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  1. #1
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    Flat Tire questions

    Should I buy a specific tube, one brand better than another?
    and,
    I am thinking it is never wise to patch the tube and trust it again?

    Thanks
    Last edited by rickcin; 04-28-2013 at 01:46 PM.

  2. #2
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    Two flats in two seasons??????? I've had two flats in a hour.There are different kinds of tubes ,racing,heavy duty ,filled with sealant .If you don't ever want another flat ,don't ride. Patching tubes is fine ,I 've used multi patched tubes. Carry a patch kit and a pump on your rides.

  3. #3
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    Did you check the inner surface of the tire carefully after you fixed the first flat? Maybe there's a thorn or whetever gave you the first flat still stuck in there and it gave you the second flat too. Sometimes after I remove the punctured tube I pump it up to see exactly where it's hissing from and inspect the corresponding area of the tire carefully.

    The have "slime" tubes on the market that have goop in them that will seal up small punctures, I've never used them though so I can't say how well they work.

  4. #4
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    With regards to patching tubes. I used to do it all the time and never had any problems with the patchs coming un-done. I'd patch a tube up to two times but I've since gone tubeless so I don't do that any more. My general rule of thumb was if I had a somewhat difficult time finding the leak, it was a small puncture and I'd patch it and trust the tube. If I had a very easy time finding the leak it was a large puncture and I wasn't sure if I'd want to trust it so I'd can it and put in a new tube.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricko View Post
    Did you check the inner surface of the tire carefully after you fixed the first flat? Maybe there's a thorn or whetever gave you the first flat still stuck in there and it gave you the second flat too. Sometimes after I remove the punctured tube I pump it up to see exactly where it's hissing from and inspect the corresponding area of the tire carefully.

    The have "slime" tubes on the market that have goop in them that will seal up small punctures, I've never used them though so I can't say how well they work.
    Excellent point that I should have considered! I throughly checked the entire rim however I never thought of checking the inside of the tire! What now, I just installed a new tube and pumped up the tire. Wondering if I should remove it now & take a look?

    Great comment, thanks for taking the time to respond!

  6. #6
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    1/2 of a time when I have a flat the thorn or whatever caused the puncture is still in the tire.

    Yes take it out and just run your fingers on the inside of the tire.

    I never had a problem patching small holes. Tire still worked fine.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Learux View Post
    1/2 of a time when I have a flat the thorn or whatever caused the puncture is still in the tire.

    Yes take it out and just run your fingers on the inside of the tire.

    I never had a problem patching small holes. Tire still worked fine.
    In retrospect, I could have zeroed in on the location just by matching up the tube valve along the rim, would have been a very simple task. Thanks

  8. #8
    meh... whatever
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    1. eons ago in the dark ages before tubeless i had a tube with 16 patches on it before a snake bite took it out once and for all. it got to be a running joke.

    2. go tubeless and you won't have to worry about patching a tube.
    "I never TRY anything... I just do it." ~ Varla

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod View Post
    1. eons ago in the dark ages before tubeless i had a tube with 16 patches on it before a snake bite took it out once and for all. it got to be a running joke.

    2. go tubeless and you won't have to worry about patching a tube.
    Tubeless??? Sounds interesting but it seems to be very complicated to get there! Also, unsure as to how much of a benefit it would really be for me. I ride a FS CC bike, I weigh about 215 and ride with about 35 to 40 psi, so would tubeless be a game changer for me?

  10. #10
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Tubeless??? Sounds interesting but it seems to be very complicated to get there! Also, unsure as to how much of a benefit it would really be for me. I ride a FS CC bike, I weigh about 215 and ride with about 35 to 40 psi, so would tubeless be a game changer for me?
    most wheels are easy breezy to convert. tape, strips, or both along with stems and sealant.

    the benefits are better traction and virtually no flats.

    neither your weight nor bike contraindicate going tubeless. i ran tubeless on my AM 6" travel FS bikes and did some pretty big drops, jumps, and gnarly terrain at high speed with nada prollem one.

    the only regret you'll have to going tubeless is that you didn't do it sooner...
    "I never TRY anything... I just do it." ~ Varla

  11. #11
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    When I converted to tubeless around the first of last year, I had 9 patches on the tube in the back tire. I'm sure the record is MUCH higher (c;

    Slime tubes work pretty darn good at sealing small punctures. You can also remove the valve stem and shoot some Stans Sealant into your tubes, this work pretty good as well.

    However, straight up tubeless is the bomb. Haven't had a single flat since. I DO however, carry a tube in my backpak in case I burp a tire. Pushing your bike b/c of a flat or burp is embarrassing. IMHO

    gnewcomer aka OldMtnGoat
    Last edited by gnewcomer; 04-28-2013 at 07:35 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod View Post
    1. eons ago in the dark ages before tubeless i had a tube with 16 patches on it before a snake bite took it out once and for all. it got to be a running joke.

    2. go tubeless and you won't have to worry about patching a tube.
    Have a simple question. When you ride do you carry a spare tube?

    I also would like to know why tubeless set ups get fewer flats. A puncture is a puncture...right?

    Outside of snakebites I see no difference. Can someone explain?

  13. #13
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    Flat Tire questions

    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Tubeless??? Sounds interesting but it seems to be very complicated to get there! Also, unsure as to how much of a benefit it would really be for me. I ride a FS CC bike, I weigh about 215 and ride with about 35 to 40 psi, so would tubeless be a game changer for me?
    I weigh almost 50lbs more than you. All of my bikes are tubeless. It's the only way to go.
    All the cool kids are doing it.


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  14. #14
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    As a wise man once said (either Yoda, or that Grasshopper dude from Kung Fu), go tubeless, young man!

  15. #15
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
    Have a simple question. When you ride do you carry a spare tube?

    I also would like to know why tubeless set ups get fewer flats. A puncture is a puncture...right?

    Outside of snakebites I see no difference. Can someone explain?
    yeah, i carry a 26" tube and 2 co2 cartridges in a small under seat bag in case i roll the tyre or slice the sidewall - neither of which happen very often. if i just burp the tyre i'll just shoot some co2 in it and keep going. although i ride 29ers i carry the 26" tube because it's smaller and in case i come across someone on the trial who's in need. (26" tubes work in 26", 27.5" (650b), and 29ers). giving the tube away on the trail is generally what happens to the tubes i carry.

    tubeless gets fewer flats because of the sealant that's in them. when something punctures the tyre the sealant quickly plugs the hole and you keep riding along - most of the time never knowing the puncture occurred.

    Last edited by monogod; 04-29-2013 at 01:37 AM.
    "I never TRY anything... I just do it." ~ Varla

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    ..
    I am thinking it is never wise to patch the tube and trust it again?

    Thanks
    Ha... I raced the Whiskey off-road 25 proof on rear tube with 4-5 patches in it. I did just fine. Front tube has at least 1 patch it. I have never had patch fail on the trails. I patch my tubes in bunches. (4-5 tubes a time) and let them sit for few days partially inflated to make sure. Never had patch failed, but I have missed tiny hole here and there. I have had patched tube leak, but that was always a new spot.

    However I never keep patched tube as trail spare. I don't want the folded shape to damage the patch and have it leak when I need it most. I only keep fresh tubes as trail spares. At home I can install a check it.

    Any trail side repair or home change you should run your hand inside the tire to feel for any thorns just in case.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    In retrospect, I could have zeroed in on the location just by matching up the tube valve along the rim, would have been a very simple task. Thanks
    It is still a good idea to check the inside of the tire. There might be other thorns in there that punctures the tire but not the tube!!

    Yes I have actually had that happen to me.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod View Post
    1. eons ago in the dark ages before tubeless i had a tube with 16 patches on it before a snake bite took it out once and for all. it got to be a running joke.

    ...
    Funny - we used to have contests to see who had the most - although I think 9 was about it. Eventually you could actually feel the patches as you rode on smooth pavement. The inner tube was that lopsided with patches.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  19. #19
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    I take an extra tube with me and just swap the tube in the event of a flat. Then when I get home, I patch the one that flatted. If you use a glue patch (as opposed to the "glue-less" stick-on patches) they hold fine. I've had tubes last for several years with 8-10 patches on them.

    How thin (light) a tube you can get away with will vary depending on rider and location.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  20. #20
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    A fairly easy way to help find small thorns or other pointy objects inside your tire is to lightly rub a cotton ball on the inside of the tire. The cotton ball will snag and leave a tell tale trace of where the thorn is.
    If only Sikorsky made bikes...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by TuCsaT View Post
    A fairly easy way to help find small thorns or other pointy objects inside your tire is to lightly rub a cotton ball on the inside of the tire. The cotton ball will snag and leave a tell tale trace of where the thorn is.
    You guys are just soo smart that it kills what little self esteem I managed to have!!


    But thanks....)

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