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Thread: Breathing...!?

  1. #1
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    Breathing...!?

    How much of an emphasis do you place on breathing?

    Personally, I'd never really given it a second thought ^^

    I ride & I breath, right...??

    Today I viewed a Youtubers edit & he was getting fitness tested etc

    The guy who tested him, talked about breathing technique.

    Although he didn't go into it... it got me thinking about my breathing, particularly on sustained climbs.

    During tonights ride, I was slogging away as usual on the first leg of climbing. During the second leg, I made a conscious effort to breath more deeply... or as the testing guru put it, getting more fuel aka oxygen to the muscle.

    And blow me down!! My Lamaze class impression had me feeling less fatigued!? Both, during & post ride.

    It may sound like I'm dying to my riding budz, but it definitely feels more like I'm finally living!

    Who knew breathing was so important?

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    How much of an emphasis do you place on breathing?
    Quite a lot. A friend of mine tried not breathing, he doesn't ride anymore. In fact he doesn't do much...

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    This is gonna be an awesome thread.

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    Push! Push!
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Quite a lot. A friend of mine tried not breathing, he doesn't ride anymore. In fact he doesn't do much...
    Is he still living?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk

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    Last year, I started "pressure breathing", which is a popular breathing technique for high altitude climbers (it's also mechanically induced in fighter type aircraft above 35,000' in the case of a loss of cabin pressure). Almost all of my riding starts at about 7000' and goes to about 10,000'. On these long climbs, exhaling through pursed lips increases the pressure slightly in my lungs....the theory being that this helps O2 cross the membrane. It seems to have contributed to faster climbs. Part of that may be that in order to do this, you have to breath deeply, so maybe that's it. At any rate, it has helped.

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    Focused breathing is hugely important if racing or performance are your thing. Proper breathing techniques can even affect heart rate by lowering it, which of course means more sustainable output.

    Part of this is of course just fitness based. No real way to keep from gasping for air if you are out of shape.

    Surest way to stop a triathlete from drowning is to take your foot off his/her shoulder. See even the self proclaimed superior race of tri folk need to breath.
    he smelt of triflow, had a nice smile, with kind eyes... so I married him

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaloKera View Post
    Is he still living?
    No, dead. Not breathing can do that to you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Quite a lot. A friend of mine tried not breathing, he doesn't ride anymore. In fact he doesn't do much...
    Lol!
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Sometimes in through the nose too. Breathing = good.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Sometimes in through the nose too.
    I like both kinds, both in and out. Breathing only one way is almost as bad as not breathing at all.

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    I'm a seasonal rider and my breathing changes as I get more fit over the course of a season. One thing I've always wondered in observing this is if my diaphragm gets stronger and more flexible/larger as I get more fit. Same with my lungs and changes to my bronchioles /alveoli becoming more efficient. At some point in the season I can take way bigger and more controlled breaths. This seams to correlate with remaining more relaxed in my face and neck. On a side note I've had 2 chest x-rays in my life. Once for getting my tonsils removed and once for broken ribs. Both times the doc said I had the largest lungs they had ever seen. Can't help but wonder if that benefits me in physical pursuits.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    How much of an emphasis do you place on breathing?

    Personally, I'd never really given it a second thought ^^

    I ride & I breath, right...??

    Today I viewed a Youtubers edit & he was getting fitness tested etc

    The guy who tested him, talked about breathing technique.

    Although he didn't go into it... it got me thinking about my breathing, particularly on sustained climbs.

    During tonights ride, I was slogging away as usual on the first leg of climbing. During the second leg, I made a conscious effort to breath more deeply... or as the testing guru put it, getting more fuel aka oxygen to the muscle.

    And blow me down!! My Lamaze class impression had me feeling less fatigued!? Both, during & post ride.

    It may sound like I'm dying to my riding budz, but it definitely feels more like I'm finally living!

    Who knew breathing was so important?

    'Born to ride!'
    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Last year, I started "pressure breathing", which is a popular breathing technique for high altitude climbers (it's also mechanically induced in fighter type aircraft above 35,000' in the case of a loss of cabin pressure). Almost all of my riding starts at about 7000' and goes to about 10,000'. On these long climbs, exhaling through pursed lips increases the pressure slightly in my lungs....the theory being that this helps O2 cross the membrane. It seems to have contributed to faster climbs. Part of that may be that in order to do this, you have to breath deeply, so maybe that's it. At any rate, it has helped.
    Quote Originally Posted by cwtch View Post
    Focused breathing is hugely important if racing or performance are your thing. Proper breathing techniques can even affect heart rate by lowering it, which of course means more sustainable output.

    Part of this is of course just fitness based. No real way to keep from gasping for air if you are out of shape.

    Surest way to stop a triathlete from drowning is to take your foot off his/her shoulder. See even the self proclaimed superior race of tri folk need to breath.
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I'm a seasonal rider and my breathing changes as I get more fit over the course of a season. One thing I've always wondered in observing this is if my diaphragm gets stronger and more flexible/larger as I get more fit. Same with my lungs and changes to my bronchioles /alveoli becoming more efficient. At some point in the season I can take way bigger and more controlled breaths. This seams to correlate with remaining more relaxed in my face and neck. On a side note I've had 2 chest x-rays in my life. Once for getting my tonsils removed and once for broken ribs. Both times the doc said I had the largest lungs they had ever seen. Can't help but wonder if that benefits me in physical pursuits.
    E) All of the above!

    I notice restricted capacity if my stomach is too full.
    I notice increased capacity even in just one ride if I am really working.
    I once had a spontaneous pneumothorax (collapsed lung) - my blood oxygen level was still 100% breathing normally with the reduced lung function. It took 2 x-rays to get the full picture of my lung.

    BTW - When I am working really hard I sound like a steam engine. Breathing through my nose does not provide nearly enough air. I need an unrestricted intake. I've swallowed quite a few insects that way. :-P

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

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    Thanks to those who provided serious replies...

    Mr Pig & his trolls can take a flying %$@#!!

    :flame-dem-trollz:

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    I am going to have to experiment with all of this.

    One thing I do notice is that after a winter of 15 sets of 5 reps of heavy squats every week (heavy for me at least), my leg strength is way up, my gearing is way up, my cadence is way down and my respiratory rate is way down. I am not breathing heavy at all on climbs like I used to. I have been wondering whether it would be of benefit (fitness wise) to drop a few gears, and increase my cadence (even though pedalling at a lower cadence in a higher gear is so much more appealing, exertion-wise).

    In any event, I am going to read up on the breathing techniques mentioned above, and try them on the trail in a lower gear and higher cadence. Until now, I have never given breathing a second thought.

  17. #17
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    - I've used focused breathing techniques since I was a kid and it's most certainly helped me to excel in sports in general........if you wish to get a start in focused breathing, try swimming - it forces you to do this, but after while, it becomes second-nature......
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    I listened to a podcast once with a runner talking about ultra runs and nonsense like that. I'm not sure why I was listening to it, but I was. He was talking about focusing on breathing while he was running to fight fatigue and reduce injury. So I'll give you something else to think about because it's worked for me, in a sense.

    Once you have your breathing down, think about which leg you're extending (downstroke) on your exhale cycle. Believe it or not, you're working that leg harder. If you get a climb and find that leg feeling tired, adjust your breathing so you exhale on the OTHER downstroke. It's like getting a second wind in the middle of a climb.

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    Im not sure what focussed breathing is, even after reading this far.

    What l do know works for me on long climbs is: in through the nose out through the mouth

    Although l will try this exhale change legs technique above, sounds plausible.
    always mad and usually drunk......

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    ... I've had 2 chest x-rays in my life. Both times the doc said I had the largest lungs they had ever seen.
    I was once diagnosed with COPD by my general practitioner because my chest x-ray showed enlarged lungs. Went to a pulmonary doc and he asked me if I exercise and breath really hard and I said yes, I mountain bike. He nodded. That's why your lungs are big, no COPD here. How often do those guys get to give people good news?

    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    ... One thing I've always wondered in observing this is if my diaphragm gets stronger and more flexible/larger as I get more fit.
    Hey, that's not a beer gut, that's my highly developed diaphragm!
    Last edited by Gasp4Air; 05-06-2018 at 01:45 PM.
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    Breathing technique has a noticeable effect of your perceived effort and HR. Taking controlled breaths in through the nose also helps hydrate the air before it reaches your lungs.
    Drinking during hard efforts will interrupt your breathing and I find it best to take a drink while filling my lungs thru my nose and swallow with full lungs. Little things like this matter when your HR is over 180 and you only want to gulp air.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

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    Breathing brings oxygen into the lungs, veins take oxygen rich blood to the heart which delivers it throughout the body via arteries. As capillaries absorb oxygen Co2 is dropped off to be exhaled, when we work hard more Co2 builds up so we have to breath faster, really fast sometimes.

    Anyway when I'm working hard on a bike there's no way I can exchange enough air through my nose and I have no idea how any of you can do it, wide open mouth and breathing for all I'm worth works for me. I have learned to gauge my efforts pretty well by breathing patterns and am interested to see how that perception translates when/if I get a power meter.
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  23. #23
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    Breath is life. Focusing on it really clicks your mind and body into the right state for activity.

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    I ride a LOT. I basically don't get any recovery days. Breathing is never an issue; usually my legs are screaming long before my cardio is taxed. In the rare instances where i haven't been riding and my cardio can match my legs... mostly it's exciting because i feel like a superhero, but also breathing heavily before attacking a feature or sprint is the deciding factor whether i'm successful or not.

    I've definitely noticed that if i want to improve my FTP it's much more effective to do sprints than it is to slog away at my FTP.



    My main riding buddy and i have a similar power:weight. I'm 60lbs heavier and 9" taller. He can smoke me in a sprint, i smoke him in a sustained effort. He's breathing hard and it means nothing, i'm never out of breath even when i'm fresh and pushing hard. I don't know what it means, but it's weird.
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    Rode again, last night... initially I didn't pay my breathing any mind (not second nature yet).

    On my second climb, I decided to focus i.e. breath more deeply & perhaps slowly...

    Funny thing is I was riding next to a riding bud & he was doing it too o_0

    Perhaps he noticed my increased performance+extra noise from our 2 days prior ride?

    On long sustained climbs i.e. 15 mins + I'm noticing benefits from breathing focus.

    Need to think about continuous, real techy, pinch climbs i.e. finished off last nights ride in this manner & I was huffin' in the big ones! >.<

    More focus perhaps?

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    Not so much a problem for me going up as it is going down. I get so focused on things that I forget to really breathe.

    Yesterday's ride, I was on this jump trail and said out loud, "breathe you fool!". I've had to do this many times on steep and sketchy trails.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I get so focused on things that I forget to really breathe.
    Ha ha ha ha.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    I ride a LOT. I basically don't get any recovery days. Breathing is never an issue; usually my legs are screaming long before my cardio is taxed. In the rare instances where i haven't been riding and my cardio can match my legs... mostly it's exciting because i feel like a superhero, but also breathing heavily before attacking a feature or sprint is the deciding factor whether i'm successful or not.

    I've definitely noticed that if i want to improve my FTP it's much more effective to do sprints than it is to slog away at my FTP.



    My main riding buddy and i have a similar power:weight. I'm 60lbs heavier and 9" taller. He can smoke me in a sprint, i smoke him in a sustained effort. He's breathing hard and it means nothing, i'm never out of breath even when i'm fresh and pushing hard. I don't know what it means, but it's weird.
    Hey, delete that hyperventilating trick. I'm barely able to keep up with people who don't know it, and here you go blabbing it all over the internet.

    I've been told by several people, including a published sports physiologist, that your muscles will fail long before your heart and lungs do. I know it doesn't feel that way to everyone - that's your "rev limiter" kicking in - but it's the truth. Your heart and lungs can deliver oxygen and nutrients faster than your muscle tissue can use it, unless you have heart/lung damage or are bonked.

    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    Not so much a problem for me going up as it is going down. I get so focused on things that I forget to really breathe.

    Yesterday's ride, I was on this jump trail and said out loud, "breathe you fool!". I've had to do this many times on steep and sketchy trails.
    ^^^This is for real. Seems ridiculous, but it is soooo real. The first time I realized it was after a long descent that immediately transitioned into a climb - I was dying in the first 50 yds. of the climb and then gradually sped up as I recovered under normal breathing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    How much of an emphasis do you place on breathing?

    ...

    Who knew breathing was so important?

    'Born to ride!'
    I found out about deep breathing while doing the Insanity excercise videos and I have been doing it ever since. Mind you I do not pay attention to it all the time during the ride but when I get on a good climb, the first few yards are dedicated to getting my breathing under control. I actually use my Camelback chest straps as an indicator if I got a "good one" in, I wear them a little loose so if I take a deep breathe and I can feel the straps them I know that was a good one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post

    I've been told by several people, including a published sports physiologist, that your muscles will fail long before your heart and lungs do. I know it doesn't feel that way to everyone - that's your "rev limiter" kicking in - but it's the truth. Your heart and lungs can deliver oxygen and nutrients faster than your muscle tissue can use it, unless you have heart/lung damage or are bonked.

    If that's true then why is epo so effective?
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    If that's true then why is epo so effective?
    I agree it doesn't make sense as pro roadies are always on about who has the largest lung capacity and who can process oxygen fastest and so on... If muscles failed first that would all be nonsense.
    Same as how long one can ride with a really high heart rate or who has a higher red zone. It wouldn't matter if the issue was muscle.

    On many occasions I have run out of air long before my legs cramped or gave up on a climb. Honestly on a climb I have never bonked due to muscle fatigue but for sure from keeping my heart rate up for too long.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwtch View Post
    On many occasions I have run out of air long before my legs cramped or gave up on a climb. Honestly on a climb I have never bonked due to muscle fatigue but for sure from keeping my heart rate up for too long.
    Same. It's running out of air that stops me. I'd wondering if I can increase capacity by breathing through my ass? I think it should be possible as my friends often tell me I can talk out of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Same. It's running out of air that stops me. I'd wondering if I can increase capacity by breathing through my ass? I think it should be possible as my friends often tell me I can talk out of it.
    Let me know if it works. I have been told I have my head up mine on a few occasions so should be able to do the same,
    he smelt of triflow, had a nice smile, with kind eyes... so I married him

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    When I am suffering up a long climb, or any sustained hard effort I definitely try to focus on breathing. I tell myself to be a breathing machine. Efficient deep breaths. I even sort of do a calming sort of thing with the breathing like you might do if you weren't biking. Breath in, breath out, relax...
    Now that I think about it, I do it also when I am in recovery mode, so I focus on breathing and relaxing and try to will myself into a recovered state :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    Hey, delete that hyperventilating trick. I'm barely able to keep up with people who don't know it, and here you go blabbing it all over the internet.

    -F
    I used to be a swimmer when I was a kid, and occasionally we'd try to see how many laps we could do underwater, and I would hyperventilate to try and charge up my blood with full oxygen just before I went, and it helped.
    I could do two laps, plus a turnaround and 5-10 yards for around 55-60 yards
    I never tried this sort of thing cycling though! Definitely going to.

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    I use one of these, and it works, I can breathe much more freely. Takes a little getting used to at first, now I don't even notice it.

    https://www.amazon.com/Rhinomed-Turb.../dp/B00YAOWDWK

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    I never think about breathing except when I'm doing a long ass climb and then I just try to get into a rhythm and breathe deep.
    "You can be clipped in and be boring or ride flats and have a good time." - Sam Hill

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Hey, that's not a beer gut, that's my highly developed diaphragm!
    I need this on a t-shirt.
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    Breathing is my ball and chain. I have adult onset asthma and have diminished lung capacity. I have strong legs on the sprint but cannot sustain long hills. I also crap out on skis at about 9500 ft - that's where I can't move enough oxygen for the energy expended climbing.

    I deal with it much the same as others above. I've also found that it is better to avoid instantly stressing my system. The deficit of oxygen causes lactic acid build up in my muscles and I can't go far at all. By walking the first big hill, I can extend my ride because my lungs seem to stretch as I use them and my respiratory performance improves through the day. Do others have a kind of "warmup" period for their breathing?

    "Stuffing" my lungs also helps and I do it daily (or should). I breathe in as much air as I can then force more in by gulping. Then, I consciously relax all my body and let my lungs expand under the pressure. This helps. Don't do it on the road however. I partially blacked out on I-80 going to Rockville Hills. "Just hold it straight and it'll pass!" Seriously scary.

    The technique of breathing with the lips mostly closed is called "rescue breathing" in the asthma world. It is used to combat close down of the lungs during an asthma attack, especially if one had forgotten one's inhaler! It's a good trick to do on the way to the ER.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by telemike View Post
    "Stuffing" my lungs also helps and I do it daily (or should). I breathe in as much air as I can then force more in by gulping. Then, I consciously relax all my body and let my lungs expand under the pressure. This helps. Don't do it on the road however. I partially blacked out on I-80 going to Rockville Hills. "Just hold it straight and it'll pass!" Seriously scary.
    I learned this technique from watching Hulk Hogan trying to escape an underwater cave or something in the classic 90s speedboat adventure "Thunder in Paradise". You can hold your breath mad long if you stuff your lungs.
    "You can be clipped in and be boring or ride flats and have a good time." - Sam Hill

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    You need to read The Oxygen Advantage by Patrick McKeown. There's a lot of interesting things you can do with breathing --especially while you are not even on the bike --that will help you go faster. What you (OP) describe is actually symptomatic of poor breathing in general, but if it works for you keep doing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlazedHam View Post
    You need to read The Oxygen Advantage by Patrick McKeown. There's a lot of interesting things you can do with breathing --especially while you are not even on the bike --that will help you go faster. What you (OP) describe is actually symptomatic of poor breathing in general, but if it works for you keep doing it.
    First off, that is one kick ass username.

    Second, thanks. I am going to hunt that book down. Interesting that I have been completely oblivious to all of this until now. Looking forward to potentially upping my game, just by breathing differently.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwtch View Post
    Let me know if it works. I have been told I have my head up mine on a few occasions so should be able to do the same,
    I don't think it works that way. I believe breathing would in fact be harder, if your head is up your ass. Could be wrong, I'm not a medical expert or anything.

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    What you do is, take a deep breath, then force gulp more air, THEN stick your head up your ass and exhale in the pressurized environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    What you do is, take a deep breath, then force gulp more air, THEN stick your head up your ass and exhale in the pressurized environment.
    Wow Who knew?
    Yoga class got my mind on breathing long ago and being conscious of your breath is key to performance. Despite decades of this knowledge I (like many others) still hold my breath during techy sections. It amazes me how hard it is to keep on breathing.
    oops I wasn't clipped in

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim c View Post
    It amazes me how hard it is to keep on breathing.
    I don't know what to say to that :0.

  47. #47
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    I once did some breathing exercises for a month to see if it affected my hematocrit percentage. It was extremely unpleasant and had zero effect.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    If that's true then why is epo so effective?
    Maybe they meant that my legs, as a less-than-elite athlete, would fail before my lungs. But it sounded like more of a general statement. I think it's a % thing. Your blood would not naturally carry that much oxygen no matter how you breathed. EPO, I thought, helped your blood carry more oxygen than it normally could.

    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    I used to be a swimmer when I was a kid, and occasionally we'd try to see how many laps we could do underwater, and I would hyperventilate to try and charge up my blood with full oxygen just before I went, and it helped.
    I could do two laps, plus a turnaround and 5-10 yards for around 55-60 yards
    I never tried this sort of thing cycling though! Definitely going to.
    I'm a rather poor swimmer, and I could do that as well. I think it drove my parents crazy because I could stay under water for 2 minutes or more.
    But recently I happened upon an article about "Freediving Blackout" and "Shallow Water Blackout" which made me a little more cautious.
    The hyperventilation thing works great on short climbs. You hyperventilate, then attack the climb in full anaerobic output, and by the time you're at the top your breathing normally. Zero recovery time. Of course, if you're already on the rivet, you can't hyperventilate.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  49. #49
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    Hyperventilation reduces CO2 levels. It does not increase O2 levels or extend the time to passing out.

  50. #50
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    Do you guys breath through your mouth?

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by sito40 View Post
    Do you guys breath through your mouth?

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
    Only as a last resort ...or at FTP or greater. But I've spent some time optimizing power at a pace just under the need to breath through my mouth. Why? Because huffing and puffing makes me slightly dizzy and thus less in control of my bike on technical trails. I have spent considerable time off the bike getting comfortable with low O2 saturation ...like you might experience at altitude. This supposedly reduces the reflex to hyperventilate.

  52. #52
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    Is it better to inhale deeply on a climb?
    Or

    Should I breathe through the mouth?

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

  53. #53
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    If I'm winded I breathe harder. I'm sure that focusing on deep controlled breaths will be more benificial than my method but I don't have the attention span for that. I was born in 1984!

  54. #54
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    So you up-arser's - do you bend over backwards or forwards to get your head in there? :bazzinga:

    In the nose & out the mouth breathing ;-) nasal hairs help catch any wayward bugs o_0

    I'm thinking (dangerous, I know), keeping my breathing ahead of my effort - rather than trying to catch up with my breathing, is the way to go ^^ i.e. get the supply up before the demand hits.

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Quite a lot. A friend of mine tried not breathing, he doesn't ride anymore. In fact he doesn't do much...
    That was really funny. Really funny.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    That was really funny. Really funny.
    Small things...

    Meh.

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  57. #57
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    So to recap:

    Breathing is really good for you.

    Breathing in and out is probably the best method.

    You can breath through your nose and your mouth and some people may be able to breath through their arse as well.

    Some people can forget to breath if they are really busy thinking about something else.

    If you think your breathing might not be good enough you can practice it.

    If you are really struggling to breath you can buy books telling you how to do it but beware of forgetting to breath while reading them. Another good source of information is Hulk Hogan TV shows.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    So to recap:

    Breathing is really good for you.

    Breathing in and out is probably the best method.

    You can breath through your nose and your mouth and some people may be able to breath through their arse as well.

    Some people can forget to breath if they are really busy thinking about something else.

    If you think your breathing might not be good enough you can practice it.

    If you are really struggling to breath you can buy books telling you how to do it but beware of forgetting to breath while reading them. Another good source of information is Hulk Hogan TV shows.
    This should be sticky.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    I once did some breathing exercises for a month to see if it affected my hematocrit percentage. It was extremely unpleasant and had zero effect.
    I don't see how breathing exercises would increase hematocrit. It's not erithropoetic, like increasing certain nutrients.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I don't see how breathing exercises would increase hematocrit. It's not erithropoetic, like increasing certain nutrients.
    Basically, people suffering from sleep apnea were found to have higher hematocrit levels because they spent time at lower oxygen saturation. I theorized that if I voluntarily did this while awake it would have a similar affect.

    Here's one:

    "Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that mean oxygen saturation, RDI, and percent of time spent at oxygen saturation <90% were significant predictors of hematocrit level, even after controlling for gender, ethnicity, 24-h urine NE, BMI, and BP (p<0.05)."

    https://link.springer.com/article/10...325-006-0064-z

  61. #61
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    It looks like my diabetes has severely affected my general circulation, not to mention my age. However, I've taken out my, new to me, bike 3 days this week and I feel so much better. I hope to continue to progress. I was breathing hard even on the short hills. My thighs were on fire. Only 3 miles, but I can already tell the difference. My everyday breathing has gotten much better this week. I sure like to breathe. Please don't take it for granted.

  62. #62
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    ^^^ Keep working at it! Make a plan and a routine to improve.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detectorist View Post
    It looks like my diabetes has severely affected my general circulation, not to mention my age. However, I've taken out my, new to me, bike 3 days this week and I feel so much better. I hope to continue to progress. I was breathing hard even on the short hills. My thighs were on fire. Only 3 miles, but I can already tell the difference. My everyday breathing has gotten much better this week. I sure like to breathe. Please don't take it for granted.
    Besides being good for you in many other ways, it is a great way to help manage diabetes. I have Type 1, and exercise typically increases my insulin sensitivity for 12 to 24 hours after a hard ride. Other types of exercise are great too - being on your feet all day, working around the house, hiking, you name it. If it wears you out, it's good. Keep at it, pay attention to your sugar levels and you'll do well.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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