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  1. #1
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    Cost justification of motor vs. pedal

    So, I find it interesting and perplexing as to how a mtb can go for 7 grand (carbon, xtr, etc..) and I can go down to my local KTM, Honda, Yami dealer and pick up a 450cc, 230mm travel, fuel injected, titainium valved, head lit, and street legal bike for the same $$$. This post is not meant as a gripe or complaint per say, but rather a what, why, and how come. I get that motorbike companies have pretty deep pockets but so does Trek and Specialized. So what gives? Race team support is far greater in the motor world so theoretically the motorbikes should cost more if that is a reason. I get that carbon is pricy but so is fuel injection, titainium valves, muffs and.....a motor. How is it that we as bikers accept this as equal. The suspension on motorbikes is on par with mtb's or even better in some cases. The majority of motorbikes are built in Japan and mtb's in Taiwan. So what gives? I can understand why a small mtb company might need to charge more but the big guys should be held to an explanation. Would someone on the inside post a cost breakdown of R&D through showroom floor of motor vs. pedal bikes to help me (and others) to understand why this is so. Or does the answer to this question just go into a secret vault hidden at Trek's version of area 51.
    "Speed focuses the mind. It cuts through the fog of drab everyday living and keeps us on our toes."

  2. #2
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    I would like to know this to.

  3. #3
    Sweep the leg!
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    What you're failing to understand is if a guy like you buys that KTM, takes it down to the track, fills out the contingency paperwork to get money from the manufacturer of your sprockets, bars, tires, oil, fuel, helmet... you still have to place in the race. Then, if you're consistently placing you might pick up a sponsor or two. After a while of that you might be talented enough to get noticed by a factory team and be covered for everything.

    It's the other way around for that Trek. Most of those $12,000 Treks being raced are under the guys on the factory team. Those riders raced for a few years on "inferior" equipment before a sponsor started anding them the latest technology.

    Most of the bikes being sold at the LBS and that's a number around 99.9%, will be lucky if a Category 2 rider races them. The Cat 1's have been getting sponsor support for a while as do the Pros. At least the ones who have their chit together do.

    Oh, and if you're thinking you can buy any moto off the showroom floor and be competitive against the true Pros, you're high. They've easily spent 10 times as much on the bike as you have, if not more. While most of racing is talent, factory backing is the last bit of the climb that racers need to stay in the top level. Otherwise you'd see more privateers winning.

    In the world of Pro Off-Road Cycling, there are few privateers. There are none in Pro Road Cycling.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  4. #4
    AZ
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  5. #5
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    You've also have to think about weight. Everything on a bike maybe just as good as on a motorcycle, but it has to be a lot lighter and lighter costs $$$$

  6. #6
    Hic-A-Doo-La!
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    Yes.

  7. #7
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    Caff Pwrd I get what your saying. I guess I'm coming at this from more of an engineering standpoint. We're talking billet alum, titainium, small mechanical pieces (hundreds more on a moto), plastic and rubber. B-ball 55 it's not as if the motos don't care about weight savings. Lighter and stronger is the key to success in motor sport. Caff Pwrd I've ridden both motos and pedals for several years, somewhat competitively even. Thats why I'm having some difficulty seeing the justification. So roadies are making my mtn bike so expensive? Bah. Whatev. I guess since the snow has melted off the roads I'll go take my sport bike for hot lap through the canyon and forget this nonsense. Good day gelntlemen.
    "Speed focuses the mind. It cuts through the fog of drab everyday living and keeps us on our toes."

  8. #8
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    I too have pondered the OP's question a bit, especially now that I find myself owning an $8000 mtb. But I think there's a bit of apples to oranges in the comparison given. I'd say the $8000 KTM straight of the showroom floor compares better to a good $2500 entry-level FS mtb off the floor of the LBS. As mtb's go, an $8000 carbon fiber, xtr, etc bike would be more comparable to a modified high perf KTM with lots of aftermarket goodies - going for far more than $8000.

  9. #9
    rzip
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    I agree with the original premis, we are getting hosed. A few years ago I visited the Harley factory and at the time you could get a bare bones sportster for about 9K. At the time I also compared it to a bike which weighs say 20 pounds versus the motorcycle. I attribute it to the economies of mass production. 10,000 exhaust valves are going to come in cheap. How many MTB do they sell per year at 5k compared to the number of motorcycles at a comparable price. Anyone know?

  10. #10
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    It has been covered in the past, but it isn't fair to compare a high level mountain bike to an entry level dirt bike. We used to provide a dedicated ambulance to a local motocross sponsor. Even among weekend warriors, very few people were riding stock bikes on the track. After-market suspension was probably the most common upgrade and does not come cheap.

  11. #11
    Five is right out
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post

    ....
    Plus this to beat it with


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