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  1. #1
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    Best Dog for Mountain Biking?

    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  2. #2
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    I've got a Border Collie... he's amazing... if you like a dog that's smarter than you (of course, mine watches Sportscenter and probably knows more about sports than I ever will). They're explosive as puppies... but you have to be careful, because the dog will not stop working until it drops dead.

    Right now my border collie is, I want to say nine, and he's starting to get arthritic... not a big deal, it just means the activity has to be tapered off and less strenuous. Lately I've been taking slow rides along a creekside trail with him just to keep him limber and in shape.

    But collies in general are great, smart, and willing to do some serious running.

  3. #3
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    get a mutt from the pound

    I have a border collie / lab cross that can run all day - just make sure to bring extra water along for the dog and take it a little slower on the downhills.
    Also - you should really save a dog from the pound - there are already too many animals that have to get put down every year and when you buy from breeders it just adds to the problem. On top of that you'll save money if you don't get a purebred AND you'll get a healthier dog.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipedream
    I've got a Border Collie... he's amazing... if you like a dog that's smarter than you (of course, mine watches Sportscenter and probably knows more about sports than I ever will). They're explosive as puppies... but you have to be careful, because the dog will not stop working until it drops dead.

    Right now my border collie is, I want to say nine, and he's starting to get arthritic... not a big deal, it just means the activity has to be tapered off and less strenuous. Lately I've been taking slow rides along a creekside trail with him just to keep him limber and in shape.

    But collies in general are great, smart, and willing to do some serious running.

    This is a bit off topic, have you started to give your dog glucosamine? Google the topic. It's been shown to do wonders for dog's joints.
    * Disclaimer: The author of the above post is not liable for his views and opinions... especially when written under the influence of beer.

  5. #5
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    Labs...

    Quote Originally Posted by crankpuller
    I have a border collie / lab cross that can run all day - just make sure to bring extra water along for the dog and take it a little slower on the downhills.
    Also - you should really save a dog from the pound - there are already too many animals that have to get put down every year and when you buy from breeders it just adds to the problem. On top of that you'll save money if you don't get a purebred AND you'll get a healthier dog.
    I have a chocolate lab that can run for days but they are definitely hyper as pups.

    I agree with crankpuller that you should save a dog from the pound, purebreds from a breeder can end up having a lot of problems as they get older.

    Either way, just make sure you take a lot of extra water....

  6. #6
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    keep them coming

    Thanks for the thoughts. I wouldn't even consider getting a dog from anywhere but the Humane Society. I volunteer there once in a while walking the dogs. And I use a camelback, so plenty of water to go around.

    Anybody with a goldie? There is a nice goldie pup as well as a lab/chow mix that I really like as well.....

    Do you guys ride with your dogs off the leash? How did you train the dog to stay with you?
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...
    I had a border collie too (died at 12 years) and she loved to come riding with me. Very hyper cause even though she would be dead tired the next day she would still get excited if she saw me taking out the bike. I only took her out on easy ride days though and on trails that had alot of ups and down and stream crossings.

    My sister had a pitbull/mutt thing ( I forget what else it had init besides pit) and that dog although clumsier then my border collie liked running along side of us and got used to running beside me and the bike alot easier wise then my dog ever did.

    My dog was pretty well always off the leash too. Only onit when I took her along the streets to the park which was 1 min away and the trailhead was 7 mins away along this bike/running path.

    Watching my dog run down the park hill was funny too, watching her lil legs move so fast trying to keep up with me.

  8. #8
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    Personally, all my pets come directly from breeders,(I don't like supporting puppy farms...). However, you should check out adoption first. I know, practice what I preach,but I show my dog, and I used to show my parrot before he got so old, so I had reasons for going thru a breeder.
    As for what breed of dog, I'm gonna agree again with the previous posts. Border Collie, or Lab. Both of these dogs have ample energy, and are easily trained in obedience. Make sure you start any dog off slow, maybe only 3 or 4 miles until they are more than comfortable with that distance. You don't want to be 4 miles from your car/house/camp, when the dogs legs become too sore and stiff to continue and the mutt just lays down and ignores you,(been there done that). Also you want to give their paws time to toughen up, watchin a dog try to walk with blisters is fairly pitiful. Make sure to bring plenty of extra water, and try to keep the dog from leavin mines on the singletrack!
    Good luck finding your new puppy!
    Previously known as: Norco

  9. #9
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    almost any large healthy dog can work

    the key is conditioning the dog, start gradual and build up. As a previous poster noted, many dogs will just keep going until they drop dead - so pay close attention for signs of stress and don't suddenly increase the duration or speed of your rides.

    Both shelters and reputable breeders can be sources of great dogs, but stay away from puppy farms and pet stores that sell dogs.

    I ride with my Alaskan Malamute (pictured in the Avatar). I actually place her in her sledding harness and attach her to the front of the bike with a long shock line. She loves it and absolutely goes nuts anytime I drag the harness out! She will pull me faster than I can sprint and would probably run herself into the ground if I let her. With a breed like this, heat exhaustion is a big concern and I never take her out when it is warm.

    LOL. Dogs truly are the best people you will ever know.

  10. #10
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    We have an Australian cattle dog (female) and a border collie (male). Both are great dogs for taking on mountain biking rides. Both (breeds) were bred to work all day in all conditions and, if fit, can handle very long rides. Both can be a handfull too, requiring lots of daily exercise and mental stimulation. At the worst, the ACD can be snotty, stubborn, and tough, while the BC can be hyper and easilly distracted. On the other hand, the ACD is one of the most reliable, loyal, and efficient dogs out there. The BC has amazing athleticism and learns things very quickly. We do agility and some limited herding with both dogs as well. Great breeds both, for the right people.

    Lots of breeds can be good dogs for mountain biking. Personally I would prefer medium size dogs over larger breeds for regular mountain biking. Big dogs just aren't built for that kind of stuff, IMO. Regardless of the breed, it is important to know your dog and his/her limits (the don't won't know them). Make sure the dog has water on rides and make sure you check pads, etc. Rember too that dogs can get out of shape. Also, some of the larger breeds like labs and goldens have a higher tendancy toward hip and knee problems. We had a lab/golden mix who had 2 knee surgeries and ended up with serious hip problems. Expensive. Just like with people, regular activity and a good diet are important (avoid crapy foods like IAMS and other grocery store brands). BARF (bones and raw food) is one of the best diets out there. And I would not take a dog mountain biking until age 1 at the very minimum. Just because they can doesn't mean they should. Things that happen early on can end up big problems years down the road.

    cowdog loves dogs...

  11. #11
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    I have been thinking about getting a dog from the humane society, but am unsure about the costs that are associated with it. Assuming the dog is healthy, what expenses are there other than dog food. So, how much are shots, trips to the vet, etc...?
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  12. #12
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    the best one IMO

    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...

    is a dead dog whose memories ride along with you in the trail.

    I've had some problems with live dogs in bike trails.

  13. #13
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    No, a dead dog is the best one, they don't get in the way.
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  14. #14
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    How about a dalmation?

    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...
    After all, dalmations are bred to be coach dogs - running alongside horses & carriages. I haven't taken our girl (5.5 years old) on any trails, but she'll chase/follow me on my bike. And, holy cow, does she love to run!

    Most areas have a dalmation rescue organization of some sort. Due to the popularity of the Disney movies, kids clamor for dalmations and parents run out and get one. Problem is, dals make for crazy puppies, probably along the lines of a border collies and labs, or worse. The unwitting parents had no idea what they were getting themselves into, are completely unprepared for the commitment it takes to raise a dal puppy, and off goes the dog to the humane society (if they're lucky).

    We got Hannah when she was 2, so she wasn't quite as crazy (but still high energy). Supposedly, they can turn into couch potatoes at around 5 years, but we haven't seen any signs of that. Dals are big sweethearts and love to be with their families. They're nice, big dogs, and have great endurance. And did I mention they love to run? Congenital deafness is probably the most common breeding-related health problem, but they either have it or they don't - it's not something that will later develop in a seemingly healthy dog. Oh, and they shed all year long, but at least it's a short coat.


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  15. #15
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    All dogs do is F-up the trails for other users. KEEP THEM AT HOME WHERE THEY BELONG!
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  16. #16
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    "Bout the first time your dog darts in front of me and causes me to crash, you'll wish you'd brought a gun.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  17. #17
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    golden owner chiming in- . They do not make great trail dogs. They are more like "oh, oh, oh, maybe that guy coming straight at me on his bike wants to stop and PET ME!!". They are sweet as pie, but a little lacking in the common sense department. Plus, you'd want to clip them to keep them from picking up every sticker within a 10 mile radius.

    That being said, I'm with the leave the dog at home folks. It's the rare owner that does an excellent jog of training the dog to have impecaable trail manners, picks up the crap, waters the dog, checks it's feet for damage etc. If the dog is a pain, it is always the owner's fault.

    formica

  18. #18
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    Dal Pal

    My dal love to go biking and, after a brief warmup, does a good job of hanging out with me and the bike. He likes to lead out and set the tempo. The thing I have to watch is to keep a moderate pace, esp. on the long downhills. On our desert trails, his feet start to wear at about 8 miles.

    To minimize interaction with un-dog-ho trail users, I go to trails that are less frequented. I find that on Friday evenings especially I'll have the trails all to myself. I guess everyone else is hitting the happy hour.

    .d.

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Blue
    After all, dalmations are bred to be coach dogs - running alongside horses & carriages. I haven't taken our girl (5.5 years old) on any trails, but she'll chase/follow me on my bike. And, holy cow, does she love to run!

    Most areas have a dalmation rescue organization of some sort. Due to the popularity of the Disney movies, kids clamor for dalmations and parents run out and get one. Problem is, dals make for crazy puppies, probably along the lines of a border collies and labs, or worse. The unwitting parents had no idea what they were getting themselves into, are completely unprepared for the commitment it takes to raise a dal puppy, and off goes the dog to the humane society (if they're lucky).

    We got Hannah when she was 2, so she wasn't quite as crazy (but still high energy). Supposedly, they can turn into couch potatoes at around 5 years, but we haven't seen any signs of that. Dals are big sweethearts and love to be with their families. They're nice, big dogs, and have great endurance. And did I mention they love to run? Congenital deafness is probably the most common breeding-related health problem, but they either have it or they don't - it's not something that will later develop in a seemingly healthy dog. Oh, and they shed all year long, but at least it's a short coat.


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  19. #19
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    Aussie Shepard

    My Puppy has been mtn biking with me for years...she goes a pace and forever. Just be careful in rocky places, she did cut her foot once.


    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH
    My dal love to go biking and, after a brief warmup, does a good job of hanging out with me and the bike. He likes to lead out and set the tempo. The thing I have to watch is to keep a moderate pace, esp. on the long downhills. On our desert trails, his feet start to wear at about 8 miles.

    To minimize interaction with un-dog-ho trail users, I go to trails that are less frequented. I find that on Friday evenings especially I'll have the trails all to myself. I guess everyone else is hitting the happy hour.

    .d.

  20. #20
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    The best dog for bikin'? Any dog that can run (most of them) and listens. The second part is important. The dog haters on here wouldn't have a problem with my dog- he gets out of the way when the pace picks up, he tends to run off the trail anyway, and one word- move- gets him the hell off the trail if necissary.

    The important thing was to train him first. First thing, your dog must listen to your commands, no if ands or buts. Don't take him anywhere near a trail or other people until he does. Then "girlfriend" rides. You know ones where the pace can be totally nmessed up and there is now-one there to complain. Once he's flawless with you, take him out with some buddies that like him for a tester. Make sure they know the command that gets him the hell out of the way. In Brisco's case "MOVE" is the ticket 'cause that's what I tought him. I've been lucky 'cause the B-dogg has spent a huge amount of time on trails, running, hiking and biking so it was fairly easy. Some friends dogs have not been so good and it's been intolerable. A little training would have gome a long way for those dogs, but now they have to stay at home.

    A dog should also be at least a year old until strenous exercise or you risk permanent physical damage. A pup will also be a friggin' hastle in the woods 'cause he'll be super dumb and not trained yet. I sacrificed a bunch of rides to hike and train the pup brfore he was old and trained enough but it was worth it and I wouldn't dream of touching rubber to dirt without him, and a bunch of my riding buddies probably like Brisco more than me by now.

    As with almost any dog "issue" it's the owner, not the dog. His behaviour is your responsibility, so make sure his trail behaviour is flawless.

    Dog on!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonlong
    I have been thinking about getting a dog from the humane society, but am unsure about the costs that are associated with it. Assuming the dog is healthy, what expenses are there other than dog food. So, how much are shots, trips to the vet, etc...?
    If you are asking about costs... don't get a dog. They are like children...

  22. #22
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    "Bout the first time your dog darts in front of me and causes me to crash, you'll wish you'd brought a gun
    No, a dead dog is the best one, they don't get in the way.

    Unbelievable. What the hell is wrong with some of you people. You know, its possible for any small or large animal to "dart" in front of you on the trail, cause your riding through their living room. Maybe you should just try to control yourself and your bike, and respect other trail users, including dogs. It's a DOG for chrissake! Now I know why some people DO ride with guns.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...
    I ride from time to time with 2 labs (both are sub 70 pounds). They are trained and respond to commands. When training dogs that are more "stubborn", use of a remote control shock collar does wonders and the canine responds to it quite well. You can purchase these at a good hunting store. You will want to train your dog to stay over on the right, to not go meet and greet hikers on the trail and to avoid wandering too far off the trail while chasing wildlife. Once training is in place - you have to find trails that allow pets without a leash to be on them. Those are few and far between - so make sure you are riding legally on such a trail.

    As has been mentioned, you have to start slow and with short distances to train them and then work your way up to longer distances. Keep distance in mind based on the conditions. The hotter it is, the slower and less distance you should cover. Have snacks and water for them. Best of all - ride where they are able to jump in some water and cool off. Stop every now and then to give them a rest. It may take you a few a while to train the dogs to ride 15 - 20 miles. I would keep it below 5 miles until the dog is at least a year old.

    BB

  24. #24
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    Some great, some not so great input

    Thanks to those of you with positive input.

    Those of you with negative or criminal input can keep it to yourself. Humans do not own this world or the trails. It is people like you (anynomous and Minkhiller) that usually lead to trail closer, not dogs. Take your aggresions out on the trail not in this forum or on dogs.

    peace
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by toad
    Unbelievable. What the hell is wrong with some of you people. You know, its possible for any small or large animal to "dart" in front of you on the trail, cause your riding through their living room. Maybe you should just try to control yourself and your bike, and respect other trail users, including dogs. It's a DOG for chrissake! Now I know why some people DO ride with guns.
    Yeah that's it, we all need guns on the trail. Brilliant!
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Thanks to those of you with positive input.

    Those of you with negative or criminal input can keep it to yourself. Humans do not own this world or the trails. It is people like you (anynomous and Minkhiller) that usually lead to trail closer, not dogs. Take your aggresions out on the trail not in this forum or on dogs.

    peace
    "trail closer"? I can't make trails any closer than they are now, they are very close to me. If you had done a search before starting this thread you would see that your question has been asked many times before. You would also find in there somewhere that I do let my dog come on the trails close to my house where there is rarely an encounter with another trail user. And I do take my aggressions out on the trails, riding them, building them, maintaining them and saving them. And yes humans DO own the trails. As far as keeping input to yourself, you are on an internet forum, you better grow thicker skin than what you have now.
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  27. #27
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    Get a clue!

    Quote Originally Posted by minkhiller
    "trail closer"? I can't make trails any closer than they are now, they are very close to me. If you had done a search before starting this thread you would see that your question has been asked many times before. You would also find in there somewhere that I do let my dog come on the trails close to my house where there is rarely an encounter with another trail user. And I do take my aggressions out on the trails, riding them, building them, maintaining them and saving them. And yes humans DO own the trails. As far as keeping input to yourself, you are on an internet forum, you better grow thicker skin than what you have now.
    Here is a little search for you, and frankly it was fairly easy. Do you realize what a hypocrite you are? I quote you:

    16 Hours Ago 08:44 PM
    minkhiller "All dogs do is F-up the trails for other users. KEEP THEM AT HOME WHERE THEY BELONG! "

    So which is it minkhiller? You seem to have a bit of explaining to do. It seems crazy to me that someone involved with bicycling can have their head buried so far in the sand. Here is the deal - we don't own anything, we are simply on this planet as its caretaker. There are endless other species in this thing with us. Dogs just happen to be closer to our hearts, in general.

    Futhermore, I don't think threatening to shoot dogs is a laughing matter, and I am positive that most of the members of this forum would agree. You are the one that needs to grow thicker skin. Share the trail, don't skid, pack it in and pack it pack it out... the whole package. To Quote Ron Burgandy, " Stay Classy"

    Out
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Here is a little search for you, and frankly it was fairly easy. Do you realize what a hypocrite you are? I quote you:

    16 Hours Ago 08:44 PM
    minkhiller "All dogs do is F-up the trails for other users. KEEP THEM AT HOME WHERE THEY BELONG! "

    So which is it minkhiller? You seem to have a bit of explaining to do. It seems crazy to me that someone involved with bicycling can have their head buried so far in the sand. Here is the deal - we don't own anything, we are simply on this planet as its caretaker. There are endless other species in this thing with us. Dogs just happen to be closer to our hearts, in general.

    Futhermore, I don't think threatening to shoot dogs is a laughing matter, and I am positive that most of the members of this forum would agree. You are the one that needs to grow thicker skin. Share the trail, don't skid, pack it in and pack it pack it out... the whole package. To Quote Ron Burgandy, " Stay Classy"

    Out
    Somebody get the gaff!
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Here is a little search for you, and frankly it was fairly easy. Do you realize what a hypocrite you are? I quote you:

    16 Hours Ago 08:44 PM
    minkhiller "All dogs do is F-up the trails for other users. KEEP THEM AT HOME WHERE THEY BELONG! "

    So which is it minkhiller? You seem to have a bit of explaining to do. It seems crazy to me that someone involved with bicycling can have their head buried so far in the sand. Here is the deal - we don't own anything, we are simply on this planet as its caretaker. There are endless other species in this thing with us. Dogs just happen to be closer to our hearts, in general.

    Futhermore, I don't think threatening to shoot dogs is a laughing matter, and I am positive that most of the members of this forum would agree. You are the one that needs to grow thicker skin. Share the trail, don't skid, pack it in and pack it pack it out... the whole package. To Quote Ron Burgandy, " Stay Classy"

    Out
    Could you please post a quote where I was threatening to shoot a dog?
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  30. #30
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    No problem

    Quote Originally Posted by minkhiller
    Could you please post a quote where I was threatening to shoot a dog?

    Sure, here you go


    17 Hours Ago 08:35 PM
    minkhiller "No, a dead dog is the best one, they don't get in the way. "

    Not to mention your support of guns on trails, and I quote you,

    "Yeah that's it, we all need guns on the trail. Brilliant!"


    Basically, you have ruined this thread. I wanted some help finding a dog for trail riding and you chime in with negativity. Let it go and hopefully find some peace with yourself. Get some help as well.

    Out
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Sure, here you go





    Basically, you have ruined this thread. I wanted some help finding a dog for trail riding and you chime in with negativity. Let it go and hopefully find some peace with yourself. Get some help as well.

    Out
    wrong, no one ruined this thread. You asked a controversial question on an internet forum. If you only want pleasant self supporting replies, this is not the place to ask. You could have reseached the dozens of previous threads on the same topic, and you'll see that there are lots and lots of opionion, not all of them postive, on this topic.

    formica

  32. #32
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    If it is OK to have the opinion that dogs shouldn't be on trails, then it is OK to have the opinion that bikes shouldn't be on trails, and so on. Within that collective "we" who makes decisions on the use of public lands, mountain bikers are a small minority. Exclusive views on how trails get to be used on public lands don''t help anybody, in my opinion.

    BTW, the original poster asked what dog to get, not "if" dogs should be on trails. If there is controversy, it is only in the minds of people with very narrow views of how public lands "should" be used. Those narrow types of views are one of the main reasons we have challenges with mountain biking on some public trails.

    Back to dogs. Humans and dogs have coevolved for 100s of thousands of years. Some believe we humans owe some of our success as a species to that "partnership." I love skiing with my dogs, biking with my dogs, hiking with my dogs, hunting with my dogs, ... Good stuff.

  33. #33
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    you sir are wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    wrong, no one ruined this thread. You asked a controversial question on an internet forum. If you only want pleasant self supporting replies, this is not the place to ask. You could have reseached the dozens of previous threads on the same topic, and you'll see that there are lots and lots of opionion, not all of them postive, on this topic.

    formica
    You are the one that is in the wrong. I didn't ask for anyone's thoughts about whether or not dogs should be on the trail. If you read the original post you will find that I asked for feedback on what dogs make good riding companions (that doesn't seem controversial). Some of you decided to read into it something else (i.e. should dogs be on the trail), fueled by either hatred or a bad experience. A typical threadjack.

    And yes, I wanted supportive and constuctive answers to actual posed question. I am open to opinions that stay on point.

    Go flame somewhere else.
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Sure, here you go


    17 Hours Ago 08:35 PM
    minkhiller "No, a dead dog is the best one, they don't get in the way. "

    Not to mention your support of guns on trails, and I quote you,

    "Yeah that's it, we all need guns on the trail. Brilliant!"


    Basically, you have ruined this thread. I wanted some help finding a dog for trail riding and you chime in with negativity. Let it go and hopefully find some peace with yourself. Get some help as well.

    Out
    You need to be a better judge of sarcasim....carrying guns on the trail is idiotic in my opinion. This fishing trip has come with no challenge, thanks for emptying my bait bucket so that I have to go riding now to pass the rest of the day.
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  35. #35
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    The best trail dog I have ever ridden with is a German Shorthair named Cali (who lives in Tahoe). She can do 30+ miles and we cannot lose her on the downhills. It is AMAZING to watch.

    But, she is a hyper nightmare at home.....hope you want to take her biking everyday.

  36. #36
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    great post

    Quote Originally Posted by cowDawg
    If it is OK to have the opinion that dogs shouldn't be on trails, then it is OK to have the opinion that bikes shouldn't be on trails, and so on. Within that collective "we" who makes decisions on the use of public lands, mountain bikers are a small minority. Exclusive views on how trails get to be used on public lands don''t help anybody, in my opinion.

    BTW, the original poster asked what dog to get, not "if" dogs should be on trails. If there is controversy, it is only in the minds of people with very narrow views of how public lands "should" be used. Those narrow types of views are one of the main reasons we have challenges with mountain biking on some public trails.

    Back to dogs. Humans and dogs have coevolved for 100s of thousands of years. Some believe we humans owe some of our success as a species to that "partnership." I love skiing with my dogs, biking with my dogs, hiking with my dogs, hunting with my dogs, ... Good stuff.
    Thanks for noticing the original content of this thread. I couldn't agree more
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    You are the one that is in the wrong. I didn't ask for anyone's thoughts about whether or not dogs should be on the trail. If you read the original post you will find that I asked for feedback on what dogs make good riding companions (that doesn't seem controversial). Some of you decided to read into it something else (i.e. should dogs be on the trail), fueled by either hatred or a bad experience. A typical threadjack.

    And yes, I wanted supportive and constuctive answers to actual posed question. I am open to opinions that stay on point.

    Go flame somewhere else.
    LOL, if you think I was flaming you....

    Good luck getting answers that only support your opinion on the internet.....

  38. #38
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    Have a great ride

    Quote Originally Posted by minkhiller
    You need to be a better judge of sarcasim....carrying guns on the trail is idiotic in my opinion. This fishing trip has come with no challenge, thanks for emptying my bait bucket so that I have to go riding now to pass the rest of the day.
    Didn't seem sacarstic to me. The poster that you replied to was not condoning guns on the trails. He was being sarcastic about your attitude towards dogs on trails.

    Anyways, enjoy your ride.
    "Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?"

  39. #39
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    Cowdogs. I have ACD/BC female mix(my last GF had horses and used both breeds to work them). Your description of both breeds are spot on. Smarter then me..strong..agle..tough..fast..loyal(but always testing)..and she can be a bit@h at times. I knew the mother and father which is cool. Had her since her eyes first opened and was singing for her moma. Shes almost 2yrs old now, and has been on countless mtb, hiking, and backpacking trips already. She is a machine, one that I wish had a reistat(sp) control to it(hell hath no fury like a bored cowdog puppy) sometimes. Just watch the heat, remember water always(they learn to drink from a waterbottle easy as pie), and watch the pace/mileage always. No "training" rides.

    Cassy' in my fenced in back yard a few days ago(hence the no collar, which is always on otherwise). This dog is in prime trail shape, and can do a "slow with lots of breaks" 15-18 mile ride anyday as long as its not hot summer. She lives to run.

    <img src="http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/bin/ft.dll/standard?pictid={96B96DCB-DD63-4E7D-B4B5-4B2C02E7180E}">
    Last edited by Duckman; 04-17-2005 at 12:42 PM.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Sure, here you go


    17 Hours Ago 08:35 PM
    minkhiller "No, a dead dog is the best one, they don't get in the way. "

    Not to mention your support of guns on trails, and I quote you,

    "Yeah that's it, we all need guns on the trail. Brilliant!"


    Basically, you have ruined this thread. I wanted some help finding a dog for trail riding and you chime in with negativity. Let it go and hopefully find some peace with yourself. Get some help as well.

    Out
    No no no, it would start with this " and end with this" and somewhere inbetween it would say...shoot dog...can't say that you have found that yet. Don't you get sick of the zinging noise?
    Your bike can take you anywhere, anytime, over any terrain but, you have to force it to GK 2004. BB1, who started it?

  41. #41
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    Mine's Fine

    So far so good - my nearly 2 year old goldie is great. She runs where she's supposed to, stays out of the way, leaves other riders alone, and has fun.

    That being said, if and when we start riding in other areas with more trail users I will likely leave her home. I don't have the time to devote to training her to be an impeccable trail dog and the one time she ruins a ride for another person will be one time too many.

    I have never understood the complaint about dogs crapping on trails (granted mine never has that I've known about). Correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't most trails, umm, in the wild? Don't other critters crap on the trail? I can tell you I've seen cow, moose, buffalo, horse, deer, bird, coyote, and bear dookie on the actual trail surface and it doesn't bother me much. Why's a dog different?

  42. #42
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    crap is crap. It stinks, it gets in the tires and shoes if you a walker.
    We've got some local trailheads where the parking lot and the first 2/10 of mile stink because of all the dog crap on the trail, or 3 feet off the trail. The least one should do is fling it off the trail with a stick.

    formica

  43. #43
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    Some good points brought up here.

    Don't take your dog on the trails until it's at least a year old. That way, the growth plates have closed and the risk of injury is decreased. Hiking's okay for an intro to trail etiquette (poop in the woods, don't chase animals, stay close, etc).

    Spend lots of time training (mental and physical) for the dog. Go through obedience training when they're young, practice lots, so when you introduce running with the bike, the dog will listen to you. If your trails have lots of sharp rocks, consider training your dog to wear booties at least until his/her pads have built up well.

    Bring enough water for the dog and yourself. A snack for the dog on long rides is a good idea, too. Some companies do have energy bars for dogs...but a partial meal of kibble and a collaspible bowl would be fine, too. As for WHAT to feed your dog, talk to your vet. Quality commercial diets have plenty of nutrients and calories for your pet. Your dog needs nutrients, not ingredients. If you want to use a BARF diet, make sure it is analyzed by a veterinary nutritionist so you can be certain your dog is getting a proper balance of nutrients. Dogs are naturally omnivorous, so they obtain their nutrients from a variety of sources. Many BARF diets are notoriously deficient in certain important nutrients, and oftentimes do not have the proper calcium/phosphorus ratio. Your vet can run calculations to determine how much of a particular food to give (based on calorie and nutrient content).

    Make sure your dog's personality would work in an off-leash trail environment. Dogs that are very happy-go-lucky and love people would not be welcomed by everyone. Not everyone is a dog lover, as should be painfully obvious by now. Your dog should be able to ignore people unless he is called. My dog is one of those happy-go-lucky mutts that I wouldn't consider for an off-leash trail run unless I was in a pretty remote, low-traffic area. When we go to the dog park, he's more interested in the people than the other dogs. He does well off-leash (always comes when called and obeys my other commands), but there are too many people out there willing to run him over, spray him with halt, or otherwise injure him that I'm not comfortable with his safety off-leash. As a result, I'm considering using a harness and shock-cord tether so he can pull me on the bike (or a scooter). He's a husky/lab mix and I think he'd do well in that case.

  44. #44
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    Bassett Hound

    My last dog was a Border Collie.........he's in doggie heaven

    My next dog may be a Bassett hound or Dachshund.........I'm kind of slow, and I hate it when the dog runs circles around me as I'm riding.
    Two Wheeled and Too Big

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowDawg
    If it is OK to have the opinion that dogs shouldn't be on trails, then it is OK to have the opinion that bikes shouldn't be on trails, and so on. Within that collective "we" who makes decisions on the use of public lands, mountain bikers are a small minority. Exclusive views on how trails get to be used on public lands don''t help anybody, in my opinion.

    BTW, the original poster asked what dog to get, not "if" dogs should be on trails. If there is controversy, it is only in the minds of people with very narrow views of how public lands "should" be used. Those narrow types of views are one of the main reasons we have challenges with mountain biking on some public trails.

    Back to dogs. Humans and dogs have coevolved for 100s of thousands of years. Some believe we humans owe some of our success as a species to that "partnership." I love skiing with my dogs, biking with my dogs, hiking with my dogs, hunting with my dogs, ... Good stuff.
    Well said. I hate when people think there way is the only way. I personally would not take my dogs riding with me but that is because I would rather not have to worry about them. On the other hand if someone wants to take there's that is up to them. Just like it is up to the individual if they want to ride a horse or walk on the trails. We need to not be so narrow minded because we are a much stronger voice if we can all get along and work together to keep our trails open.

  46. #46
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    I have a Labrador and he just loves hitting the trails. I strongly recommend one. They are loving, gentle, quiet, fun, energetic and great with young kids.
    Trev!

  47. #47
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    I had a goldie. He was awesome. I took him to Mamoth and he did the downhill from the top with me. By the time we got to the bottom, ~4mi?, he was ready for the apres-mtb-lounge.
    I now have a husky/aussie sheppard mix from the pound. She did 22mi(close to 30 in dog miles) in Moab with me last year and was a little tired at the end. Next day she was too sore to do Gemini Bridges ride, but really really wanted to.
    She is ~5yrs now, but still lots of energy. She needs a ride/run everyday. When she pulls me on my bike on the streets, we hit 20mph to start every ride. I wear out a lot of brake pads slowing her down, or just providing some extra resistance.

    The poster above gave great heads up about being prepared to run the dog daily.

    Good luck, you'll obviously love whichever breed you end up with.

  48. #48
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    Well, you're taking a risk by bringing your dog on a ride. I've killed three dogs in 20 years of trail use, both hiking and mtbing and will do it again I'm sure. If your dumb enough to have anything less than complete control of your dog and take it out in public off a leash, then you should expect that A, your dog will get loose and seem threatening to someone, and B, that person will either freak out, get bit, and sue your ass, or simply strike it dead in self defense. I've got something of a policy against not getting bit, and very little sympathy when it comes to predator vs myself.

    The choice is of course, your own, but keep in mind that I am not alone in this practice, and as you pass people on your trail rides, I could be anyone.



    That said, Australian Heelers make great mtbing dogs. I know six, and they're all great for riding with. But none of their owners will take them on trails off private land.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master Shake
    Well, you're taking a risk by bringing your dog on a ride. I've killed three dogs in 20 years of trail use, both hiking and mtbing and will do it again I'm sure. If your dumb enough to have anything less than complete control of your dog and take it out in public off a leash, then you should expect that A, your dog will get loose and seem threatening to someone, and B, that person will either freak out, get bit, and sue your ass, or simply strike it dead in self defense. I've got something of a policy against not getting bit, and very little sympathy when it comes to predator vs myself.

    The choice is of course, your own, but keep in mind that I am not alone in this practice, and as you pass people on your trail rides, I could be anyone.



    That said, Australian Heelers make great mtbing dogs. I know six, and they're all great for riding with. But none of their owners will take them on trails off private land.
    Wow. Please wear a name tag as I don't care to ever socialize or engage in conversation with you. If you think every living dog that moves toward your direction is a threat and a "predator" to you then you should be on medication for your illness.

  50. #50
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    WOW! quite a bit of hostility, I've never had a big problem with dogs on the trail, other than trying to mooch my snacks. A far as the poop on the trail, it's gross, and most often it's horsey poop around my neck of the woods.

    But to your original question, the above mentioned breeds of dogs are great to ride with (i've been on many rides with border collies, labs, blueheelers etc.) But the strangest and best dog I've ridden with is a Jack Russel, The thing was like the energizer bunny, fast and two feet from his owners back wheel, and never in the way. The owner actually challenged me to try and hit him and you couldn't he'd just hop out of the way. And as a side bonus smaller dogs have smaller food bills and smaller poops to clean up.
    it tied the room together man!

  51. #51
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    Walk your dog with a bike...

    If you want to ride with a dog keep in mind that your riding with your dog and not mountain biking... I've got a 10 year old yellow lab that I've made some mistakes with. The biggest is getting to into a ride and not realizing how hard he is pushing himself to keep up. They have to run really hard to keep up on a downhill! If you want to go for a hammer ride leave them at home and enjoy yourself. I've been fairly lucky but still given him heat stroke, cut paws, and injured his shoulder from running too fast downhill. I still ride with him, but to exercise him and not go for a mountain bike ride. If your serious about it get a rigid single speed, that'll get you in wicked shape and slow you down enough on the downhill so that you don't hurt your dog...

    From my experience 15 - 20 miles for a dog is too far, your eventually going to have problems.

    As for dogs on multi use trails.... DUH they are multi use?!? If you don't like to ride with people with dogs then don't ride with them... But don't whine when you come across somebody out using a multi use trail as you don't deam appropriate, you only make yourself sound like a hiker

  52. #52
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    Cattle Dog

    As others have said, Australian Cattle Dogs (also known as Blue or Red Heelers) make for great trail dogs in general. They literally stick right to you be it on a bike or a hike. I've often thought mine was off running somewhere and called for it only to find him directly behind me in my "blind spot" They are amazingly efficient dogs and can easily tag along on a 20 mile ride. Just yesterday I had mine out on a 20 mile'r, 9 of which was fast downhill. Kept at speed no problem. And true to their name, they heel right at your back tire - didn't even need to train ours. He doesn't stray at all from singletrack actually. They really are amazing dogs. And as loyal as the day is long.

    With the good does come bad at times though. They tend to be 1 person/family dogs, and sometimes aren't that good around kids. They usually aren't real keen on strangers in general. Not aggressive, but definitely don't like unkonwn folks approaching them. They tend to just shy back or flat out run away from strangers actually, but back 'em into a corner and there could be problems. Believe it or not, this has been good, as when hiking/biking, ours wants nothing to do w/ other people: ie - it doesn't bother anybody. They also *require* a good dose of daily excersice. At 3 years old, ours has settled down a lot, but at 1, without 3 daily walks... look out. Lastly, they historically have loooooooong life spans. 15 years is not uncommon. Something to think about long term.

    We got ours from the pound, and he's not full breed, but obviously he's largely Australian Cattle Dog. Looks a lot like a Dingo! And one last thing... they are amazingly natural frisbee dogs...
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  53. #53
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    Well, I may not completely agree with Master Shaker, but I can relate a little bit to what he's talking about. Having had my child attacked by a dog on more than one occassion (and no, he doesn't tease them and due to quick action, he's fine) I am wary of all dogs on the trail. Also, I don't want dog spit on me and would appreciate it if owners understood that fact. To go along with that, my son is allergic to dogs and we don't need them near him.

    Also, if a dog chases wildlife or livestock it is legal for a ranger or cattlerancher to shoot to kill. Bear that in mind when you think it's OK for your dog to chase cows, deer or elk.

    And the offended aren't the only people killing dogs. I've seen dogs die on the trail because the owner didn't know the limits of the poor animal. That's pretty tragic.

    So please train your dog, whatever breed it is. I like dogs, I really do, but they are a hazard to themselves and others if they are not well trained.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by screampint
    Well, I may not completely agree with Master Shaker, but I can relate a little bit to what he's talking about. Having had my child attacked by a dog on more than one occassion (and no, he doesn't tease them and due to quick action, he's fine) I am wary of all dogs on the trail. Also, I don't want dog spit on me and would appreciate it if owners understood that fact. To go along with that, my son is allergic to dogs and we don't need them near him.

    Also, if a dog chases wildlife or livestock it is legal for a ranger or cattlerancher to shoot to kill. Bear that in mind when you think it's OK for your dog to chase cows, deer or elk.

    And the offended aren't the only people killing dogs. I've seen dogs die on the trail because the owner didn't know the limits of the poor animal. That's pretty tragic.

    So please train your dog, whatever breed it is. I like dogs, I really do, but they are a hazard to themselves and others if they are not well trained.
    Hi Screampint,

    Alot of this is fairly off topic, which bread for riding, but so were my comments. I was trying to stress that your there to walk your dog and not out for a ride. The tone I get from your responce is that you run into alot of poorly trained dogs. I'm curious do you find this with just people riding with their dogs or generally with all dogs on the trails?

    One thing I have noticed is that dog owners tend to be too embarised to train their dogs in public. They have a list of excuses... But all that teaches the dog is that they can do whatever they want on a walk... I have to admit it wasn't much fun flipping Barney on his back in the middle of some park. But I'd rather be embarissed once than worrying of what he may do... Do you find that in most cases the dogs are not being disiplined?

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...
    I've got three dogs. the oldest is a black lab/golden retreiver cross. she was a speedy girl in her youth but she has slowed way down the last couple years. she's going on 7.

    youngest is a golden retreiver/unknown cross. she's fast with her youth (2 yrs), she can go forever.

    But the primo canine athlete in my house is my fiancee's dalmation. this guy has top speed over 35 mph and can keep a fast clip for miles. he's probably 3-4 years old. If you live in warm climate, I'd give any of the carraige dogs a serious consideration, they were originally bred to run along-side carraiges and have the genes for stamina and speed. Dalmations have their quirks to deal with, but like I said he's the top athlete in the house for sure.

    All three dogs are free litter/pound dogs, too!
    Last edited by ewarnerusa; 04-18-2005 at 10:49 AM.

  56. #56
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    orange ones

    Quote Originally Posted by zurC atnaS
    Looking into a dog that can go on mountain biking adventures (up to 15-20 miles). Any thoughts or experiences on the best breeds? I have some friends with Border Collies that are great, but the energy level may be a bit high for me...
    Like these dudes:
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  57. #57
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    Mister Shake,

    Can you tell the story of why you've had to kill the dogs? I don't want morbid gory details, but some background that may show another side of the story. I can understand the mentality -- we grew up with hunting dogs that were viewed as tools and nothing more, though we'd use pepper spray if we encountered a dog even though we had a shotgun under arm.

    That said, I don't hunt so our pooch is a family member. We've got a 2-year-old Chesapeake who's been on short rides (4-6 miles), but isn't trained well enough for my tastes to take her out in "public." (I just haven't worked with her enough but hope to get her up up snuff this summer.)

    I've done 12-mile hikes where she's romped and wrestled the whole way and wasn't phased. I think she'll eventually be a great trail dog, and is wonderful so far: tons of energy but extremely focused. Not daffy like Labs and Border Collies can be.

    But Chessies are supposedly hard-headed and not for everyone. I just wanted to brag about ours .

    J-

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master Shake
    Well, you're taking a risk by bringing your dog on a ride. I've killed three dogs in 20 years of trail use, both hiking and mtbing and will do it again I'm sure. If your dumb enough to have anything less than complete control of your dog and take it out in public off a leash, then you should expect that A, your dog will get loose and seem threatening to someone, and B, that person will either freak out, get bit, and sue your ass, or simply strike it dead in self defense. I've got something of a policy against not getting bit, and very little sympathy when it comes to predator vs myself.
    .
    You Cracker!!!!
    Trev!

  59. #59
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    Tasman slang, please!

    We get the usual American slang here enough. How abouts you use a little Strine when you go off next time.

  60. #60
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    I find that poorly trained dogs are not limited to mountainbiking owners. 2 of the three dogs that went after my son were not owned by mountainbikers. I find dogs in parks to be worse, as the highlight of the outing (for the dog) seems to be interacting with other beings (whether they be other dogs or humans). On the trails there is an infinite amount of other stuff to smell and check out.

    As far as discipline, most often the owners just yell at the animal, which doesn't seem to be very effective. "Dumb" dogs usually have dumb owners.

    I know of a few very trailworthy dogs, and they aren't interested in socializing with people or other dogs.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by screampint
    I find that poorly trained dogs are not limited to mountainbiking owners. 2 of the three dogs that went after my son were not owned by mountainbikers. I find dogs in parks to be worse, as the highlight of the outing (for the dog) seems to be interacting with other beings (whether they be other dogs or humans). On the trails there is an infinite amount of other stuff to smell and check out.
    I can see how dog parks would be worst, dogs can easily out run people. So they have to make their own "fun". Which at least with a bike they are focus on the owner more.

    Quote Originally Posted by screampint
    As far as discipline, most often the owners just yell at the animal, which doesn't seem to be very effective. "Dumb" dogs usually have dumb owners.
    Exactly they talk to their dogs like they understand them... I used a book by the monks of newsteek, they use pack mentality to train dogs. The idea is to make the owner the alpha member. You do simple things like eating before them to flipping them on their back and dominating over them to scold them. It can be a little embarissing, and got some strange looks, but its pretty rare that I have to do it much anymore. He is a yellow lab, extremely food focused, I've managed to train him to stay out of the kitchen and dining room.

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    Quote Originally Posted by canadian-clydesdale
    WOW! quite a bit of hostility, I've never had a big problem with dogs on the trail, other than trying to mooch my snacks. A far as the poop on the trail, it's gross, and most often it's horsey poop around my neck of the woods.

    But to your original question, the above mentioned breeds of dogs are great to ride with (i've been on many rides with border collies, labs, blueheelers etc.) But the strangest and best dog I've ridden with is a Jack Russel, The thing was like the energizer bunny, fast and two feet from his owners back wheel, and never in the way. The owner actually challenged me to try and hit him and you couldn't he'd just hop out of the way. And as a side bonus smaller dogs have smaller food bills and smaller poops to clean up.
    Not a big fan of dogs on mtb trails really, but, I have been super impressed by Jack Russels as well. Fast and quick. They let out a nice little squeal when youre tire rubs them too. Woops.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by minkhiller
    No no no, it would start with this " and end with this" and somewhere inbetween it would say...shoot dog...can't say that you have found that yet. Don't you get sick of the zinging noise?

    AH HAH! RIGHT THERE! IN QUOTES! Minkhiller said "shoot dog".
    if i were any older i might act my age

  64. #64
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    I would also recommend a dalmation. Ours was a great dog, although could be skittish around kids. A friend has a dal we bring on our rides. He has no problem keeping up and never seems to get tired. As mentioned before, they are long distance machines, bred to run along with the carriage horses.

  65. #65
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    you do have to deal with scenes like these when dog riding. then they want to get up on the bed later when you get them home....

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    I've had run-ins with dogs that didn't listen and its not a big deal, just keep them on public non bike specific trails till they're trained for bike specific trails. And people, don't talk about dogs messing up the trails, because trails get plenty of wildlife traffic so stop complaining or stay inside & away from the trails as animals respect the outdoors more than humans do. I'd take them to public trails with walkers/runners and other pets which cyclists should be keeping an eye out and possibly stopping for them. In the places i've lived the cyclists are to yield to others while at non-bike specific trails, but check your local trail rules at the trails,online, or local bike shops. Enjoy as dogs are mans best friend.

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    Healers are the best, I'm a blue healer fan. haha! They are a great family dog but really focus on one person. My brother and I had 2 pure bred brothers and are amazing, they are the best of dogs willing to do anything for you. One of ours was kicked by our belgian draft horse as a pup/young adult and that was eight years ago and still to this day he is as active as our large dog was of same age.

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    Black lab border collie mix - 7 years old and troops down single track. Powder hound too, like his daddy.

    Smart, athletic and outdoorsy dog. Obedient, focused dog.

    Does slow me down noticeably (on parts of the trail) and need to bring lots of water.

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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by BicyclistBob89 View Post
    I've had run-ins with dogs that didn't listen and its not a big deal, just keep them on public non bike specific trails till they're trained for bike specific trails. And people, don't talk about dogs messing up the trails, because trails get plenty of wildlife traffic so stop complaining or stay inside & away from the trails as animals respect the outdoors more than humans do. I'd take them to public trails with walkers/runners and other pets which cyclists should be keeping an eye out and possibly stopping for them. In the places i've lived the cyclists are to yield to others while at non-bike specific trails, but check your local trail rules at the trails,online, or local bike shops. Enjoy as dogs are mans best friend.
    2005 called, and wanted to say, thanks for your answer. They would also like to know if they should get a zero down interest only loan, and whether its wise to keep their Lehman Brothers stock - what should I tell them?

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    I will consider think about this for sure.

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    I was reading through the thread and then was like, "how'd I miss this one" and then... WTF these posts are from 2005. Lol

    I ride with a Siberian Husky. He got buzzed twice while he was learning and has never got in the way of a bicycle again. But they're notoriously difficult to train off-leash and I wouldn't recommend the breed for that reason. Plenty of pictures of him and others in the "dogs with passion" thread on here.

    My dog got in a fight with another dog on Monday while we were out on the trail. I foolishly tried to break it up by grabbing my dog and basically getting in the middle of it and the other dog locked onto my leg. Now I can't ride for at least a month and am on crutches with some really gnarly punctures on my calf.

    This could have happened hiking or doing anything with off-leash dogs though and wasn't really specific to MTB even though both of us were riders.

    There's a guy I see on the trails a lot who rides with some Austrailian cattle dogs. They seem to be really good for trails and the breed is very very obedient and easy to train.

    Gotta keep in mind that any dog won't be able to keep up on descents if you ride like I do and you'll need to slow your pace for'em though.

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    I have a boxer mix. He has more stamina on his four paws than I do on my mountain bike.

    He responds to voice commands, but I do try to ride when the crowds are few. That said, I really haven't had any negative interactions with any other users. If I keep riding, he follows and doesn't stop to talk to people unless I stop.

  73. #73
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    I've heard, and seen evidence that it's true, that small to medium dogs fair better for strenuous activity than larger dogs. Mine is about 75 lbs and he did very well riding me (did a 28 mile day once ) until he was about five or six... Then he started wearing his pads down on rides and generally wearing himself out too fast. Now he's a walker only.

  74. #74
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    I have a walker coon-hound bitch that could probably run for 30 miles.

    She is awful off leash and stays at home when the bikes come out.

    She's a hoot on a trail run though, if you could ever train one to not track a scent, they rip.

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  75. #75
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    I was thinking Australian Cattle Dog as well...sometime called Blue Healers here in the States. WE had one years ago, and she had just the right amount of energy, and also had a GREAT disposition in general. The only thing that was a problem with her was distraction - "SQUIRRELS!!" - she would be going along full tilt and then just stop and dive into the brush.
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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    rhodesian ridgeback. Bred for endurance and great personality. And with kids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rherring40 View Post
    rhodesian ridgeback. Bred for endurance and great personality. And with kids.

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    My gramps has one, awesome dogs! They do have a little hound dog spunk to em though.
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