropouts. Any LEO can find you with this number.

    Great idea but the crook just grinds it off along with the SN. Maybe a rolled up preace of paper with that number stashed inside the seat tube. But that's only going to prove it's yours upon then finding it. The problem here is any crook that has half a brain is going to eliminate any obvious ways of identifying the bike. Anything such as #s gets ground off.
  • 11-18-2012
    David C
    I was told that many urban thief are kept off bikes that are covered with stickers and decals, since it's so much work to take them off they'll just go look for another bike to steal, of course we're talking commuter/urban rides, not your $$$$ MTB or roadbiek.

    Make sense to me that if I had to spend a few hours trying to get all the stickers off to make $60 on a bike, I'd look for an easier one to resale.
  • 11-19-2012
    bigbadwulff
    Humboldt Co? Isn't that Marijuana central? Hmm, I guess there are side effects from weed after all. Not that you'll hear this in the media. WAKE UP PEOPLE!
  • 11-19-2012
    ddublu
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wsmac View Post
    mark it with your DNA... can't see it, can't copy it :thumbsup::D

    I know people get excited about their bikes but wow.....that's a bit much....I could never do that on/to my bike. :-)
  • 11-25-2012
    bfrank02
    Solid advice - had my 2010 Giant Trance X3 stolen from the back of my truck in Clovis (Fresno) this weekend at the State CIF cross country race. Bastards cut through my cable lock within 30 minutes of leaving the bike. Called the cops and filed a report - also had pictures but did not have the serial number - STUPID!!!!
  • 11-27-2012
    ncrippen
    5 Attachment(s)
    Need help with this year/model BMX Redline Racing Bike...have pics and serial #
    Hello,

    Please help be find the year and model, so I can make sure to get the right replacement parts.

    I bought this little used BMX racing bike with a Redline Frame, GT Wheels and a one piece crank set.

    I can't figure out what year and model the frame is.

    The serial # HN0125291 stamped in the bottom of the Bottom Bracket. The bike as been spray painted white and has non redline parts as well.

    Thank you so much,

    Nan Crippen
    Long Beach, CA
  • 11-27-2012
    AlexDeLarge
    The seatpost is a good place to hide some info, but it could likely get wet.
    I opt to write the info on a piece of paper, roll it up, put it in a small Ziplock baggie, and place it in the handlebar.
    What I write on the paper:
    Bike make/model/SN/color/frame size/any distinguishing marks
    Date and place purchased/their address/phone number/salesman name, even
    My name and phone number if it's recovered.
    Never had a bike stolen, and hope I never do.
    I also make a few copies of the sales receipt. What usually happens over time is the ink fades, so copies really come in handy.
  • 11-27-2012
    gelo354
    i did it, first time to do before ride my bike..........
  • 11-28-2012
    MarkMac
    I've been a cop since 2007, and see bikes stolen all the time. Specifically, I see all sorts of stuff stolen all the time.

    You need to have S/N's on file.

    Countless suburban kids get new bikes Christmas morning. Countless ghetto kids get new bikes the morning after Christmas.

    Possession IS 9/10th's the law. If the owner is lucky enough to see the kid who stole his bike riding across the tracks, there is nothing I can do unless the owner can PROVE the bike is his. Knowing the serial number is instant validation. Plus when you make your report, the police will enter the S/N into NCIC and if in the future an officer sees a suspicious person and runs the bike, if it's entered into the , it'll be flagged and you'll get it back. Maybe it'll be in a day, maybe in 10 years. Maybe it'll be trashed, maybe it'll have titanium hardware and a CF wheel set. You get it in the condition the police recover it.

    I recently recovered a simple flatbed trailer, it had been modified into an industrial theft trailer. The trailer had been outfitted to steal large industrial components so the metal could be scrapped for fast cash. The owner got her s trailer back, fairly beat up, with a hoist, ratchet come-along and an oxy/aceteleyne rig mounted. The thief convinced the court he didn't know the trailer was stolen, so the theft case was dismissed. Unfortunately, the thief couldn't prove the welding equipment and gear on the trailer was his (not knowing the S/N goes both ways) and the original owner inherited all the thief's burglary tools. The trailer owner told me the equipment wasn't his, but it's not like I'm going to unbolt a hoist and oxy/acetelyne rig from a trailer, stuff it in the trunk of my patrol car, and take it to the impound. I'm not wasting taxpayer money to roll a tow truck for a hoist and a welder, so I told the trailer owner to hold onto it, and if he doesn't hear anything within a reasonable time, to consider the equipment his.

    I like that story because it's a rare instance where some justice was served.


    At any rate, I record the S/M's of all my hardware... My guns, computer, cell phone, tablet, digicam, GPS, etc. I keep the S/Ns on an Excel file on my PC, which I drag and drop onto my smart phone... Because if you don't have a redundant copy and the burglar swipes your PC you'll be hosed.

    BTW, don't expect the possessor of your stolen property to be convicted. Short of a confession, it's almost impossible to prove the suspect KNOWINGLY possessed stolen property. At least with the S/N you may get it back.


    If it's got a S/N, write it down.
  • 11-28-2012
    MarkMac
    Also, when you stop at Subway for lunch after your ride, park your vehicle where it's in front of a window. Then sit where your bike is in your field of view.

    Go someplace else if you see a suspicious person lurking, or if you wanna be stubborn at least make eye contact. Trust your instinct. Situational awareness, yadda yadda.
  • 12-08-2012
    hokihigh
    Great words of wisdom...
  • 12-10-2012
    Lemmywinks
    Great advice!