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Thread: fatigue problem

  1. #1
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    fatigue problem

    I have a fatigue problem because I take antidepressant, Citalopam. I can't maintain energy for long ride. I have to pause frequently to catch recharge my battery.

    How do you guys manage fatigue issue? I need energy to do outdoor sports such as biking, hiking, snowshoeing.

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    That level of fatigue isnt much the medicine. Im on a similar type. I dont notice any fatigue worse than when I wasnt on it.

    If its a new prescription for you, its likely a side effect while your body adjusts. Based on this just being asked by you, I would gather this is the case. In which case just keep riding, it will get better.

    If its a prescription you have been on for a long time, best to talk with your doctor. Every persons body reacts differently to different meds. Have to talk with your doctor.

    One thing that is a must, keep exercising.

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    Many medications have a period of adjustment that can last for weeks, SSRI's are no exception. If this is your first SSRI then it may not be the one for you, you may have to try a few to find the one that works best with acceptable side effects.

    Modify the intensity of your exercise until you feel more energetic, but as was mentioned don't stop moving, exercise is good for the brain.
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  4. #4
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    my psychiatrist already changed my medication 4 times. This prescription seems to be the best in combating my depression. All of these SSRI seem to have fatigue as side effects. I have to take strong dose of caffeine to stay awake and get me energize for outdoor activities.

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    How long are your rides? How often?

    All I know is, the more I ride the better I feel. I don't take your kind of meds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    I have a fatigue problem because I take antidepressant, Citalopam. I can't maintain energy for long ride. I have to pause frequently to catch recharge my battery.

    How do you guys manage fatigue issue? I need energy to do outdoor sports such as biking, hiking, snowshoeing.
    Shuttles ^^

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    Thats part of the issue, continuous caffeine. Need to look at your diet as well. Entirely possible with the meds and caffeine you are depleting nutrients too quickly and its something or combination of that you are not getting a high enough intake of.

    My issue is seasonal. Imbalance created by lack of sunlight. So i get the joys of it sometimes during the fall. Been working on finding more natural remedies and using shear will power to overcome as much of it as possible.

    Try researching foods that are proven to help, try varying your diet more as well. Look at your diet for vitamin B intake as well. Remember active lifestyle increases requirements May not help depression but once you find what your body is lacking you will know. Literally feel 10x better (physically) within an hour or so. Make you realize the foods you need to add into your diet rotation. That helps TREMENDOUSLY for the physical side of the fatigue.

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    You may want to research SNRI's, they work on slowing the re-uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine (which is a stress hormone that triggers the release of glucose).
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  9. #9
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    Definitely look at diet as a potential factor.
    Personally, too much sugar and simple carbs make me fatigue faster than when I am fueled with fats and proteins.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    Definitely look at diet as a potential factor.
    Personally, too much sugar and simple carbs make me fatigue faster than when I am fueled with fats and proteins.
    This is actually very similar for me as well. But I find that there is a very delicate balance which I havent been able to replicate on a regular basis yet. Still sorting it out. But carbs kept to vegetables with a little fruit, whatever small amounts exist in meat, seeds, nuts.



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  11. #11
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    Nothing that a bit of good ol' recharge therapy couldn't fix!

    fatigue problem-battery_tender_power_tender_plus_he_750x750.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    I have a fatigue problem because I take antidepressant, Citalopam.
    stop right there. this is a medial question that should be answered by a medical professional, not a bunch of strangers on the internet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Nothing that a bit of good ol' recharge therapy couldn't fix!
    me likey.

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    How can you be cycling and depressed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    How can you be cycling and depressed?
    This is America, where 90% of the population is medicated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    Definitely look at diet as a potential factor.
    Personally, too much sugar and simple carbs make me fatigue faster than when I am fueled with fats and proteins.
    I rarely eat sugar on daily basis. I will try to eat more fats and protein. I often eat rice during dinner.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    stop right there. this is a medial question that should be answered by a medical professional, not a bunch of strangers on the internet.
    I am aware of it. I am wondering if anyone else taking medication like me

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    Quote Originally Posted by LargeMan View Post
    This is America, where 90% of the population is medicated.
    Not sure where you got that info, but sites I'm looking at claim 70%.

    https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...n-drugs-062113

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/study-s...ription-drugs/

    https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/d...l-center-find/
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    stop right there. this is a medial question that should be answered by a medical professional, not a bunch of strangers on the internet.
    If we all did that then it would be 100% medicated instead of the much more scientific 70%.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  20. #20
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    Not to play Dr. Sh!tFerBrainz, but perhaps the fatigue is a symptom of the depression. Been there, done that. Ask your shrink. He probably won't know either, but at least he has the credentials.

    And keep riding regardless. Exercise is a great drug for depression, not to mention everything else.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Nothing that a bit of good ol' recharge therapy couldn't fix!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Might be a good idea to include instructions. IIRC, the red clip goes on the right testicle and the black on the left.
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    You do realize that 70% number is from a single study from almost a decade ago from a single county in Minnesota......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    I rarely eat sugar on daily basis. I will try to eat more fats and protein. I often eat rice during dinner.

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    This is a very good idea. I eat almost two lbs a day of red meat and I'm doing great, the doctors are amazed. Cholesterol under 240, blood pressure normal. Now if you have a family history of heart disease, this diet isn't for everyone, but I have about twice the energy I did after I cut out wheat and other gluten-based products.

    As far as your antidepressant is concerned, do you get sleepy after a glass of alcohol? You can ask your doctor to change it over to an SNRI like Effexor. The main issue is your blood pressure, it has to be normal and if it goes up after taking that drug then you can't take it anymore. Those drugs don't just raise serotonin levels in the synaptic cleft, they also raise norepinephrine (a precursor to adrenaline) so you should get an energy boost. Talk it over with your doctor. It should be OK to combine low levels of both drugs during the transition but they would know better. You can also try taking the bare minimum of a Celexa dose that still works. Remember this is your body, your brain, your choice on what to do with the drug levels, it's 'only' neurosis, it's not like lithum or antipsychotics where you have to follow directions without question. SSRI's have flexible levels of intake for each person. Celexa's range is 20-40 mg/day but there are some people that take 10 mg/day because of side effects. Don't worry Picard, if you experiment with different diets and optimize the antidepressant and its daily level you'll probably be fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    If we all did that then it would be 100% medicated instead of the much more scientific 70%.
    In Picard's case, he is already medicated and has a question related to his medication. Sounds like he needs a professional opinion, maybe that of a different medical professional, but a professional opinion nonetheless.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Might be a good idea to include instructions. IIRC, the red clip goes on the right testicle and the black on the left.
    thanks for the instruction man.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    In Picard's case, he is already medicated and has a question related to his medication. Sounds like he needs a professional opinion, maybe that of a different medical professional, but a professional opinion nonetheless.
    I agree with you 100%. This post is not directed at you.
    Was more taking a jab at the industry as whole. A lot of people may be surprised to understand that "diseases" in the DSM are literally voted on to classify them as a disease. Voted on by a board that has direct ties to big pharma. There is no test to designate that someone has a mental disorder and there is little science involved imo. Doctors are incentivised to prescribe medication and therefore seeking a doctors advice may infact not be in your best interest. The amount of new diseases "discovered" and included in the DSM, new medications, and money spent on medications has soared since advertising drugs directly to the publuc in 1993. That's a pretty interesting coincidence.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    This is a very good idea. I eat almost two lbs a day of red meat and I'm doing great, the doctors are amazed. Cholesterol under 240, blood pressure normal. Now if you have a family history of heart disease, this diet isn't for everyone, but I have about twice the energy I did after I cut out wheat and other gluten-based products.

    As far as your antidepressant is concerned, do you get sleepy after a glass of alcohol? You can ask your doctor to change it over to an SNRI like Effexor. The main issue is your blood pressure, it has to be normal and if it goes up after taking that drug then you can't take it anymore. Those drugs don't just raise serotonin levels in the synaptic cleft, they also raise norepinephrine (a precursor to adrenaline) so you should get an energy boost. Talk it over with your doctor. It should be OK to combine low levels of both drugs during the transition but they would know better. You can also try taking the bare minimum of a Celexa dose that still works. Remember this is your body, your brain, your choice on what to do with the drug levels, it's 'only' neurosis, it's not like lithum or antipsychotics where you have to follow directions without question. SSRI's have flexible levels of intake for each person. Celexa's range is 20-40 mg/day but there are some people that take 10 mg/day because of side effects. Don't worry Picard, if you experiment with different diets and optimize the antidepressant and its daily level you'll probably be fine.
    I take Citalopram as anti-depressant and Quetiapine as ani-anxiety medications.
    Quetiapine cause alot of drowsiness therefore I only take it at night before bed time.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Not to play Dr. Sh!tFerBrainz, but perhaps the fatigue is a symptom of the depression. Been there, done that. Ask your shrink. He probably won't know either, but at least he has the credentials.

    And keep riding regardless. Exercise is a great drug for depression, not to mention everything else.
    I need to take caffeine pills to wake me up since anti-anxiet medication cause a great deal of drowsiness. I take caffeine 1 hr before any bike ride.

  29. #29
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    Sorry to hear that you are challenged by this but also happy that you are dealing with your depression in positive ways. What really gets me is how people with depression are treated in this country (don't know about the rest of the world?). About nine years ago I was dealing with severe depression and have had it for most of my life, still do. I decided that I needed help and went to therapy and got on medication. I tried a number of meds and did have a hard time finding on that dealt with the symptoms with minimal side effects.

    Fast forward a few years when I was getting set up with life insurance. Well I was rated as a schedule D because of the depression. Had I not gone to the doctor to try to help myself I would have been rated much, much higher. What the F is that all about!!!

    I stayed off meds for 7 years and when I moved to a new life insurance program I ended up being rated premier or whatever is the highest rating. Great job insurance companies for promoting not helping yourself to not get punished for it.

    Currently I am in a big slump. Bikes are getting dusty (well not really I do get out at least once a week but it is a struggle), don't sleep well and self medication is not helping no surprise. I fear looking to meds as my past experience left a terrible taste and concerns about how the medical and insurance industry will look at me. F*ck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Not to play Dr. Sh!tFerBrainz, but perhaps the fatigue is a symptom of the depression. Been there, done that. Ask your shrink. He probably won't know either, but at least he has the credentials.

    And keep riding regardless. Exercise is a great drug for depression, not to mention everything else.
    I second this. I have wicked anxiety that I try to manage with a lot of base miles... it doesn't always work, so I tend to spend a lot of days at work with my body extremely tensed up for 8-10 solid hours (not counting cool down time when I get home). Caffeine makes this way worse, so I have to limit my coffee. The point is, if your body is balled up all day from depression/anxiety, it takes a toll on your riding when you come down. My muscles are sore more often than not and feel like they fatigue faster than if I have a good week with very little stress.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FullBladdy View Post
    ......Currently I am in a big slump. Bikes are getting dusty (well not really I do get out at least once a week but it is a struggle), don't sleep well and self medication is not helping no surprise. I fear looking to meds as my past experience left a terrible taste and concerns about how the medical and insurance industry will look at me. F*ck!
    I spent years trying to keep my mental health issues from being recorded by anyone...I tried every type of self-medicating known to man. It wasn't until my wife said she was leaving that I decided having a record of psych meds was better than sleeping alone.

    Since that time I have come to accept that without my SSNRI's, the likelihood of me sliding back into that bottomless black hole of depression is a chance I am not willing to take. I may pay a higher insurance premium or I may not, I've never checked. F#@k them anyways!

    Everyday I can get out of bed and be glad I did reinforces the fact that I don't give a flying fig what any corporation or person thinks of me and my condition.
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    dont put shit in your car, it will run shitty

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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    dont put shit in your car, it will run shitty
    If I put gas in my car will it make it gassy?

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I agree with you 100%. This post is not directed at you.
    Was more taking a jab at the industry as whole. A lot of people may be surprised to understand that "diseases" in the DSM are literally voted on to classify them as a disease. Voted on by a board that has direct ties to big pharma. There is no test to designate that someone has a mental disorder and there is little science involved imo. Doctors are incentivised to prescribe medication and therefore seeking a doctors advice may infact not be in your best interest. The amount of new diseases "discovered" and included in the DSM, new medications, and money spent on medications has soared since advertising drugs directly to the publuc in 1993. That's a pretty interesting coincidence.
    The DSM 5 is far from perfect, but it certainly provides a basis for psychiatric support and care.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    I need to take caffeine pills to wake me up since anti-anxiet medication cause a great deal of drowsiness. I take caffeine 1 hr before any bike ride.
    Medication alone won't adequately address depression and anxiety. Therapy is key. The meds lift the fog, so to speak, and allow for good therapy.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I agree with you 100%. This post is not directed at you.
    Was more taking a jab at the industry as whole. A lot of people may be surprised to understand that "diseases" in the DSM are literally voted on to classify them as a disease. Voted on by a board that has direct ties to big pharma. There is no test to designate that someone has a mental disorder and there is little science involved imo. Doctors are incentivised to prescribe medication and therefore seeking a doctors advice may infact not be in your best interest. The amount of new diseases "discovered" and included in the DSM, new medications, and money spent on medications has soared since advertising drugs directly to the publuc in 1993. That's a pretty interesting coincidence.

    In what way are doctors incentivized to prescribe medicine? Is this specific to psychiatry?

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydoc View Post
    In what way are doctors incentivized to prescribe medicine?
    In the UK, doctors get cash from drug companies in a variety of ways. They can get paid 'consultancy fees' for assessing a drugs suitability for use but they don't legally need to disclose anything drug companies pay them so the scale of the situation is not known. What is known is that some doctors are earning anything from £10'000 to £100'000 a year from 'pushing' certain drugs. Which is quite shocking don't you think?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydoc View Post
    In what way are doctors incentivized to prescribe medicine? Is this specific to psychiatry?
    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...me-prescribing

    https://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist....rug-kickbacks/
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    The DSM 5 is far from perfect, but it certainly provides a basis for psychiatric support and care.
    It also provides a basis for rampant corruption.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  40. #40
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    I just came across this today and I feel it does have some footing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/...st-connections

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    Quote Originally Posted by FullBladdy View Post
    I just came across this today and I feel it does have some footing.
    Absolutely. It's common sense. People are far too quick to trust the medical profession.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    This is a very good idea. I eat almost two lbs a day of red meat and I'm doing great, the doctors are amazed. Cholesterol under 240, blood pressure normal. Now if you have a family history of heart disease, this diet isn't for everyone, but I have about twice the energy I did after I cut out wheat and other gluten-based products.

    As far as your antidepressant is concerned, do you get sleepy after a glass of alcohol? You can ask your doctor to change it over to an SNRI like Effexor. The main issue is your blood pressure, it has to be normal and if it goes up after taking that drug then you can't take it anymore. Those drugs don't just raise serotonin levels in the synaptic cleft, they also raise norepinephrine (a precursor to adrenaline) so you should get an energy boost. Talk it over with your doctor. It should be OK to combine low levels of both drugs during the transition but they would know better. You can also try taking the bare minimum of a Celexa dose that still works. Remember this is your body, your brain, your choice on what to do with the drug levels, it's 'only' neurosis, it's not like lithum or antipsychotics where you have to follow directions without question. SSRI's have flexible levels of intake for each person. Celexa's range is 20-40 mg/day but there are some people that take 10 mg/day because of side effects. Don't worry Picard, if you experiment with different diets and optimize the antidepressant and its daily level you'll probably be fine.
    If I drink booze, I will sleep for whole week. I can't tolerate alcohol

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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by FullBladdy View Post
    I just came across this today and I feel it does have some footing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/...st-connections
    That's a worthwhile read and highlights some of the ways big pharma manipulates studies and study data. I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest the reason why 1 in 6 American adults has used antidepressants in the last year is not because of an epidemic of depression.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    That's a worthwhile read and highlights some of the ways big pharma manipulates studies and study data. I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest the reason why 1 in 6 American adults has used antidepressants in the last year is not because of an epidemic of depression.
    I wouldn't be so quick to disregard those numbers. It's very possible that we are suffering a depression epidemic. People are more stimulated than they ever have been before, our economy and job market in the US is still fairly stale (though better), people are racked with student loan debt, and interaction with your community outside of Liking your neighbors Facebook posts are at an all time low. Couple that with the fact that most people don't take care of themselves and are constantly jacked on sugar and caffeine, and you have a horrible recipe for anxiety and depression.

  45. #45
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    I took a 20min nap today at lunch time. I felt just exhausted. it is due to anti-depressant however, I felt much better after the nap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DualRollers View Post
    I wouldn't be so quick to disregard those numbers. It's very possible that we are suffering a depression epidemic. People are more stimulated than they ever have been before, our economy and job market in the US is still fairly stale (though better), people are racked with student loan debt, and interaction with your community outside of Liking your neighbors Facebook posts are at an all time low. Couple that with the fact that most people don't take care of themselves and are constantly jacked on sugar and caffeine, and you have a horrible recipe for anxiety and depression.
    That's a fair and very poignant poin. However, all that is a matter of lifestyle, not an underlying issue of brain chemical imbalance. Hopefully we don't except a society so sick that we must be medicated to cope.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  47. #47
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    Picard,

    I take several medication for depression / anxiety / ADHD. Wellbutrin for depression, Adderall for ADHD, and Trazodone for anxiety/sleep issues. It took a while to figure out how and when it was best to take these meds, depending on level of activity for the day (but, as others have stated, everyone's different):

    Wellbutrin: Take first thing every morning, no exceptions. Doesn't seem to affect energy levels, as I've been on it for years.

    Adderall: This one's tricky. Can't take on days I know I'll be riding really hard, as it jacks my heart rate up too much. Caffeine adds to this issue, but I have to limit my intake of caffeine anyway because of the Adderall.

    Trazodone: I take this to sleep, but not consistently. Only when I start being unable to sleep through the night or have a hard time falling asleep. This is the one drug that I have the same side effects you seem to be experiencing. Day after taking it I'm very lethargic, no energy (even with Adderall!!!!)

    Bottom line, you need to consult your doc about med issues, but for me it helps to talk about it with other people to see how these types of meds affect them and how they deal with it.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbadger1977 View Post
    Picard,

    I take several medication for depression / anxiety / ADHD. Wellbutrin for depression, Adderall for ADHD, and Trazodone for anxiety/sleep issues. It took a while to figure out how and when it was best to take these meds, depending on level of activity for the day (but, as others have stated, everyone's different):

    Wellbutrin: Take first thing every morning, no exceptions. Doesn't seem to affect energy levels, as I've been on it for years.

    Adderall: This one's tricky. Can't take on days I know I'll be riding really hard, as it jacks my heart rate up too much. Caffeine adds to this issue, but I have to limit my intake of caffeine anyway because of the Adderall.

    Trazodone: I take this to sleep, but not consistently. Only when I start being unable to sleep through the night or have a hard time falling asleep. This is the one drug that I have the same side effects you seem to be experiencing. Day after taking it I'm very lethargic, no energy (even with Adderall!!!!)

    Bottom line, you need to consult your doc about med issues, but for me it helps to talk about it with other people to see how these types of meds affect them and how they deal with it.
    I discussed this issue with my doctor but she just switch me to new med. it seems like a revolving door. this med seems to be best for me at this time.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    It also provides a basis for rampant corruption.
    That's not all on the creators of the DSM 5; that's on the individual prescribing doctors.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    That's a worthwhile read and highlights some of the ways big pharma manipulates studies and study data. I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest the reason why 1 in 6 American adults has used antidepressants in the last year is not because of an epidemic of depression.
    Diagnostics and awareness have improved. Similar in some ways to autism.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    I discussed this issue with my doctor but she just switch me to new med. it seems like a revolving door. this med seems to be best for me at this time.
    Like I said before, talk therapy is just as important when it comes to treatment. People are often under the misunderstanding that the meds will alleviate everything.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Like I said before, talk therapy is just as important when it comes to treatment. People are often under the misunderstanding that the meds will alleviate everything.
    Talk therapy cost big bucks. I had a few sessions but I ran out of free credits. I can't pay any more

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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    This is a very good idea. I eat almost two lbs a day of red meat and I'm doing great...
    Ummm what, 2 lbs of red meat a day? Thatís like a double batch of taco meat, thatís like 8 sloppy joeís or 8 hamburgers...by yourself, every day? I agree with the high fat diet but Iím jealous I canít eat that much and still walk.

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    I think itís easier to increase leg muscles than lung capacity. It takes longer, but it will get better.

  55. #55
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    Typically unexpected fatigue is triggered by exceeding your anaerobic threshold, not from depleting your glycogen storage. In order to expand your anaerobic threshold, do interval / fartlek training. Find a relatively flat, XC, or slight uphill course. Minimize the DH sections during the intensity training part of the ride. You should be able to / rely on pedaling during your interval.

    Choose a landmark / feature in the distance, go ALL OUT till then (I mean like legs on fire / lungs on fire), once you pass it, slow down, not stop, but to a "reasonable" pace that will allow you to recover. A good measure of "recovery" is can you "sing" a song out loud without gasping as you go at that pace? Once you have recovered, usually should be within 5 minutes or less, if not within 5 mins slow down further, pick another landmark / feature, and go all out again, rinse repeat. Each interval of intensity should last no longer than 5 mins or so.

    The focus of these should be quality not quantity. If you have trouble riding 5 miles right now, use this technique for 2 miles. If you can't ride 10, use it for 5 miles, can't ride 20, use it for 10, etc.

    Not only will it allow you to start to adapt a higher overall speed, but it will slowly increase your maximum overall effort for burst. Each of those are important in MTB, but more importantly for you, should start to help you be able to sustain effort over longer periods of time by eliminating the chance of unexpectedly exceeding your anaerobic threshold.

  56. #56
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    How these days is feeling Picard?
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    How these days is feeling Picard?
    I am taking testosterone gel to boost my energy.

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    I never took mental health seriously until it happened to me. I took Effexor XR for about a half year, and though it helped it had many side effects. Being very tired and drowsy was the hardest one to deal with. For me there were times when it hit me and I was practically floored, but after a few hours I would relatively normal and able to function. I had to find that window of time that I wasn't super tired to do vigorous activities. It took me about 2 months before I adjusted to the meds and was able to work through the drowsiness. I hope you're able to find a way to get out there. Riding definitely help me get off the meds. Cheers.

  59. #59
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    I had this problem after getting a vaccine course. (first time as an adult, for an EMT class). Couldn't put down power, but everyday life felt fine. Went on for months. Finally I did a 4 day fast and that cleared it up. Got the idea from another EMT who had the same problem. Bizarre.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by scaryfast View Post
    I never took mental health seriously until it happened to me. I took Effexor XR for about a half year, and though it helped it had many side effects. Being very tired and drowsy was the hardest one to deal with. For me there were times when it hit me and I was practically floored, but after a few hours I would relatively normal and able to function. I had to find that window of time that I wasn't super tired to do vigorous activities. It took me about 2 months before I adjusted to the meds and was able to work through the drowsiness. I hope you're able to find a way to get out there. Riding definitely help me get off the meds. Cheers.
    My doctor did not prescribe me Effexor

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    Getting off the meds is the thing that will stop the side effects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    Getting off the meds is the thing that will stop the side effects.
    That would be great but how then do you treat the problem? Some conditions absolutely require medications...many meds give the user the ability to do the other kinds of work required for a comprehensive treatment program to be effective.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    Getting off the meds is the thing that will stop the side effects.
    If I get off meds then I will crash badly. I will have suicidal thoughts.

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    I know, I was just saying that these ssri's (anti depressants) may have some similar side effects. If that's the case maybe you can time the release is all. Hopefully the drowsiness is a transient effect and will go away over time. My phsychiatrist also told me to take 3 pills daily but that was way too strong for me, I ended up decreasing my dosage and was getting the benefit of the drug while also not getting the flooring effect but clearly not a doctor so I digress.

  65. #65
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    Going to PM you Picard...
    It's all Here. Now.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    Going to PM you Picard...
    Ok

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    It is not possible for people who haven't experienced true clinical depression to understand the darkness that can creep into an otherwise happy mind. It's all about chemical imbalances in the brain that cannot be adjusted sufficiently without medication.

    Finding the right anti-depressant for you can be a long term trial and error process. It took me a couple of years and a half dozen meds before I settled on duloxetine.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  68. #68
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    I take Fvckitol and couldn't be happier!
    Quote Originally Posted by sito40 View Post
    You guys should chill out. Take some weeds!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I take Fvckitol and couldn't be happier!
    Capsule, combustible or liquid over ice?
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Capsule, combustible or liquid over ice?
    Suppository!

    Depression and other issues are no joke, but I do recommend as much humor as you can handle, it's the best medicine!
    Quote Originally Posted by sito40 View Post
    You guys should chill out. Take some weeds!

  71. #71
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    my mother also has severe depression. Her mood fluctuate regularly and she mumbles incoherent stuff.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    It is not possible for people who haven't experienced true clinical depression to understand the darkness that can creep into an otherwise happy mind. It's all about chemical imbalances in the brain that cannot be adjusted sufficiently without medication.

    Finding the right anti-depressant for you can be a long term trial and error process. It took me a couple of years and a half dozen meds before I settled on duloxetine.
    I settled on Duloxetine as well but recently ran into a major problem. My heart was racing on rides and I couldn't get it to slow down. It was making me feel very out of shape and weak. Stopped taking my pills and after 3 days I was able to ride normally again. On with the search for a new med.

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  73. #73
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    Oh so that explains it^^^^^^^^

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    Oh so that explains it^^^^^^^^
    Explains what

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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Explains what

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    I read that you were having an issue with your heart and I was curious. So it was the meds right?

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    It is not possible for people who haven't experienced true clinical depression to understand the darkness that can creep into an otherwise happy mind. It's all about chemical imbalances in the brain that cannot be adjusted sufficiently without medication.

    Finding the right anti-depressant for you can be a long term trial and error process. It took me a couple of years and a half dozen meds before I settled on duloxetine.
    If it works for you then I am not arguing that, but I had very serious depression for decades. I was on various anti depressants for years. I got to a point where I decided I didn't want to depend on meds, I wanted to figure out how to get along on my own. So I stopped, and adjusted my attitudes, and have been off them, and free from serious depression for many years now. It is possible, and you don't have to just give up and depend on meds if you don't want to.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    If it works for you then I am not arguing that,
    Pretty well accepted that a combination of medication and talk therapy is the most effective. Unfortunately there may be barriers to obtaining that treatment, financial, logistical, fear, motivation etc etc. Diet and exercise are important components too.

    The only thing that matters to me is that everybody is able to find the solution that works for them... life is too short to lose time to treatable conditions, YTMV (your treatment may vary).
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  78. #78
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    I take my meds in the evening so that I have energy throughout the day. I do sleep more with the meds, but have gotten used to it more or less. Not nearly so lethargic these days.

    Coffee before every ride usually gets me through. Most rides are under two hours- three hours max.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    If it works for you then I am not arguing that, but I had very serious depression for decades. I was on various anti depressants for years. I got to a point where I decided I didn't want to depend on meds, I wanted to figure out how to get along on my own. So I stopped, and adjusted my attitudes, and have been off them, and free from serious depression for many years now. It is possible, and you don't have to just give up and depend on meds if you don't want to.
    I am careful to tell people this, but I feel the same way. I have had some serious lows, to the point that my wife was ready to throw me in the car and take me to the doctor to get a script for anti-depressants... somehow I have always been able to pull myself out of it though. Eat healthy and wear myself out with a lot of riding miles generally does the trick, even when I have been to the point of giving up on everything.


    One thing I did was focus very heavily on what goes into my body. Find patterns, realize that maybe putting one certain thing in my body is guaranteed to cause a dip in mental stability. As I mentioned above, coffee is a big one. I have been through enough lows that I know as soon as I start feeling that "I am getting depressed and I don't know why" feeling, coffee is 100% gone until it's ran its course. Carb heavy foods are the same way, which is also hard. I crave peanut butter sandwiches like a madman when I am in a low, so I have to be very careful of that.


    There are a million instances like this that I have just figured out by trial and error... so while I would never tell someone that they could get off antidepressants if they wanted too, its upsetting to see so many people relying on them when they could clearly make big sweeping changes to their diet and lifestyle that would likely remove the need for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DualRollers View Post
    ... so while I would never tell someone that they could get off antidepressants if they wanted too, its upsetting to see so many people relying on them when they could clearly make big sweeping changes to their diet and lifestyle that would likely remove the need for them.
    Unfortunately it's not that simple, changing the way you think is helpful but want and willpower have very little influence on brain chemistry. For some, staying on medications is their only chance at being functional.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

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    When I'm fatigued I usually OD on coffee.

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