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Thread: 1 x 10

  1. #1
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    1 x 10

    For those that run a 1 x 10 what type of terrain do you ride on?
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    Everywhere that suits my hard tail and my somewhat limited technical skills I have no problem with my 1x10. In other words, I am terrain constrained by my lack of suspension and myself but not my drivetrain. When I ride my full suspension bike which is a 3x9 26er then I find climbing more difficult despite the easier gearing. Probably because of the extra 7 lbs that the bike weighs, the bobbing, and the rider positioning.

    I have a 36t in the front and a 11/36 on my 1x10 HT. There are times when I'd like a lower gear but not when I feel 100%.

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    My local loops are 1,200 ft of climbing in 7 miles (it's 3.5 miles straight up, 3.5 miles straight down), 1,800 ft in 12 miles, 1,400 ft in 8 miles, etc.

    I ride 1x10 with a 30T front ring (just swapped to 28T but haven't ridden it yet) and a 11-36 cassette. It's fine but obviously I wanted a little lower gearing. I use the top half of my cassette most of the time so I'm fine to give up a little top end that I almost never use. If it's steep enough to need the 11T cassette cog, I'm probably not pedaling anyway. Pavement would be the only place I'd lose any speed.

    Anyway, I'm 240lbs and on a 5.5" travel 29er. Hope that helps. I couldn't even imagine a 36T chainring like the guy above me. I'd NEVER use the smallest cassette cog and climbing would suck.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREYSKULL View Post
    For those that run a 1 x 10 what type of terrain do you ride on?
    You ought to specify what you're interested in learning; does the chain fall off the single ring, or is the gearing range appropriate for the sort of trails that you do. Or maybe something else.

    For me, i rode 32x11-34 1x9 pretty much everywhere for several years, but i put a granny back on and got a blackspire stinger when i realized i could ride longer and subsequent days by gearing down. The newer 1x10 hardware is pretty cool, but i'm not due for a drivetrain upgrade.
    .

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    Mid-Atlantic rolling, technical single track. I have not ridden mine in the mountains. Its like a SS; you just need to try it and you will likely find that you don't miss that granny as much as you think you will.
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    terra firma is the ground I roll on.

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    I ride steep mountainous terrain and even some road without ever wanting higher or lower gearing but it's 1X11.

    28t front ring with 10X42 cassette. Yes I need the granny for here " WV/VA " .

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    28 or 30 up front with a 10-42 cassette sounds perfect.

    I just can't stomach a $300+ cassette and not a fan of SRAM shift feel or durability.

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    Anything, and I walk the bike when I can't pedal it.

    My setup is 30t front and 11-36 rear AM type 29 wheel. The very short chain stays require a little compromise with posture. It works for my getting up a small ski hill but a recent experiment of a ride with 1000 feet of climbing steep, tight and rocky stuff in a mile will probably have me use my granny geared smaller wheel and wheelbase bike the next time there.

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    I think that most people can get used to tougher gearing after some time. Remember, that you end up doing the same work (putting out the same wattage) when you ascend at a given speed independent of gearing. Easier gearing doesn't add some magical motor, it just changes how your motor operates. The only caveat would be if you have knee issues. You'll want to stick with doubles and triples if you have knee problems.

    For me as a 190 lbs rider my power output and poor technical skills begin to collude against me at 25% to 30% inclines. I get so slow that it becomes difficult for me to stay on the bike, I begin having real problems clearing obstacles, and I have to start worrying about back flipping. That happens to me on my main bike with a 36t 11/36 1x10 29er as well as my triple chainring 26er.

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    I have a 1*9. my trails are fairly rocky and slow (compared to the East Coast where I am from). No issues
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    Are there any advantages? I ride in southern California so i dont know if it has more or less elevation changes than other places. But i still need my granny gear to get up some hills and i like to go fast on flatter areas. I can see it saving some weight and maybe the simplicity of it but other than that i wouldnt want to loose my top end. I figured most ppl that do the switch ride in mostly flats areas...
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREYSKULL View Post
    Are there any advantages? I ride in southern California so i dont know if it has more or less elevation changes than other places. But i still need my granny gear to get up some hills and i like to go fast on flatter areas. I can see it saving some weight and maybe the simplicity of it but other than that i wouldnt want to loose my top end. I figured most ppl that do the switch ride in mostly flats areas...
    Simplicity, weight, etc.

    See my post above, anything but flat here.

    I mainly ditched my 2x cuz my bars were too cluttered with the dropper post control I added but now I won't ever ride a multi chainring setup unless there's a single shift lever to control it all (like on the new XTR di2) or it's a road bike and built into the brake lever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GREYSKULL View Post
    Are there any advantages? I ride in southern California so i dont know if it has more or less elevation changes than other places. But i still need my granny gear to get up some hills and i like to go fast on flatter areas. I can see it saving some weight and maybe the simplicity of it but other than that i wouldnt want to loose my top end. I figured most ppl that do the switch ride in mostly flats areas...
    While there are rational reasons why people like 1x10 it also appeals to people who simply want to do more (or at least as much) with less. Riders go rigid, single-speed and locally we have a bunch of folks who like to mountain bike on unicycles. Simplified drivetrains such as 1x10 have some of that appeal without going overboard.

    Normally those riders who intentionally make their lives harder for themselves don't tend to shy away from climbing. Try this for fun: Next time you see a single speed biker on your favorite climb, challenge them to a little race and see what happens :-).

    You'll probably find few people use 1x10 in flat areas because they'll spin out to often.

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    If there are no mountains then 1x10 is a fantastic option.
    Even in moderately hilly areas I have found 32x11-36 29er to be plenty of bottom end. Once my legs improve I think I will switch back to 34x11-40 for a bit more top end speed.
    After two years of physiotherapy for a weak knee I am finally tackling 99% of my local trails without having to dismount or put my foot down.
    If you switch give up top end first... You will simply be a bit slower. Getting up the hill is more important. As you improve in strength and skill increase front ring size

  17. #17
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    I run a 28t chain ring and 11-36 cassette on one of my 29ers. I live in the mountains and am able to climb everything I can do with a granny ring double up front. That being said, I do grind and mash the steepest climbs which is hard on my knees.

  18. #18
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    I have a 1x9 hardtail ( 11/36 36t ) and a full suss 2x10 ( 11/34 26/38t ) and keep grabbing the hardtail over the fully, it's just more fun and a challenge ridding the hardtail over difficult terrain although i find that the difference, after you get used to it, is a lot less than first imagined.
    I considered before about changing to a 1x11 setup but it's too much of an hassle ( read money wise ) just to save my butt on the very steep climbs, i just get my butt of the saddle and walk a bit.

    My 1x9 is running flawlessly and until i cannot get a hold on good 9spd parts i won't be changing anytime soon.
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    I ride 1x9. 32T up front and 11-34 cassette. I can ride up very very steep hills in my granny gear. And still go 40 mpg on descents (gravel/tarmac). I'm a skinny guy but I have pretty strong legs. Other guys I know ride 1x10 with a 28T up front. They loose speed on flat gravel roads. I have no problem keeping up with 2x10s and 3x10s in races. I'm in pretty good shape at the moment but nothing spectacular. I feel that your body (legs) just adjust to how many gears you have.

    I dont care about weight (way way overrated in my opinion) but the simple handle bars are nice. For me, its more of a mental than a mechanical thing. You have all your gears in your right thumb and index finger (Shimano) and that is all you need to worry about. A bike that is simpler to ride gives you more focus to ride and enjoy the trail.

  20. #20
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    I have 30t w/11-36 currently and I honestly handle the longer climbs I have here in the Midwest better now than I did 2x10. Nothing really steep but decent in some places. I did it for simplicity because I could never get my fd to shift as cleanly/quickly as it should. 1x for me has rapidly been making me a stronger climber and riding more fun as being a Clyde I can't spin for crap, I use power.

    Its a preference thing, some like 3x, some 2x but terrain and ur rising ability determine what u need/use.
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  21. #21
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    Every type of terrain, from flat to straight up, short rides to super long rides. Most people are convinced they can't turn a higher gear, but given two weeks they'd almost not even notice it. Crazy high gears like dura-ace cassettes on 34t front rings are beyond most people's abilities or wants, but 36t caseettes with 32 or 30t front rings is good for most everything, and those that claim it's "not possible" to ride their terrain without a 20t front ring would be surprised what they can do given a couple weeks to adapt.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElwoodT View Post
    I run a 28t chain ring and 11-36 cassette on one of my 29ers. I live in the mountains and am able to climb everything I can do with a granny ring double up front. That being said, I do grind and mash the steepest climbs which is hard on my knees.
    What crank is the 28t setup?

    Thx.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Every type of terrain, from flat to straight up, short rides to super long rides. Most people are convinced they can't turn a higher gear, but given two weeks they'd almost not even notice it. Crazy high gears like dura-ace cassettes on 34t front rings are beyond most people's abilities or wants, but 36t caseettes with 32 or 30t front rings is good for most everything, and those that claim it's "not possible" to ride their terrain without a 20t front ring would be surprised what they can do given a couple weeks to adapt.
    Yep-1x10 really doesn't limit you unless you have any sort of complication (knee surgery comes to mind). I'll loose traction up a steep hill before I'll loose power. I run 34t up front with 11x36.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    What crank is the 28t setup?

    Thx.
    I have a 28T narrow wide mounted in the 64BCD spot (granny).

    AFAIK the only people who make what I have is Absolute Black. If there's other options I would love to hear it.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by borabora View Post
    I think that most people can get used to tougher gearing after some time. Remember, that you end up doing the same work (putting out the same wattage) when you ascend at a given speed independent of gearing. Easier gearing doesn't add some magical motor, it just changes how your motor operates.

    I'm sorry but that makes absolutely no sense. If I weigh 200lbs. and I have 12ft. bar with a fulcrum at 10ft. from one end and 2ft. from the other, I can lift a 1000lbs. but no more. Gear ratios simply provide mechanical advantage. The higher the mechanical advantage the more leverage you have. It is easier to climb in a lower ratio than a higher. Have you never been on an unfamiliar trail when you suddenly find yourself having to climb in a fairly high ratio and you simply can not turn the cranks.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

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