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  1. #1
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    Ditched the CamelBak

    So I finally put a bottle cage on my mountain bike and got a pack to hang under my seat. What made me do this was the fact that it got pretty cold and windy on my local trails today and since I sweat like a crackhead, I usually get damp with sweat under my Camelbak. When the cold wind blows...it can make riding that much more uncomfortable..and cold.
    Anyway, I noticed I enjoyed the change. Having all that weight on the bike rather than on me, seemed to lower the center of gravity and I felt I could handle noticeably better. Also, I had no weight on my back I felt I could get squirlier as well with my upper body.
    I know this a no-brainer for some people who race but for those who have only used the Camelbak, bottles and saddle bags offer a different riding experience.
    I will concede,however, that for epic rides, a CamelBak cannot be beat. Just my $0.02.

  2. #2
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    O noticed I'm a lot more comfortable without one on my back. I don't wear one if its only 6 miles or so. When I raced gnccs on dirt bikes I started out with a camelback and noticed it was just a pita. Left it off and was much more comfortable.

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  3. #3
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    I'm also using less the blader, even if I still carry the backpack. A bottle is so much easy to clean. Bladers are always a PITA to clean and keep them that way. I only use them on serious +40 miles rides

  4. #4
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    I'll probably never give up my Camelbak. I only put water in it so I don't have cleaning issues & it doubles as a carrier for tools & spare tubes.

  5. #5
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    Congrats.

    I only use a Camelback on really long rides where there is not reliable water source and when it is less than 40 degrees out (so that I can pack items to deal with mechanical issues that require more than a few minutes to fix and avoid freezing my arse off).

  6. #6
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    I only take my camelback on the longer rides these days. I just put an insulated water bottle in the bottle cage and I have a 'minimalist' seat pack.

  7. #7
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    I too just added a cage last month. I still use the camelpak on long rides but for the short lunch rides it saves me the weight and time.
    "Ideal bikes are not bought, they evolve beneath you"

  8. #8
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    I only use one on rides over three hours, and then only if there is no readily available water to refill bottles.

  9. #9
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    I just think it's liberating to not have that extra 5-10 lbs on your back. Feels like how riding a bike should be. They make extra large bottles that fit into conventional cages. I might look into one of those.

  10. #10
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    Yup......ditches the hydration pack about 3 years ago. Water bottles on rides up to 3 hours. 2 cages on the bike......if I feel the need, I may throw a 20 oz bottle in my jersey pocket.

    Foun I was carrying a pack with 100 oz of water plus a bunch of crap that I didn't need, even on short rides. Would get done with a 2 hr ride and there would still be 70 oz of water in the bladder. No sense in carrying 8 lbs of water I wasn't going to drink.

    Plus I feel way more comfortable standing on the singlespeed without the pack.

    Does feel funny now when I do have to wear it.
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  11. #11
    Plays with tools
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    I hate hydration packs with a passion, but sometimes they are a necessary evil. I don't cary a saddle bag either. I take all of that crap and place it into a ziploc bag and it goes in my center jersey pocket.

  12. #12
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    I also carry my camelbak on longer rides, on short ones I use this CamelBak Delaney Plus Hydration Lumbar Pack - 153cu in | Backcountry.com

  13. #13
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    I too have ditched the camelback except for rides that are 2+ hours. I use a large water bottle and pack with enough room for a tube and levers on short rides.

  14. #14
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    Interesting. I bought a Camelbak because I would run out of water on long rides. These days my rides rarely break and hour and a half.

    I use my Camelbak mostly for tools, spare tube, cameras and a saw for impromptu trail clearing. I could probably reconfigure to fit most stuff in an underseat pack, but I have always hated the rattling of tools in a bike-mounted bag. I'm the guy who carries lots of tools to avoid getting stranded. I also don't mind having extra water in case I were to crash and be incapacitated for a while.

    My shoulders could sure use a break though.

  15. #15
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    I also have first aid in my camelbak.

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  16. #16
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    I usually end up with both the camelbak and a water bottle. H20 in the pack, and a electrolyte drink in the bottle...I've often ran out of both in the Texas heat. Also carry a tube or 2, my blackburn minipump, and a couple tools in the bag. And basic first aid stuff.

    Even with all of that though, it's pretty dang light...Not even enough to hardly notice IMO

  17. #17
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    I only use my camelbak on longer rides or if the weather is a little warm for my liking. Otherwise I only use a water bottle.

  18. #18
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    I ditched the camelback years ago. It's cooler in the summer and not having weight on my back seems to help my achy back. I usually have two waterbottle mounts. If I need more I'll stick a small bottle in my back jersey pocket. Once the first bottle runs out I'll swap that one in my jersey pocket.
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  19. #19
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    I feel naked without my Camelbak. Plus the unfortunate times that I've landed flat on my back made me glad to have it.

  20. #20
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    I prefer the convenience of the tube to drink from. Having to steer and pedal is a bit much while reaching below me for a drink. Maybe I'm just not coordinated enough for a drink holder. I do have a cage on the road bike however.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  21. #21
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    One thing that can mess a ride up is running out of water. The extra weight is well worth the peace of mind knowing that if something does go wrong I still got water.

  22. #22
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    I've ditched mine, too. I hated riding with all that weight on my back. I'm sure I'll use it on super long rides, but for 99% of my rides I do just fine without it. I have a bottle cage. Only thing I sometimes wish is that I had a place to mount a second bottle cage on my bike

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    I've ditched mine, too. I hated riding with all that weight on my back. I'm sure I'll use it on super long rides, but for 99% of my rides I do just fine without it. I have a bottle cage. Only thing I sometimes wish is that I had a place to mount a second bottle cage on my bike
    That is my problem too! My full suspension only has enough holes for one cage!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    That is my problem too! My full suspension only has enough holes for one cage!
    I might get some bungee cords and see if I can attach a second bottle to the back of my seat post. Not sure how well it'd work, but it's worth a try.

  25. #25
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    I saw one on the tour de wyoming that someone had that wrapped around the outside of the cage itself and held A LOT of water. Tried to find it on the internet but I can't!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    I might get some bungee cords and see if I can attach a second bottle to the back of my seat post. Not sure how well it'd work, but it's worth a try.
    no need for bungee cords. Specialized makes some clamps that will attach to your seatpost. Works great unless you have a dropper post. Oh, and if your seat post is larger than 31.9 I think your SOL. I used them on a 27.2 seatpost, cut some tubes up to help them fit.

  27. #27
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    Only use mine if I'm riding more than one 24oz bottle in distance.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  28. #28
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    I bring no water because it weighs too much

  29. #29
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    OK.... My deal, I use a fanny pack. The camel bak is nice when it's 104 out, but other wise I carry my water in the fanny pack with tools, food, and such.

    I've always been told to keep the weight off the bike.

    The fanny back rides low on my hips, hardly know it's there.
    Ride Hard or Ride Home Alone.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by schoolisbad1 View Post
    I bring no water because it weighs too much
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by motopail View Post
    OK.... My deal, I use a fanny pack. The camel bak is nice when it's 104 out, but other wise I carry my water in the fanny pack with tools, food, and such.

    I've always been told to keep the weight off the bike.

    The fanny back rides low on my hips, hardly know it's there.
    I'd rather have that little extra weight off of my body and on the bike. I, myself, will have to propel all of that weight anyway. I also would rather have that weight sit low than up high. To each his/her own though!

  32. #32
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    I like that my camelback protects my spine. If I go on a short ride I'll often fill up a couple extra water bottles and stick them inside to make the ride feel longer and to make the hills more substantial. I like to bring plenty of tools with me. 2 Spare tubes, spare hanger, spare derailleur, needle nose pliers, assortment of zip ties, extra sealant, cell phone, wallet, keys, toilet paper, rain jacket, arm and leg warmers, multi-tool, full sized 5mm allen for straightening hanger(saved me many times).

    I want to get one of those portable cassette removal tools, as I've definitely had to walk a few miles because my hanger got bent and my chain became mega stuck behind the cassette (thank lob for the pie plate that protected my spokes).

    I'm not into racing as when I've raced I find it makes me think of every ride as a training ride and that leads to me enjoying it less. Much of my work is with developing statistics and new algorithms to estimate them, so ignoring numbers when I'm on the bike is a relief. But if I wanted to go extra fast and efficient, I would try to lose as much of that weight as possible, and if the mileage allowed, I'd abandon my camelback too. But for the regular rides that are 99.999% of my riding, I like to be ready for almost any concievable contingency.

  33. #33
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    What about those with dropper posts? Where else could u store your tools/tube than a camelback?
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaverwins View Post
    What about those with dropper posts? Where else could u store your tools/tube than a camelback?
    They make all sorts of packs you can put on different locations on your bike's frame tubes. I am not saying ditching Camelbaks is always the best for everyone, but for me personally, if I am going under 10 miles in warm weather, I can fit all I need in my pack and my one large 33 oz water bottle. I enjoy the "light" feeling I have without 8 lbs of junk on my upper back. But like I said, to each his/her own. That's the great thing about mountain biking is you do what suits you best.

  35. #35
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    I prefer to run minimal. Only xc race i did, ran a water bottle and no tools and loved it. Just trying to figure out the best method to go that route but keep a tube, super glue, multitool all with me as well.

    Ride solo a lot so ill likely camel then so i have my phone with me.
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  36. #36
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    By ditchng the Camelback for shorter rides you are acutally losing weigh. On average a Camelbak can weigh arounts 6-10 lbs where as a water bottle and seat pack weigh arount 2-3 lbs. On longer rides (time wise) and/or hot days I think carrying a Camelback is essential sometimes with a water bottle as well.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaverwins View Post
    I prefer to run minimal. Only xc race i did, ran a water bottle and no tools and loved it. Just trying to figure out the best method to go that route but keep a tube, super glue, multitool all with me as well.

    Ride solo a lot so ill likely camel then so i have my phone with me.
    No, I hear ya. If you Google 'bike pouches' you will see all sorts of clever bags to put on your bike. In my little seat post bag I am able to fit 1 tube, Co2 pump and cartridge, crank brothers multi-tool, 1 contact lense (just in case i have contact issues) and my cell phone. It was a Walmart special for $15. It's packed tight but does the job.
    This is only when I am riding a shorter ride on trails I know l like the back of my hand. Epic rides get the full CamelBak treatment.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaverwins View Post
    What about those with dropper posts? Where else could u store your tools/tube than a camelback?
    What's a dropper post????


    Don't use one so it is not a problem.























    And yes, I know what a dropper post is.
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  39. #39
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    Fortunately it rarely gets hot enough around here to make a backpack uncomfortable, pack all the way. The lower center of gravity does make sense but I still prefer the bike to weigh as little as possible.

    Water
    First aid
    Tube
    Patch kit
    Multi tool
    Pump
    Snacks
    Map
    Compass
    Phone
    Camera - if I'm so inclined
    Emergency blanket - depending on ride

    I will be adding zip ties that's a great idea! Maybe some strong tape.

    I should also mention that I to have been happy to have the bag on after a coupe if tumbles.
    Michael

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  40. #40
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    I will never go back to a regular post. Its the biggest mtb part to come out in a long time.
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by geraldooka View Post
    Fortunately it rarely gets hot enough around here to make a backpack uncomfortable, pack all the way. The lower center of gravity does make sense but I still prefer the bike to weigh as little as possible.

    Water
    First aid
    Tube
    Patch kit
    Multi tool
    Pump
    Snacks
    Map
    Compass
    Phone
    Camera - if I'm so inclined
    Emergency blanket - depending on ride

    I will be adding zip ties that's a great idea! Maybe some strong tape.

    I should also mention that I to have been happy to have the bag on after a coupe if tumbles.
    To me the advantage of ditching the CamelBak is more clear in the cold. If I am riding hard in the cold my back gets damp with sweat under my CamelBak (I sweat like Charlie Sheen going a day without some blow). When the harsh wind blows on a wet back, it sucks. I live in Wyoming though so that is probably not a problem for most if you.

  42. #42
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    F it. Im trying this out tomorrow. Post strap is loose and rubs no more than a ziptie or oring on a fork id say.

    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  43. #43
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    ^Be sure to report back! ^

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    I prefer the convenience of the tube to drink from. Having to steer and pedal is a bit much while reaching below me for a drink. Maybe I'm just not coordinated enough for a drink holder. I do have a cage on the road bike however.
    Interestingly enough, I'm just the opposite. I ride XC and my breathing rate is always so high that it messes with trying to get enough water out of the tube. It's so much easier for me to gulp down a bunch of water from one big squeeze of the bottle between breaths.

    I'm right handed and I can easily steer with my left and grab the bottle with my right. If I try the opposite hands I fumble for the bottle and feel like I'm going to run off the trail.

  45. #45
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    i ditched the camelback also. I do short rides on a small loop so a water bottle and seatbag are enough for me.

  46. #46
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    I like having a pack but generally do not use a bladder except for longer rides, I hydrate well the day before and at least a couple hours before I leave so a single bottle usually lasts me a short ride.

  47. #47
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    I have gone back and forth over the years. I am actually considering doing a bottle and the gear in the jersey pocket again just to feel that "freedom" of not having the weight on your back. But honestly, you can't beat the drink-on-demand ability of a hydration pack. I also like the minimalist look of straps that you just strap the tube etc. to your seat/seatpost with.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 10-06-2012 at 04:08 AM.
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  48. #48
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    During summer, if I want to drink something, I don't have much choice but to wear my camelbak. My bottles are for my dog(s). During winter, they eat snow as we go. I use the new LR version so there is no sloshing water as I move.


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  49. #49
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    I put a new Elite cage on my bike today and ordered an Awesome Strap. Sometimes its nice to change it up. I do like the feeling of not having something on my back.
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  50. #50
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    Weather in the 60s and i rolled with no camelbak. Saddle bag was fine on the drop post. Gonna be running this setup as much as possible while its not tx summer weather
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  51. #51
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    This is kinda ironic after 10 miles of wicked trails today. I'm so glad I have a camelbak. I broke my pump mount in a crash so had to store it in my camelbak. I'm now taking seat bag off and just running a camelbak.

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  52. #52
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    Here is my freedom-from-the-Camelbak set up. Awesome strap under the seat and the Tülbag in the jersey pocket.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ditched the CamelBak-img_1623.jpg  

    Ditched the CamelBak-img_1624.jpg  

    Ditched the CamelBak-img_1625.jpg  

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  53. #53
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    ^^^Nice^^^^^^

  54. #54
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    Horse crap!
    Best arguement for a camelback, I don't have to clean it before every drink.
    Happy Trails
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  55. #55
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    My camelback holds more stuff than I could put on the bike. Plus IMO it's a ghetto spine protector. Fallen many times on my back and never even tweaked it. Never had a bladder burst either.

    Whatever works for you.

  56. #56
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    Rode with a CB for years, but moved away from it a few years ago. Two insulated bottles in cages and depending on the ride, a third bottle in center jersey pocket. Pouch under the seat holds multi tool, co2 + an extra canister. Spare tube is fastened to stem with a velcro strap.

    Only bad experience was running out of water with 5 miles to go at about 930 in the morning this past June. It was already in the upper 90's and it was absolutely miserable getting back to the car. Only time I was actually concerned about becoming a statistic! A late start, and forgetting my third bottle were the main factors. I did not adjust my route and still did the 33 mile loop anyway. Poor decision making process on my part.

    If you plan on ditching the CB, make sure plan accordingly as you won't have your 70/100 oz bladder to rely on.

  57. #57
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    Funny I dropped the camelbak this spring after finding mold in the drink tube. It has been working out great until this past week when I wanted to ride longer but had to return for more water. So I am about to pick up a new bladder for my camelbak classic. I also have a larger pack style camelbak but that is too much pack for my needs. I will moclty use bottles but want a camelbak for longer rides. I also picked up a small seat pack. I will keep a multi tool and chain link in there. Also wrap your tools in a rag to keep them from making noise and bouncing around.

    I was browsing the camelbak website and they suggest putting your empty bladder in the freezer so you dont get mold.
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  58. #58
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    My Specialized came with bottle cage brackets for the seatpost.
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  59. #59
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    I used a larger blowfish camelbak for years then switch to another similar size but once I went to this really light slimline pack it was a huge difference. Packs all I need plus up to 70oz of water. I drink alot when I ride, a bottle wont cut it for me.

    One thing that occurs not too often is the full OTB landing on your back, the pack sure softened that up. If you go on short rides just dont top it off. Using tabs like Nuns also have no sugar so cleanup not much different than a bottle.


  60. #60
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    I can't drop the Camelback because stopping for a drink or riding one handed over rough terrain could really hurt my Strava times.

    It also makes a convenient holder for the stick I use to beat dead horses.


  61. #61
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    Today was abnormally warm here in Wyoming and we do not have snow around 8000 ft yet so I got to do two rides in December for the first time ever. Enjoyed my CamelBak-free ride. I tend to know my limits pretty well, if its under ten miles, I can ride with only bottles. To me I can shred extra hard without all the crap on my back and all the water weight down low. If it's gonna be any sort of epic ride, CamelBak all the way.

  62. #62
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    I carry a lot of extra stuff - first aid kit, tube, tools, bars, gels, pump, extra layers, etc - so I just don't see myself ditching the hydration pack. I'm not racing and not a weight weenie so the extra weight means I have what I need for the ride and that I burn a few extra calories, which I need to anyway being a clyde.

  63. #63
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    Only ride as far as you are willing to walk. Some people have little mini kits with a tube, tool, and CO2. This usually doesn't cut it on any serious ride, this is more for like the 5-mile trail in a park or something similar. Getting miles is good and this is maybe part of a training regimen or just some exercise in during the week, but for any serious ride this is fairly unprepared. A tube + pump due to the air pressure and variability of a CO2 system. Then patches just in case something else goes wrong. Multi-tool. Master-link type chain link (I have the special shimano pins, but the sram master-link thing works fine with shimano chains), make sure your mini tool has a chain tool built in, then some food to help keep the glucose up over a couple hours or more, cell-phone and wallet (only an idiot would leave those in the car), and a small first-aid kit, and we are starting to get to the responsible amount of stuff to bring on a ride, and we aren't even talking about water.

    On the other hand, if you are just going out for 45 minutes or less and 5 miles or less and don't mind walking (and it's relatively safe, no bears or cougars), then just bring a water bottle and you are "good".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by RipRoar View Post
    I used a larger blowfish camelbak for years then switch to another similar size but once I went to this really light slimline pack it was a huge difference. Packs all I need plus up to 70oz of water. I drink alot when I ride, a bottle wont cut it for me.

    One thing that occurs not too often is the full OTB landing on your back, the pack sure softened that up. If you go on short rides just dont top it off. Using tabs like Nuns also have no sugar so cleanup not much different than a bottle.

    Ditto,

    I ran a large CB for years but moved recently and not sure where I packed it. So this weekend I went shopping for a new one and picked up one of these smaller lighter units. I'm going to use it on longer rides and a bottle on shorter runs.

  65. #65
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    ^^^ The seriousness of my ride has little to do with whether or not I need a bunch of gear.
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  66. #66
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    I ride with a camelbak mule. Its prolly too much pack, but its all I have at the moment. Looking to get one of the slimline packs for christmas. I do have a Camelback Chill bottle for my road rides, but not for use on the trails. Where I ride trailwise, it gets really grimy and grody and nasty to drink from. So its the backpack.

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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by stygz1 View Post
    ..
    I was browsing the camelbak website and they suggest putting your empty bladder in the freezer so you dont get mold.
    I have been using a camelbak since 1998. I keep them in my fridge with water when not riding or dry them out . I never had mold in my camelbak. I did however throw out the bladder that came in my 1998 camelbak since it leaking at the top. Then again I got many years from that one.

    I had bad experience with tools rubbing a hole in my spare tube in seatpack and after that I moved my tube and tools in my camelbak. My first camelbak was just bladder and simple holder for the bladder. No storage space at all. My next one was mule and it had couple small pockets. My mule is the one from 2002 and it is small and about the size of the current Lobo. This is perfect for most of my rides since I have room for tools, tube, map, clif bar, and even a small sweat rag.

    Joe
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  69. #69
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    I am looking at buying the smallest Osprey raptor pack for my short rides because it sucks when your bottle is covered in mud, dirt and/or sand. And sometimes it gets tricky trying to drink on the fly. I always carry a pack on longer rides anyways.

    Its always worth having extra water, I have washed out wounds, come across young kids in the middle of nowhere with absolutely nothing..............

  70. #70
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    Interesting discussion. My 2 cents:

    I switched from bottles to Camelbak because:
    a) reaching for and drinking from bottles is a huge PITA and throws off my riding rhythm.
    b) as mentioned earlier - horse crap
    c) I drink a ton of water when riding. 2 bottles won't suffice for all but the shortest rides.
    d) I actually prefer to have the water weight on my back than on my bike. Probably just psychological.


    For everyone clammering for a non-pack based hydration system, I found this "seat bag" solution at MEC. No idea if it's any good or not, but thought it was interesting. Seems easier to drink from than a bottle/cage. The hose stays attached to your top tube though, extended with a retractable reel. At 900g, seems heavy though...

    Showers Pass VelEau 42 Hydration System - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available


  71. #71
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    As seldom as I use them, there have been some long, hot days in the desert and some long days in the back-country when I was glad to have the extra water and/or gear capacity of one of my hydration packs. That being said, I don't use them for most rides.

    Photo below shows the setup for my 36+ mile / 4 hour ride yesterday in temps around 55F: Tube, CO2, patch kit, zip ties, multi-tool, chain tool, extra CO2 cartridges, chain links, duct tape, etc in the seat bag. Gels, jacket, shoe covers, phone and wallet in my jersey pockets. 2 bottles on the bike and no pack. (It should be noted that the loop had bail out points.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ditched the CamelBak-ridepic.jpg  


  72. #72
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    I use a bottle at Alafia which is setup so you can quickly return to the truck for a refill or repair. At Boyette where it's 2mi of dbl track to hit the first trail and then 6-8 depending on what route to get to the best trail, I use my camelback

  73. #73
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    When I don't wear the cb it feels like I'm not "strapped in" like I didn't put on the 5pt before a race lol.
    And I've found the best way to keep the bladder clean is to just throw it in the freezer.

  74. #74
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    I could not do a full day's ride without my MULE. It is overkill storage-wise for mountain biking but the fit and comfort of it is superb. I can got through a 100oz bladder on a 4.5 hour long cool day. I can go through the 100oz bladder in a little over 2.5 hours on a hot day. I would NOT be able to ride how I do on just 2-3 bottles. I also prefer to have the weight on my body rather than the bike. with the MULE firmly strapped to be it literally feels like part of my body. When I'm carrying bottles and bags on my bike I feel I lose some flick-ability in turns and the bike because slightly more sluggish to bunny hop. I may try bottles again in the future but for now my Camelbak is the only way to go.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2Slo4U View Post
    no need for bungee cords. Specialized makes some clamps that will attach to your seatpost. Works great unless you have a dropper post. Oh, and if your seat post is larger than 31.9 I think your SOL. I used them on a 27.2 seatpost, cut some tubes up to help them fit.
    I looked into this option, but I'm thinking if I have my water bottle on the seat post, where am I putting my small under saddle pouch with my spare tube and tools?

  76. #76
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  77. #77
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    I use the bottle holder for gatorade,the camelbak for water, pump, clothes, food and most importantly, BEER, and bacon

  78. #78
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    i used to wear a camelbak when i was dh'ing at ski mountains... after a while i didn't like the weight and it shifting around. i started leaving 1gal. water jugs at the top and bottom. , XC'ing, if not venturing to far i'll rock the water bottles, if a tire pops or something breaks it's not a long walk back to the car. if going way off the beaten path, camelback, tools, small 1st aid kit, snacks....


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  79. #79
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    I keep most everything in my saddle bag, have a water bottle and am going to get a Camelbak this Xmas. At the end of the day, I'm riding because I enjoy it and I'm not worried about an extra 8 lbs. If I'm lucky, I'll lose 8 lbs by riding more and it'll be like I'm not wearing a bag!

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8 View Post
    i used to wear a camelbak when i was dh'ing at ski mountains... after a while i didn't like the weight and it shifting around. i started leaving 1gal. water jugs at the top and bottom. , XC'ing, if not venturing to far i'll rock the water bottles, if a tire pops or something breaks it's not a long walk back to the car. if going way off the beaten path, camelback, tools, small 1st aid kit, snacks....
    I got a small water bottle I could stick in my snowboarding pants pocket, that works nice for that, and many resorts have water jugs at the lifts, so you can fill it up, if not, then just a quick trip in the lodge for more water. That plus some food in the other pockets works well for me. Due to the nature of that sport, it's not like being away from services all day long, like riding (as long as you're at a resort).

    On the other hand, big dumps where you need some safety stuff, then bring a pack.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  81. #81
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    With the cooler weather lately, I took a 35oz bottle in the cage and left the camelbak at home. It was a much nicer ride with the back not getting as sweaty and without all the additional weight on my back, it felt like I had more body control on the bike.
    Bikes, lots'o bikes

  82. #82
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    I just 2 rides on my road bike without my camelbak. I am training for sprint tri this weekend and don't want to put it on my back in the transitions. Anyway I practiced with a bottle and will run that at the Tri.

    However I don't really like it. Sure it is nice to not have anything on your back. But the water tasted dirty when got a drink. Even on a road bike the road grime on on the bottle.Yuck.. Plus when moving it was harder to drink. My Tri is just a sprint so at 14 miles on the bike water not a must so will just keep a bottle on there. However for real road rides. I just probably will go with a small seat pack for tube, tire lever and pump. Then use my old 1998 vintage camelbak classic which is nothing more that a sleeve for the bladder. Zero storage and 70 oz of water. I can still run 2 bottles on my road bike to have more and just stop and clean them.

    For the mtn bike I am sticking with my older smaller mule.
    Joe
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  83. #83
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    There are bottles with lids to keep out the grime. However, they are a bit of a pain. They are easy to open, but it's just that much more time that you are riding with one hand off the bars.



    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I just 2 rides on my road bike without my camelbak. I am training for sprint tri this weekend and don't want to put it on my back in the transitions. Anyway I practiced with a bottle and will run that at the Tri.

    However I don't really like it. Sure it is nice to not have anything on your back. But the water tasted dirty when got a drink. Even on a road bike the road grime on on the bottle.Yuck.. Plus when moving it was harder to drink. My Tri is just a sprint so at 14 miles on the bike water not a must so will just keep a bottle on there. However for real road rides. I just probably will go with a small seat pack for tube, tire lever and pump. Then use my old 1998 vintage camelbak classic which is nothing more that a sleeve for the bladder. Zero storage and 70 oz of water. I can still run 2 bottles on my road bike to have more and just stop and clean them.

    For the mtn bike I am sticking with my older smaller mule.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shibby View Post
    There are bottles with lids to keep out the grime. However, they are a bit of a pain. They are easy to open, but it's just that much more time that you are riding with one hand off the bars.

    Bottles like this are perfect if you stop. However it makes camelbak system much easier and worth the penalty. IMHO. If you only drink when stopped a bottle is not so bad. Personally I love drinking on the fly.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5",Vassago Verhauen SS 29" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  85. #85
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    100% agree - I love my Camelbak. Just throwing the option out there....

    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Bottles like this are perfect if you stop. However it makes camelbak system much easier and worth the penalty. IMHO. If you only drink when stopped a bottle is not so bad. Personally I love drinking on the fly.

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