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  1. #1
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    Bifocals for cycling

    Right now I use two prescriptions one for reading and using the computer etc.And the other for driving, watching TV etc.I use my driving glasses for cycling which work well except I can't read my GPS or use my camera without switching glasses.As I also need some new sun glasses I thought it might be a good idea to combine all three into one pair of bifocal sunglasses. Have any of you tried this and if so how did things work out for you?

  2. #2
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    I wear contacts for driving as well as cycling. I did wear a pair of sunglasses over them which had a bifocal +1 magnifier. Your basic Walmart reading glass if you will. I found they were a pain in the ass on down hills. Reason being my eyes constantly move not just my head. The bifocal would throw me off at times. I stopped wearing them and just stick to my contacts.

  3. #3
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    I have progressive lenses. Once you get used to them, it's no problem, but some people have trouble. I can't imagine bifocals would be worse.

  4. #4
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    I recently had a pair of rudy projects made with bifocals. I've worn progressives but have never worn bifocals. They look kind of weird with the bifocal line but I got used to wearing them within one bike ride. I've priced sport prescription glasses from my optometrist but the price was really high. I went with this mail-order company and the glasses came out perfect for me.

    Prescription Sunglasses, Prescription Eyewear Online | SportRx

  5. #5
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    I am getting to that stage of old where my close-up vision is deteriorating, so I have been using reading glasses for about two or so years. I was looking for a way to combine sunglasses with reading glasses as a bifocal so I only have to haul around one pair. I tried some HD Vision (AS SEEN ON TV!) bifocal reader sunglasses my wife found at a Ross store, and those work okay for sitting on a beach reading a book, but for active stuff I was at a loss.

    I found a maker of bifocal non-prescription inexpensive sport-focused sunglasses at Dual Eyewear Bifocal Sports Sunglasses, All Styles.. I never ordered anything from them, as I looked at those cheap HD Vision glasses a bit closer....

    It turns out they use some sort of stick-on lens to create the bifocal magnifying effect. Hmmmm....gotta be a supplier of little stick-on lenses out there in internetland, I thought to myself....

    Yes, there are several (with varying prices), here are a few:

    www.StickonBifocals.com Optx 20/20 Hydro Tac Reading Lenses $25.00 a pair with FREE Shipping! We are
    TM Technologies - Stick-on Magnifying Lenses
    OPTX STICKON READING LENSES from Aircraft Spruce

    I have not yet ordered any of these, but I plan to.

    In your case, where you are using prescription glasses for everyday viewing, I wonder if you could find a diopter of the stick-on lenses that would work with your glasses to create your own bifocals? If it work it might save some cash, as you would just have to pay the high cost of prescription sunglasses and not the higher cost of prescription bifocal sunglasses.
    "You're messing with my zen thing, man!"

  6. #6
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    I have used Maui Jim sunglasses with bifocals for sailing and reading the GPS and they work great. I think cost around 150.00 on ebay. My wife liked them so much I had to get a pair for her and she uses them on her bike.

  7. #7
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    I've been using bi-focals for 13 years, but didn't start riding with them until this year. The first few years I had trouble even going down stairs while wearing them, so I didn't wear them for any sports or active pursuits. I could read the large digits on my bike computers & didn't really need to see the small print.

    But now my eyes have gotten worse & the bifocal prescription is stronger. I can't even read the large digits & trail-side repairs are difficult (couldn't see the PowerLink to do a chain repair). Fortunately, my brain is more used to bifocals now & I can wear them riding without getting dizzy or loosing sight of the trail. I probably could have started wearing them while riding several years ago, but I didn't need to.

    So if you get bifocals, I recommend you get used to them first before fully commiting yourself to riding with them. I use progressive bifocals, but one of my buddies rides with tri-focals. He doesn't seem to have a problem.
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

  8. #8
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    Thank you everybody for your helpful information' I am going to look into the Rudy Projects and some of the other suggestions made here.

  9. #9
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    If you get progressives to use primarily for riding, talk to the optician about positioning the center "sweet-spot" for distance so it accommodates your typical head position while riding; that is, tilted down. When your head is tilted down you look ahead at the trail through a higher section of the lens than if your head were vertical.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    If you get progressives to use primarily for riding, talk to the optician about positioning the center "sweet-spot" for distance so it accommodates your typical head position while riding; that is, tilted down. When your head is tilted down you look ahead at the trail through a higher section of the lens than if your head were vertical.
    Good advice thank you.

  11. #11
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    I wore progressive lens for years and had no problem with them. Then I had cataract surgery and then just barely needed glasses, but I was far-sighted instead of near-sighted like before. And you definitely need reading glasses once you have had cataract surgery as your eyes can't change focus at all. I have found that now the progressive lenses tend to make me a little nauseous when I ride, but my vision is good enough that I have just been wearing non-prescription sunglasses to ride with and I have to bring my regular glasses in case I have to fix something on my bike.

    I think I am going to get some prescription sunglasses to wear for biking, but I am going to go with regular bifocals instead of progressives. Whatever you get, if it doesn't work the first time you try it on a bike, try it again after you have worn the glasses doing other things.

    I think it is an advantage to not wear prescription glasses when you ride because when your head gets bounced around you also don't have glasses that are moving separately which affects your vision more than just having your eyes being moved.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Welnic View Post
    I wore progressive lens for years and had no problem with them. Then I had cataract surgery and then just barely needed glasses, but I was far-sighted instead of near-sighted like before. And you definitely need reading glasses once you have had cataract surgery as your eyes can't change focus at all. I have found that now the progressive lenses tend to make me a little nauseous when I ride, but my vision is good enough that I have just been wearing non-prescription sunglasses to ride with and I have to bring my regular glasses in case I have to fix something on my bike.

    I think I am going to get some prescription sunglasses to wear for biking, but I am going to go with regular bifocals instead of progressives. Whatever you get, if it doesn't work the first time you try it on a bike, try it again after you have worn the glasses doing other things.

    I think it is an advantage to not wear prescription glasses when you ride because when your head gets bounced around you also don't have glasses that are moving separately which affects your vision more than just having your eyes being moved.
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  13. #13
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    Bifocals for cycling

    Being near and far sighted both, I've
    worn progressives for many years. But mtn biking and also skiing, I wear distance only Rx lenses. Important to be able to clearly see the trail.


    "I ride my bike to ride my bike"- Zen proverb

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ls1geezer View Post
    Right now I use two prescriptions one for reading and using the computer etc.And the other for driving, watching TV etc.I use my driving glasses for cycling which work well except I can't read my GPS or use my camera without switching glasses.As I also need some new sun glasses I thought it might be a good idea to combine all three into one pair of bifocal sunglasses. Have any of you tried this and if so how did things work out for you?
    After wearing contacts for 36 years and dealing with reading glasses the past 10 years.....

    My Eye Doctor suggested I try something I had never heard of - monovision.

    Basically, it is where one of the contacts is for reading and the other eye wears one for distance. Presto - no need for bifocals, reading glasses, prescription sun glasses, etc... .

    It's a good solution for me and I do have options. This is my first year trying monovision. Since I wear the extended wear lenses, I have the option every month to wear two for reading if I will be at the office a lot, two for distance if I will be enjoying the summer and outside a lot (I just wear my reading glasses that month for reading) or the monovision where one eye sees near and the other far.

    There are always comprises with any solution, but I'm finding the monovision to work quite well for me on and off the bike. And with disposable lenses - I have the option of changing to suit my schedule and needs.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    After wearing contacts for 36 years and dealing with reading glasses the past 10 years.....

    My Eye Doctor suggested I try something I had never heard of - monovision.

    Basically, it is where one of the contacts is for reading and the other eye wears one for distance. Presto - no need for bifocals, reading glasses, prescription sun glasses, etc... .

    It's a good solution for me and I do have options. This is my first year trying monovision. Since I wear the extended wear lenses, I have the option every month to wear two for reading if I will be at the office a lot, two for distance if I will be enjoying the summer and outside a lot (I just wear my reading glasses that month for reading) or the monovision where one eye sees near and the other far.

    There are always comprises with any solution, but I'm finding the monovision to work quite well for me on and off the bike. And with disposable lenses - I have the option of changing to suit my schedule and needs.
    When you wear both near and far, do you have to keep the same prescription in each eye - that is one consistently in right, the other left? Or is the accommodation not left-right specific? Just curious.

    EDIT:
    Never mind - I should have followed the monovision link first - think I got my answer.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    When you wear both near and far, do you have to keep the same prescription in each eye - that is one consistently in right, the other left? Or is the accommodation not left-right specific? Just curious.

    EDIT:
    Never mind - I should have followed the monovision link first - think I got my answer.
    Yup - 2 different powers. I always forget which is which in terms of dominant eye and what not - so I mix and match for variety in spite of the suggestion that the dominant eye should be used with the contact power for distance.

    My main benefit or reason for using it is freedom from having to use reading glasses (which I hate).

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  17. #17
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    I've been told Golfer's who wear Eyeglasses stay with single-vision lenses, keeping their eye trained on the length of the Hole at play. There are peripheral blind spots even w/ progressive-type lenses.
    I like Sand - I don't like Witches.

  18. #18
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    Bruce, what are your experiences with depth perception and monovision?

    I found this in the link:
    "Also, although the two eyes still work together as a team in monovision, binocular vision is slightly compromised, which can cause a slight decrease in depth perception."

    I, uh, find depth perception to be very important when racing. How slight a decrease are they talking about?

  19. #19
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by KAriadne View Post
    Bruce, what are your experiences with depth perception and monovision?

    I found this in the link:
    "Also, although the two eyes still work together as a team in monovision, binocular vision is slightly compromised, which can cause a slight decrease in depth perception."

    I, uh, find depth perception to be very important when racing. How slight a decrease are they talking about?
    No problems with depth perception. The only "con" I notice is that when I look far or close - the contact that is not designed for far or close at first reminds me of a foggy, dirty lense (remember those days we had to clean our lenses every night with some tablets to prevent them from getting "cloudy"). So I blink thinking that will clear it, but it doesn't. It's not foggy at all - just the power of the lense making it seem that way.

    I'm used to it now, but in terms of bike racing - no problems as one is never really looking miles down the road like out on the highway, but simply staring at what is in front of you and what is coming up down the singletrack.

    The same when staring at the computer screen, the lense with the power for seeing far makes that eye a tad blurry and the lense seem foggy, so I blink until my eyes adjust to the screen. It's a minor trade off for me, but beats digging around for the reading glasses and I can read all dinner menus at restaurants without needing reading glasses any more.

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