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  1. #1
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    Do seatposts matter?

    Hi!

    I'm buying parts for a Surly 1x1. I'm trying not to obsess, but too late!

    Do you guys think seatposts matter? Would you rather buy:

    Race Face Evolve, 265 g, $50, GREAT reviews

    Race Face Ride XC, 295 g, $30, good reviews

    Easton EA50 2 Bolt, 310 g, $25, very good reviews

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Do seatposts matter?

    Quote Originally Posted by carrielovesbikes View Post
    Hi!

    I'm buying parts for a Surly 1x1. I'm trying not to obsess, but too late!

    Do you guys think seatposts matter? Would you rather buy:

    Race Face Evolve, 265 g, $50, GREAT reviews

    Race Face Ride XC, 295 g, $30, good reviews

    Easton EA50 2 Bolt, 310 g, $25, very good reviews
    Seat posts matter very much. You absolutely need one.

    Any of the posts on your list are fine as long as they can put the saddle where you need it.
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  3. #3
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    I have the Race Face Turbine which is similar to the Evolve. It's a great seat post. It's probably the easiest to set the correct angle of any seat post I have had. The angle adjuster is independent of the rail clamp. I love it. But the others will work too and once you adjust it once you usually never have to change it.

  4. #4
    No Stranger to danger....
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    Shiggys right, as long as it puts the saddle where you want it, and it has a good clamping system on to the rails then its good to go.

    I once made the mistake of buying a KORE seatpost, the clamp system was so bad that when you put weight on the back of the seat the rails would pop off the seatpost, it had 4 very small points of contact, i think they might have changed them now, but it was a total dud.
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  5. #5
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    A good seat post will be light weight, hold the seat and not break. Some posts are very heavy, some break, and some don't hold the seat in right position.

    My entry level bike has very strong well working seat post, but it weighs a ton. My current bike has much lighter seat post, but the one before that broke on me. I am 155lbs so it was not due to large rider size either.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  6. #6
    Five is right out
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    Ditto, as long as you get a seatpost with a decent clamping arrangement, they are all fine.

    I have had one seatpost out of seven or eight which sucked- a Chinese Ti Moots knockoff. It had a terrible clamp design. Otherwise, I have had Coda, Easton aluminium and CF, a Gravity Dropper, FSA and Giant. All were perfectly good.

    Here's hoping to the thread staying sane and not turning into a Brand T fanboi love-fest.

  7. #7
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    You can't go wrong with a Thomson. A lot of top brands' top builds use the Thomson Elite. I've got one and it does its job flawless...which isn't saying much, given how simple its job is, but it does it well for about $90.
    I live with fear and danger every day. And on the weekends she lets me go mountain biking.

  8. #8
    Five is right out
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    And here we go...

    Note the Thomson is 2 to 4 times more expensive than anything the OP has listed

  9. #9
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    I have Thompson seatposts on two of my bikes, and a XLC FeeBay cheapo that cost me $18 on another bike. I ride the bike with the XLC almost everyday and it has not failed me, ever.

    Of course, the Thomson posts look great, aesthetically.

  10. #10
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    I bought a tomson for the reputation. But when i got it I wan't that impressed actually. I uses 2 bolts to set the saddle angle. I will probably work out fine though. I like the less exclusive "microadjust" one big bolt system with teeth on both interlocking parts. Its totally idiot proof IMO, You just set the angle and tighten hard. done.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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    Specialized sucks ass.

  11. #11
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    I hate seatposts with interlocking teeth. More often than not, the perfect angle for your saddle does not happen to be where the teeth line up. I always make sure to get a saddle with the ability to make infinite adjustments to angle.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdan View Post
    I hate seatposts with interlocking teeth. More often than not, the perfect angle for your saddle does not happen to be where the teeth line up. I always make sure to get a saddle with the ability to make infinite adjustments to angle.
    Yeah I thought this was important too for a couple of years, but it turned out for me that it wasn't that precise to begin with, hey a degree here or there. when you start riding it it turns out you need totally different angles and such anyway, and then it just stopped being important. those "microadjust" posts are fine enough according to me at least. the actual angle is not that critical if you ask me. I used to ride my bike every day, at least one hour, for many years (commuting).

    I( still feel that kind of post has its merits, cheap, and simple (and usually the lock is strong), and the angle is always "close enough" if you think about it. I did. for many years.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdan View Post
    I hate seatposts with interlocking teeth. More often than not, the perfect angle for your saddle does not happen to be where the teeth line up. I always make sure to get a saddle with the ability to make infinite adjustments to angle.
    Same here. I have one such seatpost and my favorite saddles don't work on the darn thing because I can't get the angle right. Not a big deal on a 30-60 minute ride, but any longer than that and my balls hurt or I start sliding off the front of the saddle. For whatever reason I'm very sensitive to the saddle angle.

    As for recommendations, Nukeproof Warhead. Same design concept as the Thomson right down to the ovalized inner bore for light weight and maximum strength. And at a fraction of the price. Bought one for my bike last year, works great, love it. The only better one I've used is the Salsa Shaft, but that one's long discontinued and hard to find.

  14. #14
    usually cranky
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    most rigid post out there are good enough. all more expensive posts really offer is better looks.

  15. #15
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    I am a big fan of the two bolt clamp design. I have an Easton I got on clearance on my commuter and a Thomson on my mtb. Both work great. The clamp area is a little bigger on the Thomson, which I wanted on the mtb to cut down on bent seat rails I kept getting from cheap posts with crappy clamps. It's been on there several years without a problem. The OEM seatpost on that bike wore out and would not clamp anymore. It was one of those single bolt designs with the teeth. The teeth all stripped out after a number of years.

    I have had the Easton only for about a year and a half on my commuter. It holds a Brooks saddle and has been equally problem-free since I've owned it. The clamp is not much smaller than the Thomson, so it would probably not make much difference in bent seat rails as compared to the Thomson.

    Beware of any post where the clamp areas are offset, as they increase the risk of bent seat rails.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    Yeah I thought this was important too for a couple of years, but it turned out for me that it wasn't that precise to begin with, hey a degree here or there. when you start riding it it turns out you need totally different angles and such anyway, and then it just stopped being important. those "microadjust" posts are fine enough according to me at least. the actual angle is not that critical if you ask me. I used to ride my bike every day, at least one hour, for many years (commuting).

    I( still feel that kind of post has its merits, cheap, and simple (and usually the lock is strong), and the angle is always "close enough" if you think about it. I did. for many years.
    I don't mean/want to start a pissing contest, but when you're doing century rides monthly and 5,000+ miles/year, if you ask me, having the seat angle where I like it is the difference between feeling only a little fatigued after a long ride or having body aches when I'm done. My long ass rides spending the whole day in the saddle got a lot nicer once I ditched the tooth style seatposts.

  17. #17
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    yeah maybe you're right, I just felt these cheaper designs can be adjusted "close enough" to the ideal angle (for me at least) to forget about it. Then again I almost never ride for more than 2 hours.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  18. #18
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    I'll second the comment above about the Race Face posts having great, separate fore/aft and angle adjustments. You'll have to decide if the weight savings is worth the money between the models you indicated. I have the RF Evolve FWIW.

  19. #19
    It's carbon dontcha know.
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    Can generally get a 2nd hand Thomson from ebay for less than $50, I've bought and sold a few as I've changed bikes and required a different size.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  20. #20
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    Seatposts

    As Shiggy stated, the most important criteria for a seatpost are: Does it put the saddle where you want it and keep it there? The first thing I look at with a seatpost is offset.

    I've used a RaceFace Evolve, Thomson, and now using a Truvative Holzfeller.

    RaceFace-strong clamp and easy angle adjustment. But, too much offset; the saddle was always pushed forward to the end of the rails.

    Thomson-Bling factor, zero offset (good for me, maybe not for you). Tightening the clamp adjusts the angle; you must alternate tightening the two bolts repeatedly to maintain saddle angle. I had lots of "saddle creak", could never eliminate the noise no matter how tight I got the bolts.

    My current post is the Holzfeller-5 degree offset (perfect for me), reasonably light. The clamp is similar to the Thomson, but NO CREAKING!

    If the offset is no problem, a RaceFace post is a good, easy to set up option.

  21. #21
    Bro Mountainbiker
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    I have a Thomson elite, black, 14mm setback, 350ish mm length for salesies if you want.

    Thomsons are nice. The only ones that dont work well IMO are Ritcheys. Even tightened to spec, they will tilt under a large force if your weight is on the front of back of the saddle.
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  22. #22
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    I had a ritchey post that came on a Specialized back in the 90's, the post bent in less than a year. I replaced it with a Thomson, I'm still using it today. They also have some fun trails behind the factory.

  23. #23
    Master of the Face Plant
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    I have had the same Thomson post since 2001. I weigh 200 pounds. I have broken bolts on other brands. I bought mine at a discount for $69 plus tax. Worth every penny.
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  24. #24
    Chamois Dropper
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    Here is a good deal if you need a 30.9. I have had good luck with Race Face posts.
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Race Face Evolve XC Seatpost
    2008 GT Force
    Go Veg

  25. #25
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    I ride with a two bolt setup (truvative T20 or easton EA50). I used to ride with a one bolt (the angle fit me just fine). No issues with either. My buddy, OTH, broke the bolt on his one bolt post mid-ride. Bad times for him.



    That's his seatpost sticking out of his camelback. He rode with rest of the day (6-ish miles) with his seat strapped to his frame with some camelback waist straps. I'd have to imagine that even if one bolt broke with on a two bolt system, you might be able to make it back with one bolt (or cannibalize a bolt from a front shifter maybe?). I think the one bolts are larger than most of the rest of the bolts on your bike. Food for thought.

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