Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 53
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: telemike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    431

    A distrubing encounter

    I met an older guy on a really trick new carbon framed bike at the parking lot for the Gateway trail (Mt. Shasta, CA). We talked as riders are wont to do. I asked about other area trails. This gentleman told me about all the trails he rode in the area, many of which are in wilderness areas or are adamantly closed to mtb use. These trails included the PCT from southern Oregon to Lassen Park, and trails in the Caribou and Trinity Alps wildernesses.

    His attitude was one of the trail exists, and I can ride it.

    His cavalier attitude towards the rules that make trails accessible to all types of users disturbed me greatly. There are already so many places in the Grand State of Confusion where mtbs were allowed, but are now banned because of the behavior of "get out of my way" mtb'ers.

    The PCT and the Appalachian trail are the premier long distance hiking trails for the USA. Both trails are old well established hiking trails with international reputations. How about we respect other wilderness users and hike the PCT - leave the bike home.

    At a time when we are trying to convince the northern California national forests that mtbs are valid recreational uses, such poaching alienates the officials and other trail users making progress in access much more difficult.

    Now, if we could only educate our land managers about the basic incompatibility of horses and dirt bikes with self-propelled recreation, our trails would improve immensely.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 11053's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,158
    You lost me after you squandered the opportunity to engage him in a carbon vs aluminum discussion.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: telemike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    431
    Carbon for road, aluminum for trails. Carbon is allergic to impacts!

    Alas, I still ride steel on the road!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,657

    A distrubing encounter

    Nice defeatist attitude. Keep giving the anti-mtn biking crowd an inch and eventually we will all be road riding. The hikers and equestrians need to get used to seeing us. Mtn bikes are not going away from those trails.
    If we are not supposed to ride bikes on the PCT, then why did they name it The Perfect Cycling Trail?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  5. #5
    I like pie.
    Reputation: Mr5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    574
    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    Nice defeatist attitude. Keep giving the anti-mtn biking crowd an inch and eventually we will all be road riding. The hikers and equestrians need to get used to seeing us. Mtn bikes are not going away from those trails.
    If we are not supposed to ride bikes on the PCT, then why did they name it The Perfect Cycling Trail?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    As someone who lives where the Pacific Crest Trail exists, I disagree.

    We have a 1000 trails and dirt roads where one can ride in the local NF, yes! Trails in Wilderness are off limits to bikes. A 1000 trails is not enough for your greedy ass? So what's the big deal? And quite frankly 98% of wilderness trails suck, unless your idea of a good time is to ride 10 feet, stop carry bike, ride 15 feet carry bike and so on.

    I really don't want some LA Yahoo yelling on yer left as he scares the sh!t out of my wife on the PCT. It's about relaxing and spacing out on the glory of creation. Bikes actually-Actually would and could ruin the experience.

    This from a MTN biker. Respect users. Simple as that. All users.

  6. #6
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2,416
    Fixed part of the OP..

    Quote Originally Posted by telemike View Post
    His cavalier attitude towards the rules that make trails accessible to all types of users disturbed me greatly. There are already so many places in the Grand State of Confusion where mtbs are allowed, but will get banned because of the behavior of "STRAVA!" yelling biatches.

  7. #7
    Daniel the Dog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,736
    Guys talk crap at the trail head. I do an annual night ride on some local closed trails here in the NW. I only do it late at night and it doesn't hurt a thing...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: borabora's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    Guys talk crap at the trail head. I do an annual night ride on some local closed trails here in the NW. I only do it late at night and it doesn't hurt a thing...
    It may not hurt the environment, hikers or equestrians. But it can hurt the mountain biking community. Poaching is ammunition for the anti-mountain-biking voice.
    I would like to see more trails opened to mountain biking. Any poaching or voicing off in support of poaching is detrimental to that cause. That's just the way things are whether you like it or not.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,657

    A distrubing encounter

    Not poaching is not getting us access to trails any faster. The sooner we become a common sight on the trails, the better. Eventually the other user groups will get used to seeing us.

    Remember that the PCT was designed and built with one of the purposes being bicycle traffic. Sure it wasn't mtn biking as we know it to be, but bikes were part of the original intent.
    As as I am concerned, bikes are still legal on the PCT. The order from the National Forest Service banning bikes was improperly drafted and signed. It is invalid and will not stand up in court if properly challenged.
    The idea that the PCT is some sacred long distance hiking trail that should never see mtn bike traffic is asinine.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  10. #10
    The White Jeff W
    Reputation: jeffw-13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,285
    Personally I have no problem with some trails being closed to MTB so that hikers and horses can enjoy the outdoors without being run over by some mtb'er amped up on GU and Strava.

    As long as its not my trails
    No moss...

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    506
    Bikers must respect hikers/horse people and vice versa. Where I ride there are horses present. I ALWAYS dismount and slowly walk toward horse or let them approach me. Common sense. We, as bikers do not own the traiul. There is lots of room for all of us so be respectful of others.

    I have never been given an attitude by a horseback rider or hiker.

    Sadly I have witnessed bikers giving shit to horseback riders. Just blastingby the horse and rider.

    Nice way to get somebody seriously hurt. 1,000 pound horse is a lot to handle when they are spooked by a bike.

    As Rodney King so eloquently stated "Can't we all just along?"

  12. #12
    High Desert MTBer
    Reputation: rockerc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    4,850
    Quote Originally Posted by drjay9051 View Post
    Bikers must respect hikers/horse people and vice versa. Where I ride there are horses present. I ALWAYS dismount and slowly walk toward horse or let them approach me. Common sense. We, as bikers do not own the traiul. There is lots of room for all of us so be respectful of others.

    I have never been given an attitude by a horseback rider or hiker.

    Sadly I have witnessed bikers giving shit to horseback riders. Just blastingby the horse and rider.

    Nice way to get somebody seriously hurt. 1,000 pound horse is a lot to handle when they are spooked by a bike.

    As Rodney King so eloquently stated "Can't we all just along?"
    This... even when horse riders tell me it's OK to ride by, I will still dismount as I feel better safe than sorry. It ain't no big deal for me, and makes for a better day all round! If, on the other hand, I was all 'amped up on Gu and Strava', it might be a different story... (BTW, where do I get this Strava? My dealer says he's never heard of it?)
    It's all Here. Now.

  13. #13
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,739
    My question is this. If they are allowed to hike on our MTB trails, then why can't we ride on their hiking trails?
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: donutnational's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    289
    I got my first Mt. bike in 1982 and rode in Yosemite and the John Muir Wilderness with nothing but positive reactions from hikers for a few years until it was formally banned. Since that time I've been hearing the argument that waiting and advocating was the only reasonable course of action. Well, if I continue waiting maybe I'll be allowed to ride my wheelchair in the wilderness on a few select rails if I live to be 100. Instead I chose to pick my trails and my times carefully and continue to ride in banned areas while I am still able.

  15. #15
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Due to the numbers of eco-terrorists and anti mountain bikers that read these forums if you choose to poach trails please keep it to yourselves rather than post about it and give them yet more ammunition in their efforts to ban us from every piece of dirt. TIA.

  16. #16
    Trailhead Poseur
    Reputation: jjaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    504
    And I opened this thread expecting to read that you came across a naked hiker or something.

  17. #17
    007
    007 is offline
    b a n n e d
    Reputation: 007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty $anchez View Post
    Due to the numbers of eco-terrorists and anti mountain bikers that read these forums if you choose to poach trails please keep it to yourselves rather than post about it and give them yet more ammunition in their efforts to ban us from every piece of dirt. TIA.
    This.

    And if you want to get involved, go here: Sharing the Pacific Crest TrailHome » Sharing the Pacific Crest Trail

    check out this thread: Big news: Feds to consider allowing bikes on PCT

    and "like" the FB page (linked through the first site)
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,657

    A distrubing encounter

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty $anchez View Post
    Due to the numbers of eco-terrorists and anti mountain bikers that read these forums if you choose to poach trails please keep it to yourselves rather than post about it and give them yet more ammunition in their efforts to ban us from every piece of dirt. TIA.
    I don't get how this argument works. The land managers already know people are poaching the trails. They don't need posts on MTBR to know that. Few posts on MTBR are not going to change any bodies attitudes.
    If anything, a bunch of people standing up and saying "yes, I ride that trail" combined with zero trail conflict incidents, shows why the trails should be legalized.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  19. #19
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
    As someone who lives where the Pacific Crest Trail exists, I disagree.

    We have a 1000 trails and dirt roads where one can ride in the local NF, yes! Trails in Wilderness are off limits to bikes. A 1000 trails is not enough for your greedy ass? So what's the big deal? And quite frankly 98% of wilderness trails suck, unless your idea of a good time is to ride 10 feet, stop carry bike, ride 15 feet carry bike and so on.

    I really don't want some LA Yahoo yelling on yer left as he scares the sh!t out of my wife on the PCT. It's about relaxing and spacing out on the glory of creation. Bikes actually-Actually would and could ruin the experience.

    This from a MTN biker. Respect users. Simple as that. All users.
    I agree. With all the options available, the only reason a person decides he MUST ride the PCT is because someone asked him not to. Like it or not, here's how its going to appear to the BLM if riders are caught in numbers on the PCT:

    1. we dedicated trails for multi-use (mtb) and we asked bikers to stay off the PCT and reserve that for pedestrians
    2. you thumb your nose at us and ride the PCT anyway and now my day sucks because I have to deal with complaints from pedestrians
    3. we don't have money to patrol, so we'll enact harsher penalties to discourage bikes on the PCT. And since you can't cooperate and made my life miserable, we'll be more inclined to shut down mtb access at the slightest sign of trouble in the future.

    what you guys need to understand is this is their WORK. we aren't two sides rallying for the same shared passion. these guys are at work, doing a job. no one likes anyone that makes their job harder. if you think you'll overpower them with your will to right all the wrongs you are sadly mistaken. make their lives easier and you'll get a lot more cooperation.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    273
    trails meant for hiking/walking I agree, Are more relaxing and if bikes aren't allowed then they shouldn't be poached, it does give the anti,mtb crowd ammo. Now in my area we have waterworks and powerline "firetrails/dirt roads" thats marked completedly off limits to anything. No trespass at all. I poach those all the time, Have been for 20 years and never gotten in trouble.
    1993 Trek Multitrack 700
    2011 Trek Hifi Plus
    2013 WalGoose

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    12
    I'm was actually trying to find out if anyone else shares my passion of off-highway cross-country bike packing. I recently had the desire to thru-bike the PCT, only to find out that bikes are prohibited from use on the PCT! I want to create a trail specifically for us but before I can do anything I need to know how much demand there is for such a trail. Who else would like to see a trail dedicated to mountain bikers that stretches from the Washington-Canada border to the California-Mexico border.

    Thoughts?

  22. #22
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    Nice defeatist attitude. Keep giving the anti-mtn biking crowd an inch and eventually we will all be road riding. The hikers and equestrians need to get used to seeing us. Mtn bikes are not going away from those trails.
    If we are not supposed to ride bikes on the PCT, then why did they name it The Perfect Cycling Trail?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    And as somebody who used to live near the PCT and currently near the Appalachian trail I will also disagree.

    Besides the mentioned fact about it being relaxing for hikers and having somebody yell "on your left" as they buzz by you is not relaxing. There is also an issue of sustainability if you open them up to mountain bikers.

    The PCT is about 2,600 mi long and the Appalachian trail is about 2,200 mi long.
    It would take massive amounts of reworking and maintenance that would be needed to allow mountain bikes.

    When it comes down to it, how would you like it if they started allowing motorbikes on your favorite trails or if they started poaching them disturbing your peace and destroying the trails. I am guessing most of us would be pretty pissed. So why can't we just leave some things the way they are intended to be?
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    16
    I don't have any particular desire to see a trail dedicated exclusively to mountain bikers, especially one that would likely require significant and ongoing public resources to build, manage and maintain - just like the PCT. Keeping other users off would seem as unfair and unnecessary as the current rule that keeps bikes off the PCT. A new trail just seems totally unnecessary since we already built the PCT. From the perspectives of fairness, environmental impact and financial sustainability, I think time would be much better spent trying to figure out how to share the trail we already have.

  24. #24
    dwt
    dwt is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    A distrubing encounter

    Thought is was interesting that OP's encounter was with an "old guy". The stereotype "bad" biker is a mtn dew swiggin' young guy on a DH rig blasting thru multi use XC level trails with no concern for anybody, whether other bikers, hikers or equestrians.

    Where I live, old guys (which I am) are the ones who maintain the trails, are respectful to a fault of other users, and wouldn't be caught dead poaching on gov't owned banned trails out of fear of blowback in the form of getting bikes banned from the dwindling number of trails they now are permitted on.

    Though I have been known to trespass on private property, ready to bail if the actual owner shows up, and figuring that getting arrested is the risk I, hikers, dirt bikers and 4 wheelers are willing to take on these lands, where "everybody" is a poacher.



    Posted via Tapatalk on iPhone.

    "Old enough to know better and also old enough not to care. Best age to be."
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,047
    I am always amazed at the difference between California and Colorado in this regard. In Colorado there are very few trails that are off limits to bikes. You can ride most of the Colorado Trail with the exception of the parts that go through wilderness areas. If even Marin County can't have any decent legal singletrack (besides Tamarancho which is very small and owned by the Boyscouts) then what hope is there in the rest of the state? Hell, we (Bay Area mountain bikers) even have to put up with radar guns enforcing 15mph hour speed limits! At this point, I say California is a lost cause and it makes no difference whether you respect the rules or not.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,657
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    The PCT is about 2,600 mi long and the Appalachian trail is about 2,200 mi long.
    It would take massive amounts of reworking and maintenance that would be needed to allow mountain bikes.
    Open the PCT and stand back. The mtn bike community is ready to provide thousands of man-hours of volunteer labor the maintain and repair the trails. The PCT has existing maintenance issues that are well known. Many sections are so overgrown that the trail becomes lost. Some sections are erroded and washed out. Mtn bikers will happily work to resolve these issues.

    When it comes down to it, how would you like it if they started allowing motorbikes on your favorite trails or if they started poaching them disturbing your peace and destroying the trails. I am guessing most of us would be pretty pissed.
    I commonly ride trails that are shared with motorcross bikes. You here them coming from quite a ways off, so there is plenty of warning. All the motorcross riders I have dealt with have been courteous and polite when we pass each other. We don't live in a vacuum. There are others around us that will always affect our lives. Dealing with other trail users is just part of life and it should be expected anytime you are on the trail.

    So why can't we just leave some things the way they are intended to be?
    Thats the thing. The PCT was intended for cycling. Cycling was legal on the PCT until a group of rogue forest service employees illegally wrote an order banning mtn bikes from the PCT.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: telemike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    431
    All is not lost for single track in California. The State Parks often allow mtbs on single track like China Camp. The CalFire demonstration forests not only allow mtbs on single track the single track was designed and built primarily by mountain bikers. The forest also have single track with the amount varying by forest. The shasta trinity forest has trail complexes around redding, weaverville, and is working on more access at Mt. Shasta.

    We need to form lobbying organizations and put our money where our needs are just like the orv folks have.

  28. #28
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,724

    A distrubing encounter

    That would be nice to see. I did my MS fieldwork in the Scott River headwaters and would love to go back and ride some day. It was neat seeing Callahan profiled in Bike a few years ago, as I've spent a lot of time there.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

    Riding in Helena? Everything you need to know, right here.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jugdish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,240
    The first rule of fight club?
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    155
    As far as the AT goes, there really isn't much 'sustainable' about that trail, at least in the northern new england sections. Much of the trail there was built years ago, when they pointed at a mountain top and said "thats where we shall go, straight up" and many of the trails do just this. They would suck majorly to ride a mtb on. They are also prone to serious erosion and regular damage. That said, this is part of what gives that trail its character and makes it enjoyable to hike. Still--I will stand by my argument that a well designed MTB trail is ideal for all users.

  31. #31
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,391
    I see being barred from a few select trails for hikers to be a small price to pay for dirt bikes and ATV's being kept off of most of the trails I ride.

    I lived right ON the PCT for a few years (it went across our driveway), and I've lived many places on the east coast where the AT runs nearby. Never found the need to ride either, though I must confess that I did end up on the PCT once when I got lost.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  32. #32
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    Open the PCT and stand back. The mtn bike community is ready to provide thousands of man-hours of volunteer labor the maintain and repair the trails. The PCT has existing maintenance issues that are well known. Many sections are so overgrown that the trail becomes lost. Some sections are erroded and washed out. Mtn bikers will happily work to resolve these issues.
    I am sure there are plenty willing to volunteer.

    So the answer would be to start on those over grown unmaintained sections and seeing if you can get them opened up to mountain bikers if you maintain them.

    Just poaching isn't the answer and that is what pissed people off, gives them a bad impression of mountain bikers and makes them lobby against them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post

    I commonly ride trails that are shared with motorcross bikes. You here them coming from quite a ways off, so there is plenty of warning. All the motorcross riders I have dealt with have been courteous and polite when we pass each other. We don't live in a vacuum. There are others around us that will always affect our lives. Dealing with other trail users is just part of life and it should be expected anytime you are on the trail.
    There is a difference when that is what the land owners want. You knowingly go there expecting motorbikes, not to get away from the noises of the world.

    Also unlike a motorbike, there is no warning from us. I try to give polite reasonable warning and still occasionally see people jump.

    My area has hike only trails, equestrian only trails, OHV trails and I have even been on mountain bike only trails. The difference is those trails that are mountain bike only I never hear any other group screaming for access but for some reason mountain bikers have this weird sense of entitlement to all trails.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    Thats the thing. The PCT was intended for cycling. Cycling was legal on the PCT until a group of rogue forest service employees illegally wrote an order banning mtn bikes from the PCT.
    I am not sure where you got your history lesson on that.
    Originally the PCT might have allowed cycling but intended for cycling?
    I can't find any information supporting you claims maybe you can help me.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  33. #33
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I see being barred from a few select trails for hikers to be a small price to pay for dirt bikes and ATV's being kept off of most of the trails I ride.
    Exactly
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  34. #34
    High Desert MTBer
    Reputation: rockerc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    4,850
    I gotta ideah! How about allowing bikes on these long distance trails as long as they are going LONG DISTANCES and can somehow prove it? keep usage more minimal, and keep the weekend warrior riders off of it...
    It's all Here. Now.

  35. #35
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    I gotta ideah! How about allowing bikes on these long distance trails as long as they are going LONG DISTANCES and can somehow prove it? keep usage more minimal, and keep the weekend warrior riders off of it...
    Not that I think it is a bad idea but what would be considered a long distance? Also how would you propose proving that you are there for that long distance?

    Sure, you could assume the guy loaded up with gear is there for the long haul.
    But then there are hardcore guys who go out in the wilderness with almost nothing.

    Then of course the unfortunate which would be increased poaching and and of course the "weekend warrior" crying how unfair it is that this biker can use it but this one can't.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  36. #36
    High Desert MTBer
    Reputation: rockerc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    4,850
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Not that I think it is a bad idea but what would be considered a long distance? Also how would you propose proving that you are there for that long distance?

    Sure, you could assume the guy loaded up with gear is there for the long haul.
    But then there are hardcore guys who go out in the wilderness with almost nothing.

    Then of course the unfortunate which would be increased poaching and and of course the "weekend warrior" crying how unfair it is that this biker can use it but this one can't.
    I don't know why poaching would increase, would this make people want to poach it more? I wonder... Also, people are already crying 'unfair' so no change there, except it might lessen the number of people doing that. Just throwing some ideas out here: Maybe rent FS or whatever GPS units to users? Proceeds to support the system? Maybe sell trail licenses for specific usage, proceeds again to upkeep etc. They do it in the Grand Canyon for river trips... For me the attraction of such a trail would be for long distance usage, an epic journey of sorts. Just what constitutes such an epic would have to be discussed further and decided.
    It's all Here. Now.

  37. #37
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    I don't know why poaching would increase, would this make people want to poach it more? I wonder...
    Without a system in play to prevent it, I see people with the attitude of "if they can do it, I should be able to and nobody will stop me". We already have that attitude when no cyclist are allowed.

    I totally agree, the only attraction to riding a trail like the PCT or AT would be to do it for the long haul. Other than that, I would have no interest in it.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  38. #38
    High Desert MTBer
    Reputation: rockerc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    4,850
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Without a system in play to prevent it, I see people with the attitude of "if they can do it, I should be able to and nobody will stop me". We already have that attitude when no cyclist are allowed.
    ARMED VIGILANTE HIKERS!!! Wait... I think we have them already...
    It's all Here. Now.

  39. #39
    007
    007 is offline
    b a n n e d
    Reputation: 007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,018
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    I am not sure where you got your history lesson on that.
    Originally the PCT might have allowed cycling but intended for cycling?
    I can't find any information supporting you claims maybe you can help me.
    The PCT was not intended for cycling per se, however, it WAS intended as a multiuse trail with bicycles specifically included as part of the National Trails System Act. The part about the USFS writing an order banning bikes from the PCT is in fact correct. The legality of that stop-order is certainly questionable. You can read more here: Sharing the Pacific Crest TrailHome » Sharing the Pacific Crest Trail

    Go to the history page in particular . . . you'll be able to see all the doc's there, including the original closure order.
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  40. #40
    007
    007 is offline
    b a n n e d
    Reputation: 007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,018
    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    I gotta ideah! How about allowing bikes on these long distance trails as long as they are going LONG DISTANCES and can somehow prove it? keep usage more minimal, and keep the weekend warrior riders off of it...
    This is actually not a bad idea . . . however, how do you define and prove (as you note) "long distance?" The other issue is that with a lot of the trail passing through wilderness, "distance" in the eyes of a thru-hiker, may not be possible.
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  41. #41
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by 007 View Post
    The PCT was not intended for cycling per se, however, it WAS intended as a multiuse trail with bicycles specifically included as part of the National Trails System Act. The part about the USFS writing an order banning bikes from the PCT is in fact correct. The legality of that stop-order is certainly questionable. You can read more here: Sharing the Pacific Crest TrailHome » Sharing the Pacific Crest Trail

    Go to the history page in particular . . . you'll be able to see all the doc's there, including the original closure order.
    I am aware as it's intent as a "multiuse" trail but was questioning that it was "intended" for bikes". Of course in 100 years cycling has change immensely. It went from the occasional cyclist putting along at probably a few miles per hour and probably as a means of transportation to the recreational user getting to the trail via automobile and bombing down it at speeds of 30+ miles per hour.

    Not that I always agree with it, but rules/laws do change for various reasons and understandably so.

    As far as far as the legality of the stop order, get enough people together to challenge it. Which appears to be getting done. Of course as we all know poaching tends to be counter productive and a few poachers can ruin it for the masses.

    Still not sure how I feel about opening some of these trails to mountain bikers as a whole but I do think allowing bike packing on it would be awesome though.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  42. #42
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    ARMED VIGILANTE HIKERS!!! Wait... I think we have them already...
    LOL, there are a lot of crazies out there.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    15
    I'll start this off by saying, "at least bikes don't leave big piles of poop that attract stinging insects...."

    I'm a triple crown thruhiker who rides.

    I think the biggest concern should be overuse. I've seen first hand the impacts of overuse by hikers (litter, excessive fire rings, cutting switchbacks). By horsemen (abandoned caches-steel drums+ gear, large camp impacts, nails in every other tree for tarps). As for bikes, well I never saw a mtb on the AT, PCT or the CDT. We did see some thrubikers on double track on the CDT.

    As for armed hikers, I only know of one who carries.....

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    236

    A distrubing encounter

    I love when trails are closed to bikes. Adds to the excitement when I ride them.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,949
    I live near the PCT, within 2 miles, we ride it a lot during the off season, Mid September-April. During those times if we do have an encounter with a hiker( very rare) we respect them being there and yield. We also respect the trail and do not skid or ride reckless. We also do trail work on occasion such as removing falling trees and debris.
    The whole PCT closure is a bunch of crap, it was open for bikes until 1988, when it wrongfully closed with no public imput or debate. There is a movement to legally re-open it because of the illegal closure. A fact about the PCT and bikes, not one ticket has ever been issued, or any other disciplinary action has to a someone riding on the PCT.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,708
    Man, don't you just hate other people?...

  47. #47
    dwt
    dwt is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    A distrubing encounter

    "I love Humanity but I hate humans"

    - Albert Einstein

    Nailed it again.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    319
    What age do you consider old? I want to know so I can figure out if it's age discrimination. Or maybe it's carbon discrimination?

  49. #49
    dwt
    dwt is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    A distrubing encounter

    Quote Originally Posted by NotQuiteClimbing View Post
    What age do you consider old? I want to know so I can figure out if it's age discrimination. Or maybe it's carbon discrimination?
    I felt great and stayed in good shape throughout my 30's, 40's & 50's. When I hit 60, things started to fall apart. Mother Nature, genetics, and all the bad stuff I did to my body in my 20's started to take a toll finally. Serious health issues, Dr.'s, hospitals, operations, medications, physical therapy and all that. Brain damage caused by surgery to remove benign brain tumor messed up the left side of my body, partial paralysis, balance really messed up. My normal sports diminished: mt biking , skiing particularly, though road bike OK. Approx a year of comparative inactivity put 30 pounds on my body . After. 30 years of wearing same sized pants , had to get new
    ones with bigger waist. Weight harder to lose at this age. So the answer is 60.

    "50 might be the new 40, but 60 is the
    old 60 "
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    232
    Equestrians should have the least rights to trails. First off they're a very small number. Second they cause tremendous trail damage. Except ATV's. They should have no rights at all.

    Recently I was taking a break and setting up my Gopro when this horseback rider comes around the bend and the horse freaks out. Mind you, I'm off the bike sitting on a log. The rider manages barely to get the horse under control and says "you scared him!". I was sitting down. These horse people are freaking crazy. If their horse can't deal with a human sitting down then they shouldn't be riding them on a trail.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What's the scariest encounter with an animal you have had?
    By Trail Addict in forum California - Socal
    Replies: 157
    Last Post: 03-18-2014, 08:26 AM
  2. Aggressive Dog Encounter
    By PickeringMTB in forum Eastern Canada
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 01-22-2013, 08:26 PM
  3. Hiker encounter
    By Spinning Lizard in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-14-2012, 05:24 PM
  4. Police Encounter at the Shed
    By washedup in forum Virginia, WV, Maryland, DC, Delaware
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-05-2012, 04:32 PM
  5. Bear & Skunk Encounter
    By motobutane in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-02-2011, 06:50 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •