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  1. #51
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    This is kinda ironic after 10 miles of wicked trails today. I'm so glad I have a camelbak. I broke my pump mount in a crash so had to store it in my camelbak. I'm now taking seat bag off and just running a camelbak.

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  2. #52
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    Here is my freedom-from-the-Camelbak set up. Awesome strap under the seat and the Tülbag in the jersey pocket.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ditched the CamelBak-img_1623.jpg  

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    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  3. #53
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    ^^^Nice^^^^^^

  4. #54
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    Horse crap!
    Best arguement for a camelback, I don't have to clean it before every drink.
    Happy Trails
    Jolly

  5. #55
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    My camelback holds more stuff than I could put on the bike. Plus IMO it's a ghetto spine protector. Fallen many times on my back and never even tweaked it. Never had a bladder burst either.

    Whatever works for you.

  6. #56
    livin' the dream......
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    Rode with a CB for years, but moved away from it a few years ago. Two insulated bottles in cages and depending on the ride, a third bottle in center jersey pocket. Pouch under the seat holds multi tool, co2 + an extra canister. Spare tube is fastened to stem with a velcro strap.

    Only bad experience was running out of water with 5 miles to go at about 930 in the morning this past June. It was already in the upper 90's and it was absolutely miserable getting back to the car. Only time I was actually concerned about becoming a statistic! A late start, and forgetting my third bottle were the main factors. I did not adjust my route and still did the 33 mile loop anyway. Poor decision making process on my part.

    If you plan on ditching the CB, make sure plan accordingly as you won't have your 70/100 oz bladder to rely on.

  7. #57
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    Funny I dropped the camelbak this spring after finding mold in the drink tube. It has been working out great until this past week when I wanted to ride longer but had to return for more water. So I am about to pick up a new bladder for my camelbak classic. I also have a larger pack style camelbak but that is too much pack for my needs. I will moclty use bottles but want a camelbak for longer rides. I also picked up a small seat pack. I will keep a multi tool and chain link in there. Also wrap your tools in a rag to keep them from making noise and bouncing around.

    I was browsing the camelbak website and they suggest putting your empty bladder in the freezer so you dont get mold.
    2014 Niner RIP 9
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  8. #58
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    My Specialized came with bottle cage brackets for the seatpost.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  9. #59
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    I used a larger blowfish camelbak for years then switch to another similar size but once I went to this really light slimline pack it was a huge difference. Packs all I need plus up to 70oz of water. I drink alot when I ride, a bottle wont cut it for me.

    One thing that occurs not too often is the full OTB landing on your back, the pack sure softened that up. If you go on short rides just dont top it off. Using tabs like Nuns also have no sugar so cleanup not much different than a bottle.


  10. #60
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    I can't drop the Camelback because stopping for a drink or riding one handed over rough terrain could really hurt my Strava times.

    It also makes a convenient holder for the stick I use to beat dead horses.


  11. #61
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    Today was abnormally warm here in Wyoming and we do not have snow around 8000 ft yet so I got to do two rides in December for the first time ever. Enjoyed my CamelBak-free ride. I tend to know my limits pretty well, if its under ten miles, I can ride with only bottles. To me I can shred extra hard without all the crap on my back and all the water weight down low. If it's gonna be any sort of epic ride, CamelBak all the way.

  12. #62
    Climbs = necessary evil
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    I carry a lot of extra stuff - first aid kit, tube, tools, bars, gels, pump, extra layers, etc - so I just don't see myself ditching the hydration pack. I'm not racing and not a weight weenie so the extra weight means I have what I need for the ride and that I burn a few extra calories, which I need to anyway being a clyde.

  13. #63
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    Only ride as far as you are willing to walk. Some people have little mini kits with a tube, tool, and CO2. This usually doesn't cut it on any serious ride, this is more for like the 5-mile trail in a park or something similar. Getting miles is good and this is maybe part of a training regimen or just some exercise in during the week, but for any serious ride this is fairly unprepared. A tube + pump due to the air pressure and variability of a CO2 system. Then patches just in case something else goes wrong. Multi-tool. Master-link type chain link (I have the special shimano pins, but the sram master-link thing works fine with shimano chains), make sure your mini tool has a chain tool built in, then some food to help keep the glucose up over a couple hours or more, cell-phone and wallet (only an idiot would leave those in the car), and a small first-aid kit, and we are starting to get to the responsible amount of stuff to bring on a ride, and we aren't even talking about water.

    On the other hand, if you are just going out for 45 minutes or less and 5 miles or less and don't mind walking (and it's relatively safe, no bears or cougars), then just bring a water bottle and you are "good".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by RipRoar View Post
    I used a larger blowfish camelbak for years then switch to another similar size but once I went to this really light slimline pack it was a huge difference. Packs all I need plus up to 70oz of water. I drink alot when I ride, a bottle wont cut it for me.

    One thing that occurs not too often is the full OTB landing on your back, the pack sure softened that up. If you go on short rides just dont top it off. Using tabs like Nuns also have no sugar so cleanup not much different than a bottle.

    Ditto,

    I ran a large CB for years but moved recently and not sure where I packed it. So this weekend I went shopping for a new one and picked up one of these smaller lighter units. I'm going to use it on longer rides and a bottle on shorter runs.

  15. #65
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    ^^^ The seriousness of my ride has little to do with whether or not I need a bunch of gear.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  16. #66
    Sleek Jamis Exile Rider
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    I ride with a camelbak mule. Its prolly too much pack, but its all I have at the moment. Looking to get one of the slimline packs for christmas. I do have a Camelback Chill bottle for my road rides, but not for use on the trails. Where I ride trailwise, it gets really grimy and grody and nasty to drink from. So its the backpack.

  17. #67

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by stygz1 View Post
    ..
    I was browsing the camelbak website and they suggest putting your empty bladder in the freezer so you dont get mold.
    I have been using a camelbak since 1998. I keep them in my fridge with water when not riding or dry them out . I never had mold in my camelbak. I did however throw out the bladder that came in my 1998 camelbak since it leaking at the top. Then again I got many years from that one.

    I had bad experience with tools rubbing a hole in my spare tube in seatpack and after that I moved my tube and tools in my camelbak. My first camelbak was just bladder and simple holder for the bladder. No storage space at all. My next one was mule and it had couple small pockets. My mule is the one from 2002 and it is small and about the size of the current Lobo. This is perfect for most of my rides since I have room for tools, tube, map, clif bar, and even a small sweat rag.

    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  19. #69
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    I am looking at buying the smallest Osprey raptor pack for my short rides because it sucks when your bottle is covered in mud, dirt and/or sand. And sometimes it gets tricky trying to drink on the fly. I always carry a pack on longer rides anyways.

    Its always worth having extra water, I have washed out wounds, come across young kids in the middle of nowhere with absolutely nothing..............

  20. #70
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    Interesting discussion. My 2 cents:

    I switched from bottles to Camelbak because:
    a) reaching for and drinking from bottles is a huge PITA and throws off my riding rhythm.
    b) as mentioned earlier - horse crap
    c) I drink a ton of water when riding. 2 bottles won't suffice for all but the shortest rides.
    d) I actually prefer to have the water weight on my back than on my bike. Probably just psychological.


    For everyone clammering for a non-pack based hydration system, I found this "seat bag" solution at MEC. No idea if it's any good or not, but thought it was interesting. Seems easier to drink from than a bottle/cage. The hose stays attached to your top tube though, extended with a retractable reel. At 900g, seems heavy though...

    Showers Pass VelEau 42 Hydration System - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available


  21. #71
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    As seldom as I use them, there have been some long, hot days in the desert and some long days in the back-country when I was glad to have the extra water and/or gear capacity of one of my hydration packs. That being said, I don't use them for most rides.

    Photo below shows the setup for my 36+ mile / 4 hour ride yesterday in temps around 55F: Tube, CO2, patch kit, zip ties, multi-tool, chain tool, extra CO2 cartridges, chain links, duct tape, etc in the seat bag. Gels, jacket, shoe covers, phone and wallet in my jersey pockets. 2 bottles on the bike and no pack. (It should be noted that the loop had bail out points.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ditched the CamelBak-ridepic.jpg  


  22. #72
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    I use a bottle at Alafia which is setup so you can quickly return to the truck for a refill or repair. At Boyette where it's 2mi of dbl track to hit the first trail and then 6-8 depending on what route to get to the best trail, I use my camelback

  23. #73
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    When I don't wear the cb it feels like I'm not "strapped in" like I didn't put on the 5pt before a race lol.
    And I've found the best way to keep the bladder clean is to just throw it in the freezer.

  24. #74
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    I could not do a full day's ride without my MULE. It is overkill storage-wise for mountain biking but the fit and comfort of it is superb. I can got through a 100oz bladder on a 4.5 hour long cool day. I can go through the 100oz bladder in a little over 2.5 hours on a hot day. I would NOT be able to ride how I do on just 2-3 bottles. I also prefer to have the weight on my body rather than the bike. with the MULE firmly strapped to be it literally feels like part of my body. When I'm carrying bottles and bags on my bike I feel I lose some flick-ability in turns and the bike because slightly more sluggish to bunny hop. I may try bottles again in the future but for now my Camelbak is the only way to go.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2Slo4U View Post
    no need for bungee cords. Specialized makes some clamps that will attach to your seatpost. Works great unless you have a dropper post. Oh, and if your seat post is larger than 31.9 I think your SOL. I used them on a 27.2 seatpost, cut some tubes up to help them fit.
    I looked into this option, but I'm thinking if I have my water bottle on the seat post, where am I putting my small under saddle pouch with my spare tube and tools?

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