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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
    I'm sorry but that makes absolutely no sense. If I weigh 200lbs. and I have 12ft. bar with a fulcrum at 10ft. from one end and 2ft. from the other, I can lift a 1000lbs. but no more. Gear ratios simply provide mechanical advantage. The higher the mechanical advantage the more leverage you have. It is easier to climb in a lower ratio than a higher. Have you never been on an unfamiliar trail when you suddenly find yourself having to climb in a fairly high ratio and you simply can not turn the cranks.
    I have to agree. I just went from 30T to 28T and set a bunch of PRs on climbs on my first ride with it

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
    I'm sorry but that makes absolutely no sense. If I weigh 200lbs. and I have 12ft. bar with a fulcrum at 10ft. from one end and 2ft. from the other, I can lift a 1000lbs. but no more. Gear ratios simply provide mechanical advantage. The higher the mechanical advantage the more leverage you have. It is easier to climb in a lower ratio than a higher. Have you never been on an unfamiliar trail when you suddenly find yourself having to climb in a fairly high ratio and you simply can not turn the cranks.
    I am not claiming that ANY gearing will work for anyone but that most people can get used to dealing with harder gearing than your average double or triple. Your analogy of a fulcrum while correct does not directly apply to reasonable gear ratios:

    1) Even if your ring:cog ratio is 1:1 you can generate sufficient force by just standing on the pedal to ascend a 30% incline.

    2) A rider is not limited to producing only the force due to his weight since he can use the other foot (if clipped in) and the bar to produce counter-force. Otherwise the sprinters we watch during the TdF putting out 1500+ Watt would not be able to do what they do.

    3) Most accomplished single speeders use a ring:cog ratio of around 2:1 and have no problem climbing. (Though, sometimes I don't know how they can do it.)

    Sure I find myself in the wrong gear and struggling on a sudden incline but it's most likely because I am not able to produce the necessary force to turn the crank not because physics prevents me from doing so. But, yes, if I am in the 11t cog I may run into the physics limitation.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    I have to agree. I just went from 30T to 28T and set a bunch of PRs on climbs on my first ride with it
    No one claimed that harder gearing will necessarily make you faster. It may or may not. Just discussing how some people like 1x10 not just because it simplifies things but also because it's harder. And, that most people can get used to the harder gearing.

  4. #29
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    ^^^Agree that there is a mental block for many folks to try 1x10...the security blanket of the granny is hard to let go but once you do it, you may find that it wasn't as bad as you had thought.
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  5. #30
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    Because when you think about it, it requires the SAME amount of energy to get to the top of the hill. If your body can adapt (and it usually can), you will find yourself doing it.
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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrick2cents View Post
    Yep-1x10 really doesn't limit you unless you have any sort of complication (knee surgery comes to mind). I'll loose traction up a steep hill before I'll loose power. I run 34t up front with 11x36.
    Good example of this on snowbikes this last winter. There are hills that you get to that no one can climb, due to the conditions. I lost traction with a 1x setup at the exact same spot the 2x people did.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
    I'm sorry but that makes absolutely no sense. If I weigh 200lbs. and I have 12ft. bar with a fulcrum at 10ft. from one end and 2ft. from the other, I can lift a 1000lbs. but no more. Gear ratios simply provide mechanical advantage. The higher the mechanical advantage the more leverage you have. It is easier to climb in a lower ratio than a higher. Have you never been on an unfamiliar trail when you suddenly find yourself having to climb in a fairly high ratio and you simply can not turn the cranks.
    It IS easier to climb in a lower ratio but given time your body will adapt to working with the higher ratios and will seem less difficult over time. But there IS a physical limit to it though and i know i ride very differently if i take my 1x9 bike VS my 2x10 geared bike, i know i will have a tougher time going uphill so i usually go a bit slower paced on the flats than if i had a granny, on the other hand i usually climb faster on the uphills with the 1x9 bike. It's not that i cannot climb as faster with the 2x10, the same ratios are there, but it's that psychological clutch of having a granny, it makes you want to use it and that usually ruins everything.
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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielsilva View Post
    It IS easier to climb in a lower ratio but given time your body will adapt to working with the higher ratios and will seem less difficult over time. But there IS a physical limit to it though and i know i ride very differently if i take my 1x9 bike VS my 2x10 geared bike, i know i will have a tougher time going uphill so i usually go a bit slower paced on the flats than if i had a granny, on the other hand i usually climb faster on the uphills with the 1x9 bike. It's not that i cannot climb as faster with the 2x10, the same ratios are there, but it's that psychological clutch of having a granny, it makes you want to use it and that usually ruins everything.
    Similar concept--let's say right now you bench 225 and someone else is telling you it's a mental block to bench 315. Eventually you could get there, but do you WANT to? Do you NEED to?

    Hell, the last time I went for a max effort I benched 405 and deadlifted 550lbs and I STILL feel the need for a 28T chainring. I realize that weights and cycling are very different, I'm just using it as an example that I have adapted to being strong and I'm not some weakling.

    It could be the trails I ride but it's just not fun for me to get so exhausted by the time I get to the top (or have to take breaks on the way up/walk it) that I need to stop for a few minutes for the way down to be fun.

  9. #34
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    1 x 10

    I wonder how many 1x riders have spent a lot of time on a single speed . After a couple of years on a single speed a 1x setup is a luxury.


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  10. #35
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    I just recently went 1x10, 32 tooth race face narrow wide front. I do a lot of climbing so granny is usually a wonderful gal to me. So I bought a wolf tooth 42 tooth bail-out gear for my cassette. Compared to the usuall 24frontx11-36rear you lose a gear or 2, but not bad overall. I just tackled a long and difficult climb yesterday. The anodized blue and green colors do add some power and speed.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Similar concept--let's say right now you bench 225 and someone else is telling you it's a mental block to bench 315. Eventually you could get there, but do you WANT to? Do you NEED to?

    Hell, the last time I went for a max effort I benched 405 and deadlifted 550lbs and I STILL feel the need for a 28T chainring. I realize that weights and cycling are very different, I'm just using it as an example that I have adapted to being strong and I'm not some weakling.

    It could be the trails I ride but it's just not fun for me to get so exhausted by the time I get to the top (or have to take breaks on the way up/walk it) that I need to stop for a few minutes for the way down to be fun.
    But thats the point we're making here, some people like it some people don't but you don't have to get exhausted just because you're riding that way, like i said in the previous post, i just ride differently and take into account the limitations of riding 1x9 and don't get more or less exhausted riding either setup.
    Of course, if you're living in the middle of the Alps you might have a different opinion.
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  12. #37
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    This thread is confusing. lol

    I ride steep mountains in WV/VA with 1X11 just as a did with 3X. The gear ratio is about the same....Same granny with 28t front ring.

    And I certainly can climb easier and longer with lower gearing.

    I rode the same trails with a 32t ring and had to bail on a few of the really steep climbs.

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