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  1. #1
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    anyway to repair sidewall cuts in tubeless tires ?

    Hi,

    I'm running tubeless with Stan's. Not stoked to get a small cut in the sidewall and not have it seal up.

    My only thought is to use heavier sidewall tires, but is there anyway reasonable way to fix the leak ? These aren't big holes, just a small slice from a rock or something..

    or just toss the tires and forget about it?

  2. #2
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    Sidewall cuts are usually the death of any tire

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by metafizx View Post
    Hi,

    I'm running tubeless with Stan's. Not stoked to get a small cut in the sidewall and not have it seal up.

    My only thought is to use heavier sidewall tires, but is there anyway reasonable way to fix the leak ? These aren't big holes, just a small slice from a rock or something..

    or just toss the tires and forget about it?
    Go to this Tire fix help you will find some good ideas here.

  4. #4
    PeT
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    I've successfully patched the last 4 sidewall cuts that weren't sealed by my homemade tubeless brew. Clean the area real well, then treat it like a tube repair, sealing from the inside: rough it up with sandpaper, heavy on the glue (I actually use Elmer's rubber cement), let it dry to tacky (important), apply the patch and rub it down firmly, let it cure for a couple of days. I've got one tire (currently running it) that has three sidewall cuts patched. Figure the effort has saved me about $200 over the past two years by extending the life of tires. YMMV.
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  5. #5
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    thanks I'll try that...

    I hate tossing otherwise good tires because of a little cut, and tires are expensive..

    another idea is to just run a tube in that tire and run it down...nothing's perfect I guess.

  6. #6
    Bro Mountainbiker
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    Depends how big the cut is. If you are talking tears, the tire is done tubeless. You could always sew it up with fishing line and run it tubed. But thats not worth it to me.

    If my tires have small tears that stans wont reliably seal, I will cut out a small tube square and superglue it over the hole. Works for a while but will fall off eventually. They will typically last longer than sealant though (3 months) so just pull it off and re glue another one when changing your sealant.

    Also, they make vulcanized tire patches but Im not sure how well they work with sealant.
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  7. #7
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    You will need:

    1) A $50 bill
    2) Transportation to your local bike shop

    Step into the local bike shop and find a replacement tire. Very carefully, exchange the $50 for the new tire (you may receive change or have to add more currency). Take the new tire home and install. Ride.

    That's pretty much how you repair a torn sidewall.

    Actually, you can repair these like patching a tube, as long as you do as instructed above and the cut isn't too big. I've repaired them as shown on the Park Tool website. Park Tool Co. ╗ ParkTool Blog ╗ Tubeless Tire Mounting and Repair

  8. #8
    No Clue Crew
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    I use car tire repair kits from Auto Zone/Checker. Follow the directions and it works fine with sealant.

  9. #9
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    thanks for the tips!

  10. #10
    Mai
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    I had a small tear in my side wall. I bought a patch kit from my LBS and it has worked great for the entire season

    Two roads diverged in a yellow wood and I,
    I took the road less traveled by and
    It has made all the difference. R Frost

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I use car tire repair kits from Auto Zone/Checker. Follow the directions and it works fine with sealant.
    +1^^
    I almost always put a hole somewhere long before the tire's done.

    Just make sure you clean it good,I use BrakeCleen.

  12. #12
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    i know its pinkbike but you might find these tips to save your tire helpful. i have been using the slime radial tire patches with success.

    Tech Tuesday - Three Ways to Save A Leaky Tubeless Tire - Pinkbike

  13. #13
    Give it a crank
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    Even if you're able to get a patch on it, you'll need to keep an eye on it over time. It becomes a weak point on the tire which can lead to more failures. Patches also don't flex the same as the tire which is a really bad thing. I've had two sidewall tears "successfully" patched which worked but I never liked how they expanded over time.

  14. #14
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    I've successfully patched tire side walls with tube patches in the past but I've since switched to UST tires. If I have another side wall hole I'll just use an automotive tire repair patch. Also, the inside of the tire is thin, I don't recommend you sanding the area down.

  15. #15
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    sanding the inside of the tire LIGHTLY will help the contact cement bond or vulcanize or do whatever it does. take a look at some of the videos and pics and dont go wild with the sandpaper.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkonbobo View Post
    sanding the inside of the tire LIGHTLY will help the contact cement bond or vulcanize or do whatever it does. take a look at some of the videos and pics and dont go wild with the sandpaper.
    On a tube I sand, on a tire I don't.

  17. #17
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    I forgot, for trail repairs of small side wall holes, clean the area (outside of tire) & apply super glue. It actually holds for a long time, as in months. I'd still patch it once you made it home from the ride.

  18. #18
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    saved for future ref
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  19. #19
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    Yeah, careful with the sanding. I tried that with my Trek TLR tire. One stroke of the sandpaper and cord was showing. I put a big auto tube patch over the sanded area, but it would leak down overnight.
    Last edited by DennisF; 03-02-2013 at 09:29 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by metafizx View Post
    Hi,

    I'm running tubeless with Stan's. Not stoked to get a small cut in the sidewall and not have it seal up.

    These aren't big holes, just a small slice from a rock or something..

    or just toss the tires and forget about it?
    IF you ride in places where the penalty for failure is high, I'd toss it and forget it. Last thing I'd want to be thinking about when bombing down the steeps, or laid over at the crest of a HUGE berm is... GEEZ, I sure hope that patch holds...

    Just thinking about what a trip to the ER cost's for stitches or setting bones..... not worth the price of new rubber...

    EVER!

    gnewcomer aka OldMtnGoat

  21. #21
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    As others have said, results will vary a lot depending on size of cut and many other factors. With that being said, I have been nursing along a small block 8 (with paper-thin sidewalls) by using an automotive-type tubeless patch. If sanding, go very light. You may be better off just cleaning and maybe wiping with rubbing alcohol to clean (and let dry). Use the cement provided (or rubber cement) and let it get tacky. I like to apply the patch and clamp it (using 2 small pieces of wood to spread pressure to the entire patch) and let it set overnight.

    You could also nurse it along with a little bit more peace of mind by going back to a tube for the time being to "help" the patch a little bit. Another ghetto move is to inset a folded $1 bill between the sidewall and tube. I had done this once a couple years back in a pinch and forgot all about the dollar until I had to swap the tube due to a pinch flat. I was like, "why is there a buck in here-oh yeah, wow it really did work"
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  22. #22
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    Duct tape inside the tire (cleaned first), preferably Gorilla brand. Can't say it is a long term solution but guaranteed to let you ride it back out. I got a nasty scuff tear on a tire during a camping trip with the family and used some really cheap and weak duct tape and it kept my bike rideable for the duration of the vacation. Depending on the severity of the tear, I can see this lasting quite a while because many folks go ghetto tubeless with the Gorilla tape on the rim.

    Fred

  23. #23
    Front Range, Colorado
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    May I suggest buying a new tire. Even if you go through the "trouble" of patching it using any of the suggested solutions and it works. The duration of the the life of the tire you are going to be stressed in the back of your mind. Is it going to give way.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeT View Post
    I've successfully patched the last 4 sidewall cuts that weren't sealed by my homemade tubeless brew. Clean the area real well, then treat it like a tube repair, sealing from the inside: rough it up with sandpaper, heavy on the glue (I actually use Elmer's rubber cement), let it dry to tacky (important), apply the patch and rub it down firmly, let it cure for a couple of days. I've got one tire (currently running it) that has three sidewall cuts patched. Figure the effort has saved me about $200 over the past two years by extending the life of tires. YMMV.

    in addition to this i sew up the cut with dental floss first. helps with the structual integrity and prevent blowouts.

  25. #25
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    FLEX Seal

    Use the flex seal (spray can ) , selling in walmart, walgreens etc... easy and amazing spray, around $8 , home depot have some similar... great... i fixed 4 tires(shwalbe), the best product...!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails anyway to repair sidewall cuts in tubeless tires ?-dsc_0509.jpg  

    Last edited by alonso; 05-13-2014 at 07:52 PM.

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