Mtbr's 2016 Winter Biking GearReviews and Roundups

FAT BIKES

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  1. #1
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    What is a brand new (10yr old) bike worth?

    I'm new here, sorry if i am posting in the wrong forum. My friends dad owned a bike shop in Johnson City, TN. About 10 years ago he had a riding accident. Fast-forward to today. We found two brand new Fuji bikes in his old shop. Brand new, but 10 years old. Still has owners manual wrapped around the forks.
    One is a Fuji Diamond Comp, the other is a Fuji Tahoe pro series. Any idea how to put a price tag on these?
    There are also (3) Haro BMX Bikes.
    I appreciate any suggestions and advice.

  2. #2
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    Look em up on bicycle blue book. From a collector standpoint, they might be worth more. Otherwise, I'd probably estimate 10-20% higher than the highest value. Old suspension parts sitting around for 10 years will need rebuilt, and the availability of repair parts will be slim. A new owner would probably end up needing to replace the shock and fork.
    2005 Fuji Diamond Comp - New and Used Bike Value
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the link. I didn't know there was a blue book for bikes.

  4. #4
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    Man - I'm just mulling this over for the fun of it: bike technology and "standards" change so drastically in 10 years!

    I was racking my brain, trying to think whether there was any 10-year period that saw less change (and less depreciation of value) than other decades. Maybe 1997-2007 (just before 29ers took off). There was still a lot of innovation and change, but maybe fewer and less drastic than the 2005-2015 decade. For example, a top-line, unused, 1997 S-Works Stumpjumper still would have been worth something in 2007 - in 2007, I don't think 29" wheels were quite yet seen as an established norm/necessity, and the 1-1/8" headset standard remained, which meant you could swap a more modern fork onto the thing.

    Any other thoughts? Maybe the 1985-1995 era! 2005-2015 was definitely a "doozey".

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by namdoogttam View Post
    Man - I'm just mulling this over for the fun of it: bike technology and "standards" change so drastically in 10 years!

    I was racking my brain, trying to think whether there was any 10-year period that saw less change (and less depreciation of value) than other decades. Maybe 1997-2007 (just before 29ers took off). There was still a lot of innovation and change, but maybe fewer and less drastic than the 2005-2015 decade. For example, a top-line, unused, 1997 S-Works Stumpjumper still would have been worth something in 2007 - in 2007, I don't think 29" wheels were quite yet seen as an established norm/necessity, and the 1-1/8" headset standard remained, which meant you could swap a more modern fork onto the thing.

    Any other thoughts? Maybe the 1985-1995 era! 2005-2015 was definitely a "doozey".
    Well, if you consider road bikes "bikes", mainstream road racing bikes were virtually unchanged from about 1965 until about 1985. The only thing that changed in that period was the addition of one cog to the freewheel, from five to six, but since everything was friction shifted, all that meant was screwing on a new freewheel and making some minor adjustments. 99% of road racing bikes in that era were lugged double butted chrome moly steel (either Reynolds or Columbus) built in the traditional diamond style, equipped with Campagnolo Record components, Cinelli bar/stem, Regina freewheel and chain, tubular rims (almost all were just a couple of models of Mavic or Super Champion rims) laced three cross to a Campy hub with 32 spokes. There were about three brands of tires - Continental, Vittoria and Clement were the most common.

    Look at pictures of Tour de France riders from that era - they might as well have been all riding the same bike for 20 years. There were a few exceptions along the way - a few French teams used French components and Alexi Grewal won the 1984 Olympics using a mix of Shimano, Sun Tour and Dia Compe stuff, but the frames were all the same with the exception of a very few oddballs. The first commercially available carbon frame was the Exxon Graftek from 1975-1979. The first common commercial aluminum racing frame was the Alan, also in the late 70's, although a few aluminum frames had been made all the way back into the 1930's. The vast, vast majority were just lugged Chrome-moly.

  6. #6
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    One of the most important lessons in selling:
    Never low-ball yourself.

    The retail on both was in the $1000-$1200 range. If you aren't in a hurry, start around $800 and work down until they sell. Be very descriptive and take lots of photos.

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