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  1. #1
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    favorite patches?

    i tried the park glueless patches, and they just don't hold air as well. they worked enough for the rest of the day, but the next day, flat tires again. i'm used to having tubes with numerous patches on them using the old school glue ones. i switched back, bought 50 of them from china for 2 bucks lol.. anyone else have that experience? i'd go tubeless, but i feel like thats too much effort because i switch tires between road and dirt sometimes every other day and don't want to buy new rims because i feel like its too much work to swap the discs and cassettes too.

  2. #2
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    You got to have a glue one with the sandpaper to adhere better. Also when at home patching stuff I used heat for it to adhere even better. I use the slime patch kits when I do have one.
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  3. #3
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    i do have a heat gun, thats a good idea. i'll have to try that next time

  4. #4
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    I use the $2 kits from the supermarket. They work well. Just make sure the glue is dry before you put the patch on. I've never needed to heat them.

    After opening the glue it lasts longer if you keep it in the fridge.

    Tim

  5. #5
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    I use old, cut-up tubes. A jar of Elmer's rubber cement and an old tube will give you dozens and dozens of patches of any size you need. I've been patching tubes this way for over 20 years. You don't need a heat gun.

    1. Cut a patch out of an old tube. Clean it with solvent or soap and water to get all the powder off. Let dry. Clean the tube where you're going to patch with solvent or alcohol. Let dry. Circle the puncture with a sharpie so you know what you're working with.

    2. Apply a thin coat of rubber cement (can be Elmer's rubber cement) on BOTH sides of where you want to patch, on the tube and on the patch itself.

    3. LET THE CEMENT DRY TO A MATTE TEXTURE! If you don't allow both sides to dry, you won't get a strong hold. This usually takes about 2-3 minutes, or longer depending on the weather.

    4. Carefully apply the patch. Once you apply, you can't reposition it, so be accurate. This is why you circle the puncture with a sharpie.

    5. Take a socket and press/roll it over the patch to get rid of air bubbles, like you're rolling out a pizza crust with a rolling pin.

    6. Let dry for 10-15 minutes before reinstalling. I hit the patched area with a little baby powder just so it doesn't stick to the inside of the tire.

    I usually install a brand new tube, and used the patched tube as a backup. Some of my bikes are tubeless, some are not (like my CX bike).
    Last edited by Dion; 07-26-2012 at 10:47 PM.

  6. #6
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    Wow this thread brings me back to a simpiler time. I still run tubes but haven't hassled with patches for years. I just buy new tubes but then again I don't flat very often either.

  7. #7
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    I use any soft round patches. Actually, it is better to try and avoid patching at all.
    I have sealant in my tubes and kind of glue the tube to the tyre by spreading the sealant inside the tyre. Normally it solves the problem for punctures caused by all kinds of plant needles. For larger punctures (mostly from broken glass on asphalt) I just put a zip-tie on the place of cut. The zip-tie itself won't hold air, but it helps the sealant create lumps and eventually clog the hole in both tyre and tube. It works as long as the air pressure is high enough (I run 40 + PSI).

  8. #8
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    just use a new tube. why are you getting so many flats?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfruits View Post
    just use a new tube. why are you getting so many flats?
    Just use a tube???? Huh? He is asking what patches work best to "patch a tube". But I do agree with your question "why are you getting so many flats?"

  10. #10
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    Feather edge patches are much better. Agree with some chalk on it afterwards. My front tyre has a least 6 of these patches on it right now. Damn thorns, roll on tubeless.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinDirt View Post
    Just use a tube???? Huh? He is asking what patches work best to "patch a tube". But I do agree with your question "why are you getting so many flats?"
    im just saying to use a new tube instead of patching. i only got 1 or 2 flats a yr when i ran tubes. wasnt worth the hassle of patching IMO. trail side patching? no way!

  12. #12
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    You need a vulcanizing glue type patch kit for a permanent repair. The Park patches are just for trail side repairs.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    Favorite patches.
    Not my favorite, but pretty cool nonetheless. Hope this helps

    Ahhhh...Ahhhh....it's the hammy, it's the hammy!!

  14. #14
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    some of the places i go have thorn bushes... and when they dry out, and they're on the trail, you get flats... i've gotten a few flats so far this season, and between me and my friends going together, we've probably got 10 or 12 between us.. i'm constantly fixing flats it seems. i normally don't carry a tube with me, i just leave them in the car. i'm talking for trail repairs mainly. i tried the glueless, but they don't even hold the air for the rest of the day. i have a few patches in my tires now that have been there for a while and they're fine. i usually don't change the tub until i find cracks in the valve stem.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    some of the places i go have thorn bushes... and when they dry out, and they're on the trail, you get flats... i've gotten a few flats so far this season, and between me and my friends going together, we've probably got 10 or 12 between us.. i'm constantly fixing flats it seems. i normally don't carry a tube with me, i just leave them in the car. i'm talking for trail repairs mainly. i tried the glueless, but they don't even hold the air for the rest of the day. i have a few patches in my tires now that have been there for a while and they're fine. i usually don't change the tub until i find cracks in the valve stem.
    If you're not going tubeless, convert/drill out your rims to Schrader, remove the valve core, fill the tube with 2-3 oz. of Stans sealant, and put the valve core back. Now you have self-sealing tubes.

    I never get flats because I do these types of things. Why ruin a ride when you have pragmatic, simple solutions to a basic mechanical?

  16. #16
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    Worlds best patches And glue - Rema Tip Top REMA TIP TOP North America Inc. - Products
    No points to garage queens!

    "Mum it's not a bike - it's a Yeti" (my daughter explaining things)

  17. #17
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    The REMA ones have always worked fine for me in a pinch (I'm not a big fan of patching, though). Cheap, too.

    I tried Slime Scabs, and they didn't work at all.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

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