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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Gnar Bar handlebars

    I was reading through the new MTBA and saw the article on the new Gnar Bars by Simple Pleasures. Has anyone tried these or seen 'em?

    If any of you have a BMX background, you'll remember the Powerlite handlebars. These have the same concept, with a bend in the middle of the grip. I was a big fan of the powerlite bars back in the day, so I'm tempted to try these out. I don't want to be the guinea pig, however.

    Their website is pretty worthless, but here's the link to it:

    http://www.spbicycles.com/tag/simple-pleasures-gnar-bar

  2. #2
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Roox had their Torque DH bars about six years ago, same damn bend. Hell I own one of those things and there are quite a few reviews of them on mtbr in the product reviews section too.





    What I find so comical about the Gnar bars is the mention in DirtRag (which reviewed one this month too) that they're patented. Nothing like yet another example of the US patent office allowing someone to write a nice descrition of claims and granting a patent on something that was not only invented already, but publically known to many DH/BMX riders already.

  3. #3
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    It looks the same, but it looks different. I may be wrong, as I'm judging from pictures, but it looks like the Roox bar has a downward bend and the Gnar Bar has an outward (or forward) bend.

    Yeah, patent law is funny. I guess the logic behind it is to encourage people to get creative and improve a design, rather than copying it.

    If you've tried the Powerlite bars, how's the feel compared to the Roox?

  4. #4
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    Gnar Bar? Who named that? Some surfers from the early 90's?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyguy1
    Gnar Bar? Who named that? Some surfers from the early 90's?
    mountain bikers have been using "gnar" and "gnarly" for years and still do, although it has sounded silly since the moment it was first spoken

  6. #6
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    About those Gnar Bars...

    Below you will find detailed information regarding the Gnar Bars by Simple Pleasures Bicycle Components.
    At this link,
    http://www.spbicycles.com/uncategori...bar-handlebars
    you will find the DirtRag review of the bars.
    I am the owner and designer of the bars, so I am very biased. I am also a full-time mechanic and rider in Bend, OR, so I'm not full of crap.
    So here's concept behind the Gnar Bars... Basically, the Control Curve feature is an arch support for the palm of your hand. If you cup, or "grip" your hand like you would on a traditional handlebar, you will notice that your palm develops a curve. This is the ergonomic benefit of the Gnar Bar.
    The performance advantages are a more balanced feel, as you have a better connection with the handlebar since the palm is fully supported. As you cover the brakes on a descent, that added connectivity, in addition to the leverage gained from the forward and downward bend at the end of the bar, you have much more control.
    Leverage, leverage, leverage... this is what DH riders are gaining by running wide bars. We can run a narrower bar with increased leverage due to the Control Curve. Singlespeeders, dirtjumpers, and anyone who likes to rally around berms will appreciate the added leverage gained from this design.
    The Roox bars are conceptually similar, but in reality a very different feel. Every try a bar with 5 degrees of sweep vs. a bar with 7 degrees? Very different ride... Every degree and feature is different from both the Powerlite and Roox bars. Those companies understood the advantages of the curve feature, but executed the design differently. I have prototyped and tested different designs for 3 yrs. in Bend, OR on demo bikes and with many different riders before putting these bars into production.
    As for naming things... ever hear of a Snuggie? or what is a "Boobar". It's a name and if you want, I'll name the next product -T22949. Kinda rolls off the tongue, eh?
    Go ride yer' bike!

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