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Thread: Choices?

  1. #1
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    Choices?

    I guys, I haven't searched, mainly because I figure these are fairly new bikes and not all of these are compared to one another.

    I tried comparing these bikes to one another on Gary Fisher's website, but I have no idea what the hell the differences are. So if some of you could explain more clearly for a beginner to this techno-talk it would be much appreciated, or even better put in your recommendations to which bike you like more and explain why.

    The bikes I am in great consideration, mainly because of budget purposes are as follows:
    Wahoo disc
    Utopia
    Tassajara
    Montare
    Cobia

    Thanks guys! Much appreciated!

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    Wahoo & Tassajara are mountain bikes with different component levels. I believe the frames are the same, just the parts are different. The Tass is higher in the line, and should have more expensive parts, a better performing fork, etc.

    Cobia is a 29er model. It'll have larger wheels and tires. It's the second from the bottom in a line of four, 29er hardtails.

    Montare is a hybrid bike. It's a bike-path bike. Nothing wrong w/it, but it's the wrong choice if you are after a full-on mountain bike.

    Offhand, I don't recall the Utopia. I mean, I don't recall what the target market is for that model.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    Wahoo & Tassajara are mountain bikes with different component levels. I believe the frames are the same, just the parts are different. The Tass is higher in the line, and should have more expensive parts, a better performing fork, etc.

    Cobia is a 29er model. It'll have larger wheels and tires. It's the second from the bottom in a line of four, 29er hardtails.

    Montare is a hybrid bike. It's a bike-path bike. Nothing wrong w/it, but it's the wrong choice if you are after a full-on mountain bike.

    Offhand, I don't recall the Utopia. I mean, I don't recall what the target market is for that model.
    That helps, sounds like the wahoo disc and tassajara are the better mountain bike choice then. Wahoo disc being cheaper, so you get what you pay for in products, and the tassajara being more expensive has better add ons. cool beans.

    any others want to chime in?

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    I am now looking at the marlin disc, which has the same components basically as the tassajara for a lesser price. what do you guys think?

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    Very similar components, yes. Two things leap out at me from the specs:

    1) The Tass has hydro brakes.

    2) The Tass gets an air fork, which lets you adjust the preload to more closely match your weight than does the spring fork on the Marlin.

    I sure do like the Chili Red color of the Marlin better though.

    Either bike is reasonable for the money. If your budget allows, you probably do get your money's worth by spending up to the Tass, OTOH, there's nothing about the Marlin that would cause me to suggest not buying it. It's a nice bike.

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    the tassajara would be a better choice, just a little more expensive. don't know if i want hydro brakes though, don't think it'll matter for me. i'm use to the rubber brake system.

    doesn't the marlin have a way to adjust the preload on the front fork so that the ride isn't so bouncy while climbing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithownium
    doesn't the marlin have a way to adjust the preload on the front fork so that the ride isn't so bouncy while climbing?
    There might be a dial that essentially tightens up the spring a bit. But the range of adjustment won't be anywhere's near what you get with an air fork.

    With a coil fork, if your weight isn't a close match for the spring that's in the fork, you have to order a new spring and pay a shop to install it. With an air fork, you can adjust the air pressure to accommodate a very wide range of weights.

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    My LBS has some 2011s in already and slim pickins on the remaining 2010s. If you are doing research solely from the fisher website, you may want to check to see if shops nearby have any of the 2010 bikes you're considering in stock. You may be able to catch a great end of season deal on a better spec bike.

    Why are you not further considering the Cobia? It is a mountain bike and it's specced out pretty nicely. 29" wheels are not everyone's cup of tea but do have some benefits. Fisher 29ers handle pretty well I find.

    With that in mind, when you run into the 2011s, keep in mind that the specs changed for a lot of the bikes (Fisher collection from Trek). The 2011 Marlin got bigger wheels and major component downgrades and is now the bottom of the line 29er. The 2011 Wahoo doesn't come in a non-disc version, and has hydro brakes. The 2011 Cobia got a fork upgrade and hydro brakes. In spite of the upgrades, the msrp on the wahoo and cobia is actually lower than it was in 2010 by as much as $170 in the Cobia's case.
    The Tass isn't even in the new lineup.

    If I was looking and could find one, I'd probably go for 2011 Cobia or a 2010 Tass right off the bat. I found myself upgrading my Wahoo disc soon after I got it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    There might be a dial that essentially tightens up the spring a bit. But the range of adjustment won't be anywhere's near what you get with an air fork.

    With a coil fork, if your weight isn't a close match for the spring that's in the fork, you have to order a new spring and pay a shop to install it. With an air fork, you can adjust the air pressure to accommodate a very wide range of weights.
    since i'm the only rider though, what would be the use of the various adjustments to the air fork then? riding comfort such as downhill or climbing?

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    thanks for the help guys.

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