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  1. #1
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    WTF is Vera Tera?

    MY Nevada 1.6 29er has this garbage.

    My rim bent recently going over normal humps on asphalt. Can't even hold my 250 pound body weight.

    I googled it and nothing to be found.

    I concluded TREK has to be a much better brand since they use a bontragger.

  2. #2
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    I have vera tera rims on my Fuji and there holding up superbly. I hit rocks and stumps all the time. That being said I know faulty stuff can happen and Bontragger is not exempt. Also in a lot of cases you pay more for a trek with less features or lower level components. but to each there own.
    Love my FUJI!!!

  3. #3
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    I have a 2013 Fuji Nevada 1.3 and the rims are holding up pretty fine on my bike have you tried contacting fuji?

  4. #4
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    12-15 miles of trail riding at Alafia and my rims held up!

  5. #5
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    Did another 13 miles at trout creek Sunday rims and tires held up great!

  6. #6
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    Re: WTF is Vera Tera?

    Quote Originally Posted by john5220 View Post
    MY Nevada 1.6 29er has this garbage.

    My rim bent recently going over normal humps on asphalt. Can't even hold my 250 pound body weight.

    I googled it and nothing to be found.

    I concluded TREK has to be a much better brand since they use a bontragger.
    If the rim bent, either there is not enough air in the tires, or the spokes were not properly tensioned. The strength of the rim begins with the spokes.

    Bontrager is Trek's brand, that's why Trek has it all over their bikes.

  7. #7
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    Re: WTF is Vera Tera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gibbsinator View Post
    If the rim bent, either there is not enough air in the tires, or the spokes were not properly tensioned. The strength of the rim begins with the spokes.

    Bontrager is Trek's brand, that's why Trek has it all over their bikes.
    Well said sir!

  8. #8
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    This thread is old, but it needs a dose of honesty applied to it.
    250 lbs is a lot for a bicycle rider. If you think you can put that kind of weight on any bike and then ride it like a madman, you are going to go through a lot of rims. What can you do with the wheels to minimize damage? 1. 36 spokes or more. More spokes make stronger wheels. Even if you have to get a new hub, get 36 spokes. If you can find a 40 spoke hub to fit the bike, the Velocity rims mentioned below come in 40 hole drillings. 40 spokes is getting into tandem range, but so is your weight. 2. Make sure spokes are well, and evenly tensioned. This is important. Don't skimp on it. If you don't know how to do it yourself, pay someone who does know. 3. Use fat tires with proper pressure. The Nevada apparently comes with 2.1 inch tires. Find a good 2.5 inch tire. Pump them up until, when you put your full weight on the bike, both front and back compress about 15%, not more. (At low deflections like this, the bulging out is similar to the compression, so look for a 15% bulge when you put your weight on. For a 2.5" tire, that's a total of 3/8 inch, or 3/16, 4.5 mm each side.) 4. Try a solid rim such as a Velocity Atlas, NoBS or Cliffhanger. Don't be concerning yourself with a few grams on the rim weight. You have more than a few to lose yourself. 5. Unless you are 7 feet tall, you need to loose weight. Your BMI is well over 25. Diabetes, heart disease and kidney failure are a lot bigger worries than bent rims. 6.There are some good custom wheel builders out there. At 250 lbs and hard on rims, you might want to try one. Message me if you want a couple of good names.
    Last edited by 7802mark; 12-13-2014 at 05:44 PM.

  9. #9
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    I need to add to my previous. I did not emphasize the importance of spoke tension enough. A very heavy rider causes spoke tension to fall near to zero as each spoke passes through the load affected zone at the bottom of the wheel. Very low, or no, spoke tension is a sure fire way to get rim failure. Factory built wheels often have low and inconsistent spoke tension. (Some factory wheels have been improving in this regard in recent years, probably a result of the Holland machines.) To avoid this a heavy rider needs wheels built to higher than normal tension. 120 kgf might be a good target in front. The rear wheel is more problematic, because of dish. Drive side tension for a heavy rider might need to be 140 kgf to keep non-drive side tension up. Another trick, used alongside high tension, is to use non-butted 14 ga spokes on the drive side and butted, 14-15-14 ga spokes on the non-drive side. The rationale for this isn't quite straightforward, but is supported by experts. It has to do with keeping the spokes tensioned as the wheel is loaded.

    High tension creates a problem for the rim. Rims can fail by fatigue at or near the spoke holes. High spoke tension makes this more likely. The most sure fire prevention is thicker metal in the spoke bed portion of the rim. Someone contemplating a high tension wheel should contact their rim manufacturer to learn which rims have thicker spoke beds and are recommended for high tension.

    Still, spoke count shouldn't be forgotten. If you haven't got 36 or more, you are shooting yourself in the foot.

    If if your front wheel is dished, because of a disc brake, the comments about dished rear wheels apply to it, too. Replace "drive side" with "brake side".

  10. #10
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    WTF is Vera Tera?

    [QUOTE=7802mark;11706592]I need to add to my previous. I did not emphasize the importance of spoke tension enough. A very heavy rider causes spoke tension to fall near to zero as each spoke passes through the load affected zone at the bottom of the wheel. Very low, or no, spoke tension is a sure fire way to get rim failure. Factory built wheels often have low and inconsistent spoke tension. (Some factory wheels have been improving in this regard in recent years, probably a result of the Holland machines.) To avoid this a heavy rider needs wheels built to higher than normal tension. 120 kgf might be a good target in front. The rear wheel is more problematic, because of dish. Drive side tension for a heavy rider might need to be 140 kgf to keep non-drive side tension up. Another trick, used alongside high tension, is to use non-butted 14 ga spokes on the drive side and butted, 14-15-14 ga spokes on the non-drive side. The rationale for this isn't quite straightforward, but is supported by experts. It has to do with keeping the spokes tensioned as the wheel is loaded.

    High tension creates a problem for the rim. Rims can fail by fatigue at or near the spoke holes. High spoke tension makes this more likely. The most sure fire prevention is thicker metal in the spoke bed portion of the rim. Someone contemplating a high tension wheel should contact their rim manufacturer to learn which rims have thicker spoke beds and are recommended for high tension.

    Still, spoke count shouldn't be forgotten. If you haven't got 36 or more, you are shooting yourself in the foot.

    If if your front wheel is dished, because of a disc brake, the comments about dished rear wheels apply to it, too. Replace "drive side" with "brake side".[/QUOTE

    Thanks for the awesome information learned something from your post!

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