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  1. #1
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    Anyone Box at home for cardio work?

    Even though I love MTB'ing,..there are so many days that I just cant get out on the trails . But things should be changing for me at work soon,..hopefully. But as a quick cardio and core strengthening session, (I think Im being inspired by the recent boxing matches on TV), I was wondering if anyone here boxes at home? Maybe a simple punching bag and some gloves would also help take out my daily frustrations and help me shed some of my muffin top off.

    thx for any input guys.

  2. #2
    dru
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    I boxed for a few years off and on. It is a super good workout although the potential for brain damage is something to consider too, if you end up getting addicted to the sport.

    Being I'm old now, I only muck around a bit at home in the man cave. I have a rather large steel framework I built out of angle iron that the heavy bag hangs from, since any kind of serious training will destroy floor joists if you attempt to hang a bag from one.







    It cleans up nice believe me!



    When I've actually got the basement free of bikes those mats cover the entire floor

    Those water filled stand-alone Century bags are pretty much useless once you start getting power, so you'll need to do something like I did, or get a self supporting stand for your bag. These work OK but need a lot of height, maybe 7 or 8 feet.

    You'll need good quality leather bag gloves and good quality wraps and you'll need to learn to wrap your hands properly or you will break or sprain things.

    As for the workout itself, you'll find doing rounds pretty exhausting. You'll go anaerobic almost guaranteed (especially on a heavy bag) before the round is over until you learn to relax and pace yourself. Each round you do makes it harder to recover for the next.

    When I was training more regularly I'd do a good 15 3 minute rounds per work out, punching at well over 100 punches per round. I have 4 stations that I rotate through: heavy bag, double end bag, mirror, and shadow boxing. A decade ago I could get away with a 30 second rest between rounds, but there's no way I'd get away with less than a minute now as I'm 48 and somewhat out of shape. I could also go 3 or 4 rounds back to back on the heavy bag, but again not now. I need to change stations at least every two rounds, otherwise I'm simply too gassed (meaning can't punch/no power if I can).

    You need a really strong aerobic base to do the above, so riding is an ideal fit for that portion of the training. Running and skipping are the traditional methods a gym uses for this conditioning. In addition, for muscular fitness and additional suffering there are tons and tons of pushups, sit ups, wind sprints and burpees too. It doesn't hurt to hit the weights too.

    Of course, if you get into it, go join a gym, even if you aren't interested in fighting. Lots of gyms will let you train either way.
    occasional cyclist

  3. #3
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    Thx dru. I myself am 40, and have NO plans to ever take on anyone in the ring, LOL. Just like you, I only want to do this for myself in my own man cave too. Ive never hit a bag or put on gloves before. So the info you just shared really helps me out. I didn't realize I had to wrap my hands before gloving up. I can probably only afford to hit up the Academy Sports store for what I need. I have a power squat rack that can handle the weight of the bag. Just not sure if the height is enough. I appreciate what you've shared and plan on investigating some more thru the web.

  4. #4
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    I do not.
    Life will pound away where the light don't shine, son...

  5. #5
    dru
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    squat rack

    A squat rack will probably be fine strength wise but is pretty useless for a bag. You need to be able to circle at least 180 deg and preferably 360 unimpeded. You won't be able to throw hooks, nor move side to side with a squat rack. As well, you want that bag to move after you've popped it so you can move with it.

    Once I was boxing for a little while it dawned on me that moving your feet is just as important as moving your fists. This is why really good fighters don't get hit much. Pop, pop, pop, MOVE, pop, pop, MOVE! You can't do that with a squat rack.

    You can find tons of good video online for how to throw punches correctly as well as tons of training drills. Get a big mirror and work on your technique. Once you realize that ALL your power comes from your legs and hips you'll see a big jump in punching power.

    You also run the risk of punching the squat rack. I once punched a tree full tilt because I was chasing the bag which I had hanging from a tree. Luckily for me I was dead tired and have a somewhat weak left hook. My knuckle swelled up right away and stayed that way for 6 months. My hands were wrapped which probably saved me from a broken hand.

    Just so you know, bags cause a lot of vibration and movement despite being only 90 or 100 lbs. My homemade bag stand is held down with 800 lbs, otherwise it starts walking across my basement floor.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  6. #6
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    Hand wraps, hand wraps, HAND WRAPS!!! Learn to wrap them correctly. Having a boxers break sucks!
    Academy has decent stuff to start out with. Titlemma.com has a great selection of gear as well!

  7. #7
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    I bought a heavy bag off CL about a month ago and used it to aggravate a case of tennis elbow to the point I can't use it (the bag) any more. Be careful.

  8. #8
    dru
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    Quote Originally Posted by veryavgwhtguy View Post
    I bought a heavy bag off CL about a month ago and used it to aggravate a case of tennis elbow to the point I can't use it (the bag) any more. Be careful.
    Yeah, I should've mentioned that working out can be very hard on the joints, especially when you are beginning.

    Bag work and double end bag work can tear up your elbows pretty good if you are trying too hard to kill it. You'll end up hyper-extending your arm(s) if you aren't careful (from missing b/c the bag has moved) and that can take a long time to heal. Practicing correct technique in front of a mirror and during shadowboxing can really help with not overextending when working the bag.

    As well, until you get good at keeping your wrists at the correct angle you'll end up torquing a wrist at some point too. This is another reason why wrapping your hands correctly is so important, as it drastically lessens the amount of injury you receive.

    It takes a few months of work to toughen up your hands, be patient.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dru View Post
    A squat rack will probably be fine strength wise but is pretty useless for a bag. You need to be able to circle at least 180 deg and preferably 360 unimpeded. You won't be able to throw hooks, nor move side to side with a squat rack. As well, you want that bag to move after you've popped it so you can move with it.

    Once I was boxing for a little while it dawned on me that moving your feet is just as important as moving your fists. This is why really good fighters don't get hit much. Pop, pop, pop, MOVE, pop, pop, MOVE! You can't do that with a squat rack.

    You can find tons of good video online for how to throw punches correctly as well as tons of training drills. Get a big mirror and work on your technique. Once you realize that ALL your power comes from your legs and hips you'll see a big jump in punching power.

    You also run the risk of punching the squat rack. I once punched a tree full tilt because I was chasing the bag which I had hanging from a tree. Luckily for me I was dead tired and have a somewhat weak left hook. My knuckle swelled up right away and stayed that way for 6 months. My hands were wrapped which probably saved me from a broken hand.

    Just so you know, bags cause a lot of vibration and movement despite being only 90 or 100 lbs. My homemade bag stand is held down with 800 lbs, otherwise it starts walking across my basement floor.

    Drew
    Yeah,..you're totally right about not being able to move around within the rack. Is it really necessary to get a bag that is half my body weight? Thats what Ive come across on the web. Im about 223.

  10. #10
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    Take a class on basic boxing skills before work on a heavy bag. I've seen friends who have absolutely no training at all playing with my punching bag and it's pretty scary. Not only do you risk injuring yourself, but you're not going to get as good of a workout as oppose to doing it properly.

    Also get a pair of actual boxing gloves, not those stupid MMA grappling gloves that all the newbies seem to love for some weird reason.

    In regards to bag weight, I'm 155lbs and I have a 100lb bag.... It's barely adequate. The problem you'll run into with a really light bag is it'll swing too much or the whole entire stand will start moving/rocking back. I'd suggest you get one at least 100lbs if not more.

    As for hand wrapping.... if you learn proper technique and don't start off trying to kill the bag, you'll be fine.

    Have fun.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Goes Boing View Post
    Take a class on basic boxing skills before work on a heavy bag. I've seen friends who have absolutely no training at all playing with my punching bag and it's pretty scary. Not only do you risk injuring yourself, but you're not going to get as good of a workout as oppose to doing it properly.

    Also get a pair of actual boxing gloves, not those stupid MMA grappling gloves that all the newbies seem to love for some weird reason.

    In regards to bag weight, I'm 155lbs and I have a 100lb bag.... It's barely adequate. The problem you'll run into with a really light bag is it'll swing too much or the whole entire stand will start moving/rocking back. I'd suggest you get one at least 100lbs if not more.

    As for hand wrapping.... if you learn proper technique and don't start off trying to kill the bag, you'll be fine.

    Have fun.
    thx Will. Your point on bag weight makes perfect sense. Today, I noticed while at Academy, that the lighter bags DID cause the free stand to move. So yup, I intend on getting the 100lb 'er, if not more. Do you know anything about this C3 Foam stuff around the bag? One 100lb bag with C3 Foam was like 15.00 more than another 100lb bag w/o the Foam.
    Also, I saw the wraps that come in different lengths and saw some you tube vids,..seems like a lot of work and time to properly roll your own hands. BUT, whats the story on some of these other wraps that are also part of a gel glove? Slips on, with nothing over the fingers, knuckles are padded, and then theres some roll to go around the wrist. Then I guess now you put your hands in a real glove made for heavy bag work? Is this new? Personally, those have my attention, rather than spending too much time to wrap and wrap. And yes,..I just wanna have some fun and burn some calories. I promise not to even "attempt" to kill the bag .

  12. #12
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    P90X has a bunch of different dvd workout programs. One of them is KenpoX which is basically cardio kickboxing. It's a decent workout if you want it to be.
    You can also download Bas Rutten's MMA workout. It's Bas Rutten (famous mixed martial artist and all round funny dude) telling you what to do. "Jab, cross, hook. Jab, cross, hook, uppercut. SPRAWL!"
    That will wear you out.

  13. #13
    Chubby Chaser
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    Quote Originally Posted by dadstoy View Post
    thx Will. Your point on bag weight makes perfect sense. Today, I noticed while at Academy, that the lighter bags DID cause the free stand to move. So yup, I intend on getting the 100lb 'er, if not more. Do you know anything about this C3 Foam stuff around the bag? One 100lb bag with C3 Foam was like 15.00 more than another 100lb bag w/o the Foam.
    Also, I saw the wraps that come in different lengths and saw some you tube vids,..seems like a lot of work and time to properly roll your own hands. BUT, whats the story on some of these other wraps that are also part of a gel glove? Slips on, with nothing over the fingers, knuckles are padded, and then theres some roll to go around the wrist. Then I guess now you put your hands in a real glove made for heavy bag work? Is this new? Personally, those have my attention, rather than spending too much time to wrap and wrap. And yes,..I just wanna have some fun and burn some calories. I promise not to even "attempt" to kill the bag .
    I've never heard of the C3 foam, but I wouldn't spend a lot on it. The truth is that most punching bags end up collecting dust in people's garages/basements. Heck, you should just buy a used set off craigslist.

    Wraps do take a long time to do.... IMO you don't even need it. As I said technique is what's going to keep you from getting injured. Get a cheap pair of full sized boxing gloves, and just start training.

  14. #14
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    I use those 'stupid' MMA gloves (I'm a perpetual newb) because they come with velcro wrist wraps, and they are versatile (can grab a kettle bell or barbell between rounds etc). Love em. Used to wrap my hands all the time, but its a pain. I don't use the bag for all out strength but rather cardio and speed, and I use a lighter bag, maybe 85-90lbs so it swings more, and I duck and weave more because of it.

  15. #15
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    I got a few amateur fights. You need to go to a gym to see how to properly work a bag......Also, you need to have room to move around the bag 360 degrees.

    A bag thats light and moves alot isnt a bad thing but youll have to improve your footwork in order to stay in proper position with it.......

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