Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 50
  1. #1
    Master Shredder
    Reputation: mk.ultra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    298

    Does a heavier bike = a stronger rider? (NO FLAME WAR PLEASE)

    I have a crappy entry level GT Avalanche 3.0 which I absolutely love. Every time I ride it I'm pushing myself to go faster and faster. But this thing is pretty heavy compared to most bikes, which got me to wondering...if I just keep pushing myself on this thing, will I keep getting stronger until weight doesn't really matter?

    I thought this through a little bit. Sure if you have an ultralight bike, you can keep pushing yourself to make the ride harder and more strenous. But for the average rider on my average trails (Tight and twisty singletrack), you can really only go so fast, which limits how much you can actually push your strength/endurance limits. It would be a different story on a straightforward uphill climb.

    Thoughts?
    "Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads." -Back to the Future

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Anonymous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,817
    Do you smile when you ride?
    That's all that matters.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  3. #3
    Master Shredder
    Reputation: mk.ultra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    298
    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
    Do you smile when you ride?
    That's all that matters.
    Usually, unless I'm getting stung by hornets like today LOL. but after that I got back to enjoying the ride. my bike might not be "dialed" in to me, but I'm dialed into my bike.
    "Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads." -Back to the Future

  4. #4
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,998
    A heavier bike means you get the same amount of work done in a shorter period of time. That just means you drink beer before everyone else.

  5. #5
    ~Reformed Mechanic~
    Reputation: Ace5high's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,178
    I think in a way it does... When I train with heavy wheels/tires I feel a difference in leg strength when switching back to normal light wheel/tire combo and Im not just talking about feeling the rotational weight difference..

    Its kinda like dropping an extra 45 plate on each side of the squat rack
    I do all my own stunts, but never intentionally...

  6. #6
    Master Shredder
    Reputation: mk.ultra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    298
    I think since my local trails are relatively easy I might start strapping dumbbells to my bike to make it more difficult. lol jk

    But I feel like when I abuse the Avalanche to the max and finally get a pretty light bike it'll be like floating on clouds.
    "Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads." -Back to the Future

  7. #7
    Trail Connoisseur
    Reputation: RIVER29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    624
    I thought about this a lot back in the day. I'm a really light person (125lbs) and I use to ride a 22.5lbs SWorks because I thought it was all proportional and what not. Now, I'm still the lightest rider of my friends and I have the heaviest bike (34lbs-ish). I don't race and neither does anyone I ride with. We have a ton of fun and I've never felt like the weight of my bike stopped me from smoking my 200lbs friends up a technical climb.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    244
    thats how it is with all exercise. The more you push yourself, the more endurance and strength you will build.....as long as your replenishing yourself with enough calories and vitamins.

    I myself have a pretty basic entry bike (2008 Trek 820). It is being converted to a single speed this weekend. Expecting this thing to own me considering the weight of this thing.

  9. #9
    Bro Mountainbiker
    Reputation: Sheepo5669's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    3,501
    No, a heavier bike means you go slower. Its still fun though.
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  10. #10
    Rookie
    Reputation: MonsterD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    259
    Well I don't notice much of a difference in the weight of the bike...
    Throw some nobby tires on with low pressures, I think that will help with exercise... A lot.
    Ruder than you.
    Ska is not dead!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 2wheelsnotfour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,695
    I've seen guys riding cross country trails on down hill rigs clearly in an effort to train hard for down hill riding.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pop_martian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    No, a heavier bike means you go slower. Its still fun though.
    This.

    This topic comes up on a semi frequent basis in the XC racing forum. Studies show that the only effect a heavier bike has is to slow you down when compared to a lighter bike.
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,772
    I ride a heavy bike when I'm alone or with slower riders and a 27 pound bike if I'm the slow guy.
    Keep loving your boat anchor. You definitely have to be stronger to push more weight the same distance as a light weight.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    231
    Riding a bike makes you a stronger rider. Just ride, smile, repeat. Don't forget the beer part.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,248
    If you' manage to hang on the wheel of an equally fit rider on a much lighter bike then yes, I think riding a tank would make you stronger, otherwise you'll just go a bit faster on a light bike.

    If you like it, rock it!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dirtdan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,612
    The heavier the bike, the harder the climb... Downhills, not so much of a difference...
    I wonder if any pro riders train on heavier bikes to build their legs or if there's some reason why that wouldn't help their riding. I know when I demoed a lighter bike than I was used to riding on trails that I ride often, I beat some previous times I had (according to Strava) by some pretty good margins.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,503
    I think riding a heavier bike will make you a stronger
    rider.

  18. #18
    U sayin' Bolt ?
    Reputation: knutso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    747
    On trails that are twisty and gnarly to the point you have to control your speed, riding a heavier bike will allow you to work harder over the same amout of time.

    On trails where you can go as fast as you want, you can get the same work out in the same time regardless of bike weight.

    I think, psychologically, going faster makes you more energized which makes your workout more intense which makes you stronger.

    So get the bike that best fits your trails and ride the hell out of it, for best results !

  19. #19
    Suckin wind like a boss
    Reputation: big terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,062
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    I think riding a heavier bike will make you a stronger
    rider.
    this is not a haiku. are you not feeling well john?
    If you arent bleeding, you arent riding hard enough.
    http://about.me/bigterry

    Quote Originally Posted by Hutch3637 View Post
    I don't need sex. My life fvcks me daily.

  20. #20
    ONE speed under God.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    190
    Unless you're a competitive racer, I don't really see a huge difference in a 34 lb bike vs a 28 lb bike. Of course you will go a little faster on the lighter bike, but does it really matter?

    All I know is that I once rode the most technical trail in Dallas without getting off on my old Raleigh M80... A 31lb HT with maybe an inch of travel, and that was the only time I was ever able to clean the whole trail, even though years later I was riding a FS Jekyll that weighed about 26 lbs.
    Nashbar SS 29er
    K2 FS Attack
    Cannondale R600

  21. #21
    Life Is Short
    Reputation: fatcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,724
    A heavier bike does make you a stronger rider, its just the law of physics. When I ran track in high school our coach made us drag a car tire around the dirt track. It had some sort of harness. After removing the harness we ran faster.

    I have a couple of kona stinkys with White Bros dual crown forks. They weigh 46 lbs each. When I ride my 31 lb XC bike it feels like
    I'm cheating. By the way, that fork only weighs 16lbs
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Does a heavier bike = a stronger rider? (NO FLAME WAR PLEASE)-dscf0570.jpg  

    Last edited by fatcat; 08-19-2012 at 03:09 PM.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigfruits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    778
    sure it can. but it might not. you could work yourself just as hard with a light bike.
    but if it were true in every case then we have to say that fat people are stronger walkers.

  23. #23
    The Original Suspect
    Reputation: HitmenOnlyInc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,340
    I am going to kinda test the theory out myself. I currently travel between the Ft. Collins area and Phoenix. While in Co I am riding at altitude with a heavier bike. I am looking forward to seeing the difference when I get back to Az.

  24. #24
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,569
    ALL things being equal, the guy riding the heavier bike will get stronger 'muscles' than the guy riding the lighter bike.

    I know where you're coming from with this question. Its all about the silver lining and I'll take it! I've been there, long climb, gasping for breath, legs screaming on my 1x9 32lb AM bike...thinking, "well, at least its a great leg workout!"
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of a low price is forgotten." - Benjamin Franklin

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    433
    It all probably levels out in the end. A lighter bike would probably just mean you push yourself that much harder to achieve the same level of exertion. At least that is what I tend to do if I switch from mountain to road biking.

    At the same time, training on a heavier bike and then switching to a lighter one is probably not a bad strategy for better performance. I used to practice throw-ins for soccer with an old bowling ball. After working with that thing for a while, I could send a regular ball halfway across the field!

    As many have said, if you are having fun, that is all that matters.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •