• 02-24-2011
    JmZ
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by claydough001
    According to my April 2011 issue of MBA "Mountain Bike Action Magazine" they do.

    Not new, they've run the same story in the past. Bunk then as it is now.
    Say you bought a bike in April of 2011 then you would need to replace the......

    Seatpost: Al- 2 years
    CF- 1 year
    Adjustable Height- 90 day rebuild

    If I was running the absolute lightest, then maybe I'd worry about fatigue. All of the seatposts I've got are all older than that.


    Derailleur Cables: 6 months

    Replace when shifting starts to suffer.

    Rear Derailleur Loop: 6 months

    See above, or when fraying.

    Saddle: 4 years

    When torn, or for whatever reason no longer comfortable. I might replace some sooner than four years.

    Pivot Bearings- 1 year

    Inspect before replace, and it'll depend on who made the bike. Something like a Turner, probably will get a bit more than that.

    Front Derailleur: 2 years

    Nope. When it starts to act up.

    Chain: 4 months

    When it starts to show wear, buy a chain checker or measure the thing.

    Rear Shock: 1 year

    REALLY?!?! Replace a $300+ part once a year? Inspect, rebuild as necessary, replace when I want.

    Cranks: 2 years

    Same stuff. Inspect. Replace rings first, only replace when it is toast.

    Pedals: 2 years

    Because XTR and Eggbeaters are the same. Replace as necessary, not before. Think I'll replace cleats a few times before the pedals.


    Frame: Al- 4 years
    Ti- 5 years
    Steel- 7 years
    CF- 3 years

    They've just discovered that steel frames can get tired? ;) If the frame is in good shape, why would I replace a Ti/Steel or even CF frame? Aluminum - if it is a lightweight racing frame, there may be some merit to it, maybe.

    Stem: 1 year

    Because these always fail without any indication at 12 months and 1 day.

    Brakes: As soon as pads wear past mf's limit (durrr)

    Bars: Al- 1.5 years
    CF- 1 year

    Inspect, inspect, inspect. If I'm running a 80g bar, yeah, it has a lifespan. If the bar is 300g+, it should last a little longer.
    Grips: As needed

    Headset: 1 year

    This should be news to HS that have warranties that are much longer than that.

    Brake Cables: 6 months

    As needed.

    Fork: 2 years

    Rebuild it first. A newer fork probably will work better, but what about the A-C measurement you can't find anymore. Or that the new fork now weighs a pound more. Not always a good idea.

    Wheels: 2 years

    Where there any ads by wheelbuilders/Easton/DT Swiss prominent in the magazine this month?

    Tires: 6 months

    Again as needed.

    Of course it goes on to say this is an estimate based on you riding 10 hours per week year round and where and how hard you ride but you get the picture. What are your thoughts? What are some of your longest lasting components and how did you maintain them? Since pictures are worth a thousand words can those of you who have exceptionally long lasting components please share them?

    Some parts are wear items - tires, tubes, cables, brake pads and chains. They are expected to be replaced as needed. But their schedule looks to be assuming that I beat upon my bike every ride, and don't maintain it. If we all had to use that schedule - we would have drained our trust funds by now. ;)

    MBA is in the business of advertising. The stories are just longer, and nicer ads. The advertising sales probably account for nearly as much as subscriptions and newstand sales.

    They rant about online sites like this - hmm wonder why? Because there is a diversity of opinion where the reader has to think? Because I won't recommended the latest tested bikes or part to solve your dilemma when fixing the old one will do for a lot less $$?

    JmZ
  • 02-25-2011
    Straz85
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JmZ

    They rant about online sites like this - hmm wonder why? Because there is a diversity of opinion where the reader has to think? Because I won't recommended the latest tested bikes or part to solve your dilemma when fixing the old one will do for a lot less $$?

    JmZ

    Yeah, in the March 2011 issue, in the article about choosing the right bike, there were 10 tips. Two of them were:

    "Read our tests" and "Don't read blogs"

    In order words:

    "Buy from our biggest advertisers" and "Don't listen to objective opinions"
  • 02-25-2011
    Fix the Spade
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by claydough001
    According to my April 2011 issue of MBA "Mountain Bike Action Magazine" they do.

    It's Mountain Bike Action...

    Assuming proper maintenance and discounting crash damage, I expect any component to last at least 5+ years. Consumable parts (bearings, seals, chains, jockey wheels) replaced as and when.

    For steel or Ti parts I expect the lifespan to be longer than me, my road bike is steel and from some time in the 1970s. It's ten-ish years older than me and still going strong. Everything but the rims, brake pads and consumable are original and it's probably covered 100'000 miles plus in it's life.

    Having said that, in two years of riding a fork would be stripped down 3-4 times and have the wiper seals replaced with the oil changed a bit more often than that.
  • 02-25-2011
    jmmorath
    Some of that is just funny...

    I came from BMX and granted they were bricks and short, but the only part left standing after years of seriously ridiculous bike molesting abuse was your stem. One year?
  • 02-25-2011
    aerius
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jmmorath
    I came from BMX and granted they were bricks and short, but the only part left standing after years of seriously ridiculous bike molesting abuse was your stem. One year?

    No kidding. I worked as a bike mechanic for 5 years and I've only seen 2 broken stems in all that time. One was an ancient steel stem on a bike that the owner must've left in a pile of slush & salt and the other was on a roof rack mounted bike where the owner had a brainfart and drove under a low bridge at highway speeds. Actually there was a 3rd guy who used an air ratchet to tighten the bolts on his stem and stripped all the threads in the process.
  • 02-25-2011
    NateHawk
    BS, no doubt.

    Let's see, I ride a 2003 Stumpjumper FSR and I have a few original parts on it.

    Of course, the frame - it's about 8yrs old now.
    Front and rear derailleurs
    shifters
    fork and rear shock - but both have been serviced to keep them functioning like new

    Of the parts I've replaced, the brakes are the oldest. I put Magura Julie disc brakes on it about halfway through 03. The pads aren't worn out, but I think I'll replace the pads and bleed the brakes this year just because.

    Everything else has only been replaced either because it was a wear item (chain, cassette, tires, cables, saddle) or because I felt like upgrading it (pedals, cranks, wheels, stem/hbar/grips, seatpost).

    I have replaced the pivot bearings a couple times on the frame, and it seems like they're about due for another replacement. however, since I don't trust my lbs with that job, I'll be buying the tools to press bearings myself and while I'm at it, I'll service my bb and hubs.
  • 02-25-2011
    jmmorath
    Open letter to MBA:

    Dear MBA,

    After careful deliberation of the facts, personal experience, mechanics and physics of bicycle component maintenance and failure, we at mtbr.com have come to the consensus (without getting snarky with one another for a whole day!) that you are full of it (emoticon).

    Sincerely,
    mtbr.com
  • 02-25-2011
    claydough001
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jmmorath
    Open letter to MBA:

    Dear MBA,

    After careful deliberation of the facts, personal experience, mechanics and physics of bicycle component maintenance and failure, we at mtbr.com have come to the consensus (without getting snarky with one another for a whole day!) that you are full of it (emoticon).

    Sincerely,
    mtbr.com

    Im in. Where do i sign? I wanted to start this thread in hope of everybody joining in to say that that is a crock. If it were true i would have to give up the sport. After all.....that is why i gave up golf. My country club dues were too much!
  • 02-25-2011
    claydough001
    I really want some people that have old bikes and components to start posting pictures of their stuff. I want this thread to last and i think that pictures make that happen.
  • 02-25-2011
    ratmonkey
    I guess in the age of the troll, the art of the practical joke is lost.

    APRIL issue. Lol
  • 02-25-2011
    bikewagon
    So what is the expiration date on a good 'ol Thomson SP or Stem? Those dates are killing me.
  • 02-26-2011
    Uncle Six Pack
    I haven't read the whole article yet, but a quick glance definitely gave me a chuckle.... they are obviously pandering to their advertisers by trying to convince readers to spend money when they don't have to.

    I have a 2006 Specialized HR that came with not-top-shelf components.... while I do suffer from upgraditis at times, the wheelset, headset, and bb/cranks are all stock.... hub bearings (loose ball) were replaced.... otherwise, I just clean and grease once or twice a year.... derailleurs, shifters, and levers last forever as long as you don't smash them... handlebars and seatposts will only need to be replaced if they are severely fatigued.... and that generally doesn't happen from casual trail riding...

    The only wear items most riders need to worry about are tires, cables, and chains... and even those do not "expire". Everything else just needs to be maintained properly and inspected. Putting expiration dates is just an idiot-proof way to remind people to spend money when you don't do proper maintenance and inspections. MBA thinks their readers have no common sense.
  • 02-26-2011
    Fix the Spade
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bikewagon
    So what is the expiration date on a good 'ol Thomson SP or Stem? Those dates are killing me.

    For the post, about 30 seconds after you see someone with a ti one...
  • 04-02-2011
    bikedreamer
    I bought that issue, thinking that it might actually have some kind of useful, objective information. I must be optimistic.

    The last sentence in that "article" says it all: If you are a true mountain biking fanatic, chances are you will have moved on to new and improved equipment before coming close to our expiration dates. Nothing like implying that riders are poseurs if they don't buy new components every year or two.

    I also like how MBA tends to gloss over or omit information. In the same issue, the RM Altitude test omits "Descending" as a heading in their testing. I can only assume that the RM therefore is a shitty at going downhill.

    I'm giving up on that rag, and like others have mentioned, buying Cosmo. :)
  • 04-02-2011
    coiler-d
    So according to this article, I should only need to spend about $2k per year on parts, and a new frame every couple years? Hum, I wonder who thrives on a budget made from advertising? :rolleyes:
  • 04-02-2011
    Glide the Clyde
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by coiler-d
    So according to this article, I should only need to spend about $2k per year on parts, and a new frame every couple years? Hum, I wonder who thrives on a budget made from advertising? :rolleyes:

    Yeah but, this is what you spend anyway, a two biker family and all ;)

    Hey, any ride plans this weekend? I'm heading out to the HS team race in Lakewood with the gang.
  • 04-02-2011
    trboxman
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mr. Blonde
    MBA is possibly the $hittiest magazine on earth. I'd rather read Cosmo.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by claydough001
    Why do you say that?

    Because the rides in Cosmo are better, duh!
  • 04-02-2011
    Kona0197
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by coiler-d
    So according to this article, I should only need to spend about $2k per year on parts, and a new frame every couple years? Hum, I wonder who thrives on a budget made from advertising? :rolleyes:

    Good point. Some of us can't afford such luxury.
  • 04-02-2011
    K-OS
    Wow, you guys are too sensitive, keep in mind it's the "April" issue... April Fools !!!
  • 04-02-2011
    XJaredX
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by K-OS
    Wow, you guys are too sensitive, keep in mind it's the "April" issue... April Fools !!!

    Yeah but the thing is, that's such a crappy magazine that I wouldn't know if they are joking or not.

    Dirt Rag for me.
  • 04-02-2011
    Kona0197
    Well it wasn't such a crappy mag with RC at the helm. Just seems to have gone downhill in the last few years. If it was me I would have promoted Zap to be editor instead of Jimmie Mac.
  • 04-02-2011
    kapusta
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by claydough001
    According to my April 2011 issue of MBA "Mountain Bike Action Magazine" they do.

    Say you bought a bike in April of 2011 then you would need to replace the......

    Seatpost: Al- 2 years
    CF- 1 year
    Adjustable Height- 90 day rebuild

    Derailleur Cables: 6 months

    Rear Derailleur Loop: 6 months

    Saddle: 4 years

    Pivot Bearings- 1 year

    Front Derailleur: 2 years

    Chain: 4 months

    Rear Shock: 1 year

    Cranks: 2 years

    Pedals: 2 years

    Frame: Al- 4 years
    Ti- 5 years
    Steel- 7 years
    CF- 3 years

    Stem: 1 year

    Brakes: As soon as pads wear past mf's limit (durrr)

    Bars: Al- 1.5 years
    CF- 1 year

    Grips: As needed

    Headset: 1 year

    Brake Cables: 6 months

    Fork: 2 years

    Wheels: 2 years

    Tires: 6 months

    Of course it goes on to say this is an estimate based on you riding 10 hours per week year round and where and how hard you ride but you get the picture. What are your thoughts? What are some of your longest lasting components and how did you maintain them? Since pictures are worth a thousand words can those of you who have exceptionally long lasting components please share them?

    Is this for real? Did they really say all that? What do these people do? Dunk their bikes in saltwater after each ride and leave it out in the snow all winter?

    Yet another reason why I don't ever read that awful excuse for a mt bike mag, other then for the train-wreck entertainment value. What utter crap. I am not even going to bother answering any of it. Just forget you ever read it, along with anything else those clueless idiots print.
  • 04-03-2011
    Sizzler
    I'm glad you posted that info, I had no idea my bikes were so expired but they're all going straight in the trash before I get salmonella or even botulism from riding them.
  • 04-03-2011
    bloodyknee
    I couldn't afford to ride if I followed their replacement schedule, or I'd have to go with the lowest end, last year's bargin bin sale items. What fun would that be?
  • 04-03-2011
    claydough001
    you should see this months issue. they are pushing a 10,000 dollar specialized kissing some major Specialized A$$. It is a cool bike tho.