• 11-08-2012
    Captain Duderino
    Anybody know the alloy and heat treat recipe for skewer ends?
    The nice steel shimano ones that last *forever?

    *Figuratively speaking..
  • 11-08-2012
    Mr.Magura
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Captain Duderino View Post
    The nice steel shimano ones that last *forever?

    *Figuratively speaking..

    It is somewhat unclear to me, what your question is?

    If you can explain, I may be able to give you the answer ;)


    Magura :)
  • 11-08-2012
    steadite
    No clue, but I would guess they're not heat treated at all. Just cold forged low carbon stuff would be my guess.
  • 11-08-2012
    Captain Duderino
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    No clue, but I would guess they're not heat treated at all. Just cold forged low carbon stuff would be my guess.

    Yeah, as I see chew marks in the dropouts of my older steel frames that have come to me with their original brake pads and tires, I assume that the skewers are also original, but their teeth are not flattened any more than the new ones at the store, I have to lean towards the total opposite of that idea unless campag, miyata, and other 80's jap dropouts are an even softer highschool metalshop tool-steel type. I suppose maybe dropouts don't need to be very hard?

    I don't know, though. That's why I ask. Thanks.
  • 11-08-2012
    DavyRay
    Why? Are you looking to make new skewers?
  • 11-08-2012
    customfab
    You could probably do them out of drill rod and do a basic heat and quench to harden them.
  • 11-09-2012
    Fleas
    The Shimano QRs are probably cold-headed/stamped, just like a bolt head. That amount of deformation ("cold working") makes them harder. For costs sake, that's probably all they see + the plating. Forged dropouts are probably not quite as hard. They are pretty tough, though.

    -F
  • 11-10-2012
    Captain Duderino
    Cool, thanks guys.