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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    I might get some bungee cords and see if I can attach a second bottle to the back of my seat post. Not sure how well it'd work, but it's worth a try.
    no need for bungee cords. Specialized makes some clamps that will attach to your seatpost. Works great unless you have a dropper post. Oh, and if your seat post is larger than 31.9 I think your SOL. I used them on a 27.2 seatpost, cut some tubes up to help them fit.

  2. #27
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    Only use mine if I'm riding more than one 24oz bottle in distance.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  3. #28
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    I bring no water because it weighs too much

  4. #29
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    OK.... My deal, I use a fanny pack. The camel bak is nice when it's 104 out, but other wise I carry my water in the fanny pack with tools, food, and such.

    I've always been told to keep the weight off the bike.

    The fanny back rides low on my hips, hardly know it's there.
    Ride Hard or Ride Home Alone.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by schoolisbad1 View Post
    I bring no water because it weighs too much
    ***************************/8pfulmc[/IMG]
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by motopail View Post
    OK.... My deal, I use a fanny pack. The camel bak is nice when it's 104 out, but other wise I carry my water in the fanny pack with tools, food, and such.

    I've always been told to keep the weight off the bike.

    The fanny back rides low on my hips, hardly know it's there.
    I'd rather have that little extra weight off of my body and on the bike. I, myself, will have to propel all of that weight anyway. I also would rather have that weight sit low than up high. To each his/her own though!

  7. #32
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    I like that my camelback protects my spine. If I go on a short ride I'll often fill up a couple extra water bottles and stick them inside to make the ride feel longer and to make the hills more substantial. I like to bring plenty of tools with me. 2 Spare tubes, spare hanger, spare derailleur, needle nose pliers, assortment of zip ties, extra sealant, cell phone, wallet, keys, toilet paper, rain jacket, arm and leg warmers, multi-tool, full sized 5mm allen for straightening hanger(saved me many times).

    I want to get one of those portable cassette removal tools, as I've definitely had to walk a few miles because my hanger got bent and my chain became mega stuck behind the cassette (thank lob for the pie plate that protected my spokes).

    I'm not into racing as when I've raced I find it makes me think of every ride as a training ride and that leads to me enjoying it less. Much of my work is with developing statistics and new algorithms to estimate them, so ignoring numbers when I'm on the bike is a relief. But if I wanted to go extra fast and efficient, I would try to lose as much of that weight as possible, and if the mileage allowed, I'd abandon my camelback too. But for the regular rides that are 99.999% of my riding, I like to be ready for almost any concievable contingency.

  8. #33
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    What about those with dropper posts? Where else could u store your tools/tube than a camelback?
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaverwins View Post
    What about those with dropper posts? Where else could u store your tools/tube than a camelback?
    They make all sorts of packs you can put on different locations on your bike's frame tubes. I am not saying ditching Camelbaks is always the best for everyone, but for me personally, if I am going under 10 miles in warm weather, I can fit all I need in my pack and my one large 33 oz water bottle. I enjoy the "light" feeling I have without 8 lbs of junk on my upper back. But like I said, to each his/her own. That's the great thing about mountain biking is you do what suits you best.

  10. #35
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    I prefer to run minimal. Only xc race i did, ran a water bottle and no tools and loved it. Just trying to figure out the best method to go that route but keep a tube, super glue, multitool all with me as well.

    Ride solo a lot so ill likely camel then so i have my phone with me.
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  11. #36
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    By ditchng the Camelback for shorter rides you are acutally losing weigh. On average a Camelbak can weigh arounts 6-10 lbs where as a water bottle and seat pack weigh arount 2-3 lbs. On longer rides (time wise) and/or hot days I think carrying a Camelback is essential sometimes with a water bottle as well.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaverwins View Post
    I prefer to run minimal. Only xc race i did, ran a water bottle and no tools and loved it. Just trying to figure out the best method to go that route but keep a tube, super glue, multitool all with me as well.

    Ride solo a lot so ill likely camel then so i have my phone with me.
    No, I hear ya. If you Google 'bike pouches' you will see all sorts of clever bags to put on your bike. In my little seat post bag I am able to fit 1 tube, Co2 pump and cartridge, crank brothers multi-tool, 1 contact lense (just in case i have contact issues) and my cell phone. It was a Walmart special for $15. It's packed tight but does the job.
    This is only when I am riding a shorter ride on trails I know l like the back of my hand. Epic rides get the full CamelBak treatment.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaverwins View Post
    What about those with dropper posts? Where else could u store your tools/tube than a camelback?
    What's a dropper post????


    Don't use one so it is not a problem.























    And yes, I know what a dropper post is.
    I crashed hard enough on my Tallboy to break my leg,
    The carbon is way more durable than most people.

  14. #39
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    Fortunately it rarely gets hot enough around here to make a backpack uncomfortable, pack all the way. The lower center of gravity does make sense but I still prefer the bike to weigh as little as possible.

    Water
    First aid
    Tube
    Patch kit
    Multi tool
    Pump
    Snacks
    Map
    Compass
    Phone
    Camera - if I'm so inclined
    Emergency blanket - depending on ride

    I will be adding zip ties that's a great idea! Maybe some strong tape.

    I should also mention that I to have been happy to have the bag on after a coupe if tumbles.
    Michael

    Ride on!

  15. #40
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    I will never go back to a regular post. Its the biggest mtb part to come out in a long time.
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by geraldooka View Post
    Fortunately it rarely gets hot enough around here to make a backpack uncomfortable, pack all the way. The lower center of gravity does make sense but I still prefer the bike to weigh as little as possible.

    Water
    First aid
    Tube
    Patch kit
    Multi tool
    Pump
    Snacks
    Map
    Compass
    Phone
    Camera - if I'm so inclined
    Emergency blanket - depending on ride

    I will be adding zip ties that's a great idea! Maybe some strong tape.

    I should also mention that I to have been happy to have the bag on after a coupe if tumbles.
    To me the advantage of ditching the CamelBak is more clear in the cold. If I am riding hard in the cold my back gets damp with sweat under my CamelBak (I sweat like Charlie Sheen going a day without some blow). When the harsh wind blows on a wet back, it sucks. I live in Wyoming though so that is probably not a problem for most if you.

  17. #42
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    F it. Im trying this out tomorrow. Post strap is loose and rubs no more than a ziptie or oring on a fork id say.

    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

  18. #43
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    ^Be sure to report back! ^

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    I prefer the convenience of the tube to drink from. Having to steer and pedal is a bit much while reaching below me for a drink. Maybe I'm just not coordinated enough for a drink holder. I do have a cage on the road bike however.
    Interestingly enough, I'm just the opposite. I ride XC and my breathing rate is always so high that it messes with trying to get enough water out of the tube. It's so much easier for me to gulp down a bunch of water from one big squeeze of the bottle between breaths.

    I'm right handed and I can easily steer with my left and grab the bottle with my right. If I try the opposite hands I fumble for the bottle and feel like I'm going to run off the trail.

  20. #45
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    i ditched the camelback also. I do short rides on a small loop so a water bottle and seatbag are enough for me.

  21. #46
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    I like having a pack but generally do not use a bladder except for longer rides, I hydrate well the day before and at least a couple hours before I leave so a single bottle usually lasts me a short ride.

  22. #47
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    I have gone back and forth over the years. I am actually considering doing a bottle and the gear in the jersey pocket again just to feel that "freedom" of not having the weight on your back. But honestly, you can't beat the drink-on-demand ability of a hydration pack. I also like the minimalist look of straps that you just strap the tube etc. to your seat/seatpost with.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 10-06-2012 at 04:08 AM.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  23. #48
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    During summer, if I want to drink something, I don't have much choice but to wear my camelbak. My bottles are for my dog(s). During winter, they eat snow as we go. I use the new LR version so there is no sloshing water as I move.


    Envoyé de mon iPad à l'aide de Tapatalk HD

  24. #49
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    I put a new Elite cage on my bike today and ordered an Awesome Strap. Sometimes its nice to change it up. I do like the feeling of not having something on my back.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  25. #50
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    Weather in the 60s and i rolled with no camelbak. Saddle bag was fine on the drop post. Gonna be running this setup as much as possible while its not tx summer weather
    Scott Genius 910 tricked out as much as I could without getting a divorce

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