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Thread: Bike Setup

  1. #1
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    Bike Setup

    Newbie here coming from a lot of road experience. I'm wondering about bike setup. I'm building up a 29 er based off of a diamondback trace frame which some have told me is really more of a hybrid than a 29er mtb frame but lets not bring that into discussion. in a more general basis, what are the different types of setups you see on MTB's in regards to seat height, handlebar height etc. In the road world I have a touring bike where I am very upright and the handle bars are same height as my seat and I'm very stretched out on it. ON my racing bike I have close to a 5" saddle to bar drop, the racing bike feels almost twitchy in regards to cornering while the touring bike feels like a boat making long slow turns around corners.

    What would be considered aggressive for a XC trail type of bike? I've looked at different pics on this forum and sometimes I feel like I see saddles higher than bars and other times it looks like bars are way above the saddle? I know I have to ride and see what also fits my body and such, but I'm just curious. on the road, aerodynamics are paramount in setting up your bike. Doesn't seem like that matters at all off road

  2. #2
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    As you know different setups for different rides. A mountain cross country race bike is set up more like a road race bike with lower bars and quicker handling. A mountain race down hill bike is set up with a higher bar ,shorter stem and a lower seat. How do you define aggressive? As in going fast or riding steeper ,looser with rocks and ruts. No aerodynamics don't matter. You might look at some youtube videos to see what type of bikes are used where.

  3. #3
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    For overall riding, your bar to saddle height should be fairly close to level to offer a overall neutral feel. Thats my take for general riding, but go with what feels best for you. Thats most important.

  4. #4
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    ...or get a dropper seatpost and you can knock yourself out adjusting the seat height. Mine's on the way.....

    -S

  5. #5
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    If you have a fork your starting with that has an uncut steerer tube start out with it like that and swap the spacers around above and below the stem until you find the height you like.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    ...or get a dropper seatpost and you can knock yourself out adjusting the seat height. Mine's on the way.....

    -S
    Quote Originally Posted by ashaw View Post
    If you have a fork your starting with that has an uncut steerer tube start out with it like that and swap the spacers around above and below the stem until you find the height you like.
    These two are good advice. The dropper post lets you set the seat height for maximum leg extension when pedaling hard on fairly flat terrain and then drop the seat for the ability to get better weight positioning on the downhills.

    By leaving the steering tube uncut initially, you can adjust the spacers to make sure the bars are at a height that allows you to keep the front tire weighted on long, seated climbs.

    Stem length / angle is another factor to look at. Length will affect how the steering feels - fast/twitchy (as you go shorter). Angle is similar to the spacers on the steering tube.

  7. #7
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    Yep well versed in steer tube stuff from my road experience. This setup jas already been cut but it looks fine for me. If i keep this frame and just swap forks ill be sure to be careful of that

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  8. #8
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    Your front end will be much higher...saddle level to 2 inches high that handlebar hight. Make it level with the stem facing up them invert the stem. Most bars have flat to 2 inch rise. Stand over much more important! Usually have a lot of seat post exposed. Fork offset is the key to handling within a given fork length. Many fewer hand positions, so bar stem combo very important.

  9. #9
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    Can the db trace take 29er wheel on the rear? From the pic it shows 700c rims. 700c is about the same as 26er putting a fatter 29er tires may not fit and does it has a disc tab? This is my 26er with road wheelset.

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