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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by doghead View Post
    Both my brother in law & myself have 26er's & 29er's, both never get ridden since we switched over to 650B over a year ago.
    We both went on & won our NorCal XC championships classes this season on 650b's.
    I had to add in 650's to my 2010 26 Spark, this turned it into a XC monster!
    It's much faster then the new 26 or 29er Sparks (ridden both).
    So Please save the BS about how great your wheel size is compared to the 27.5's,
    Scott won both the World XC championships & World Cup XC on 650b's, a "Size They Did NOT Even Sell!!" Because it Tested better then both 26 or 29 (Sizes they Sold), when run side by side with exactly the same setup!
    Congrats on your wins. I'm sure it had nothing to do with your training and fitness. It was all about the wheel size.

    I know how well placebos can cure illness too.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by doghead View Post
    Scott won both the World XC championships & World Cup XC on 650b's, a "Size They Did NOT Even Sell!!" Because it Tested better then both 26 or 29 (Sizes they Sold), when run side by side with exactly the same setup!
    Playing devil's advocate, what if I don't ride XC or don't care about going fast? Is the performance of 650B in XC races still relavant to me in some way? What if the trails I ride are completely different than what's found on an XC race course? Does it still matter?

  3. #103
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    For what it's worth there is literately a little bit of everything in the W.C. X-country these days.
    I had not watched any in years and was amazed at how technical some sections are now.
    As someone who has ridden MTB's since early 90's I personally have seen more growth in my skills and more fun since switching to 650b three years ago.
    As always your millage may vary.

  4. #104
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deep Thought View Post
    Consumers don't drive innovation, though. Race teams and their sponsors do.
    however, original Klunker riders, Rock Shox, Breeze and Angel, Stan's, Hayes, and Burro Bikes (among many others) were not part of any real 'race teams' or 'sponsor driven' in their infancy. Yet their innovations drove what you ride today, completely.
    your premise is flawed.
    Race teams may test and refine emerging innovation, but a ton of great ideas came from tinkerers and privateers.
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deep Thought View Post
    Consumers don't drive innovation, though. Race teams and their sponsors do.
    Race teams developed the dropper post?

    AM bikes?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  6. #106
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    Read My post!
    Breeze and Angel...first dropper post!

    AM bikes, well, yes. I'll concede that. The first DH fork was a dual crown RS, built for the 'black box' DH race team. DH 'race teams' were around before 'AM bikes', which often were one and the same.
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  7. #107
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by aerius View Post
    Playing devil's advocate, what if I don't ride XC or don't care about going fast? Is the performance of 650B in XC races still relavant to me in some way? What if the trails I ride are completely different than what's found on an XC race course? Does it still matter?
    What matters if race times and going fast do not, is obviously what makes you smile the widest on the trails you like to ride. There are so many factors involved in picking a bike : from wheel size, to suspension, to geometry, to gearing, to bike weight, etc etc. You demo, you experiment, you ride as much as possible, you decide. It is more than possible that no one bike will do it all, all the time, so people are prone to own quivers of 2,3,4 or more mtbs
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    Read My post!
    Breeze and Angel...first dropper post!

    AM bikes, well, yes. I'll concede that. The first DH fork was a dual crown RS, built for the 'black box' DH race team. DH 'race teams' were around before 'AM bikes', which often were one and the same.
    If you were responding to my post, I think we have our wires crossed
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  9. #109
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    my .02
    I personally think this whole wheel size debate is just a fad. I remember when I started riding in the late 90s, the big fad was front suspension. And it was thought that eventually everyone would have it. then the early 2000s came around and full suspension became the next thing. Now you may be wondering, how can I declare suspension a fad when it is still the very popular. Well because now we are in times where it is once again cool to ride bikes that are rigid. The times when it is thought that suspension is necessary are over. and thus the suspension 'fad' is over as well.

    This whole wheel size debate seems to be following the same pattern. I am sure in ten or fifteen years from now, we will still see a variety of sizes of wheels but the thought that one particular size is best will likely pass on.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by sagealmighty View Post
    my .02
    I personally think this whole wheel size debate is just a fad. I remember when I started riding in the late 90s, the big fad was front suspension. And it was thought that eventually everyone would have it. then the early 2000s came around and full suspension became the next thing. Now you may be wondering, how can I declare suspension a fad when it is still the very popular. Well because now we are in times where it is once again cool to ride bikes that are rigid. The times when it is thought that suspension is necessary are over. and thus the suspension 'fad' is over as well.

    This whole wheel size debate seems to be following the same pattern. I am sure in ten or fifteen years from now, we will still see a variety of sizes of wheels but the thought that one particular size is best will likely pass on.
    Umm, you should look up the definition of fad. Suspension on mtbs is considered the norm. Unless all bike companies start selling their bikes without suspension all of a sudden...

    Chainstay mounted U brakes were a fad, lol.

  11. #111
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    I re-read what I wrote up there earlier and just wanted to add a few things.

    Again, do we need or have to have 650b? Nah, we don't. But then again we could have said that about so many other things with mountain biking. Will it replace 26"? No. But then again, who cares? I for one have evolved with my bikes and technology as saw I wanted and could afford. I personally have a mix bag of old school/new school. Guess it's always come down to compromises on a lot of factors $$ being one of them. My 2007 Turner Spot with HL rear and 650b front and 26" rear with old school thumb shifted 9 speed extra low gears for climbing is where my bike has evolved to. I have resisted all these years of anything new because of weight vs cost vs what will I gain over what I have now. In fact, my Turner replaced a 1998 Psycle Werks Wild Hare (24lb disk brake 4.5" FS bike). Even then all the new bikes only had marginally more travel and behaved better but were boat anchors compared to the PW.

    Still, with all the technology, I'm the nut that has to turn the cranks and control the bike to get it where I want it. No replacement for Time In The Saddle. Fun Factor and wells full of great memories.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbogrover View Post
    Umm, you should look up the definition of fad. Suspension on mtbs is considered the norm. Unless all bike companies start selling their bikes without suspension all of a sudden...

    Chainstay mounted U brakes were a fad, lol.
    Biopace crankset

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Biopace crankset
    Rotor Q-rings
    Something wrong with your bike? Blame it on super human strength and sleep well at night knowing you are more than a man.

  14. #114
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    I definitely see a market demand for 650B wheels... It will satisfy the needs of many riders who want the advantage of a bigger wheel but can't get suitable standover/frame geometry for them...

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