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  1. #1
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    Fuji bikes vs. comparable? Fuji any good?

    Newbie here. Have never really ridden and had this idea to start up riding.

    I'm 34 5'8" 165 lbs and plan on doing mostly trail riding with the occasional jump (3-4') and don't expect to ride more than 1x every 2 weeks (have 2 little kids).

    I have decided I want a full suspension bike and have been doing lots of research. My LBS carry Gary Fisher Sugar 4, Giant Trance 4, Trek Fuel 70, Specialized FSR XC, Cannondale Jekyll in the $1200 range.

    Now I got quot for a Fuji Diamond Pro at $1200 or Diamond Comp at $825. Both are way below the price I can find on the internet or from other LBS. Here are links for both the pro and comp specs.

    Diamond Pro

    Diamond Comp

    I also tried to upload a pdf file comparing all the bikes listed above, not sure if it worked or not until I submit.

    Any response is appreciated.

    Leon

  2. #2
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    2nd try at attachment
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  3. #3
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    Fuji?

    Leon,

    As a general rule, Fuji does not make the best mountain bikes. They may have improved in the last few years but historically, they are not a mountain bike brand.

    As for your choices you listed, those are all XC bikes and definitely not recommended for 3-4 foot jumps or drops. Enough of those drops and those XC bikes are going to start to crumble. So, its time to make a decision, would you rather go for a lighter bike and cool it on jumping or take the weight penalty and get a beefer bike with tougher components?

    Of the bikes you mentioned, I would suggest either the Giant Trace 4 or the Specialized FSR XC for trail riding. The Jekyll will give you a bit more flexibility in terms of jumps and drops and the Trek Fuel and GF Sugar are purely XC bikes.

    But more importantly, ride all those bikes and see what fits you best. Fit is always the most important thing. You're not going to ride your bike if you are uncomfortable on it...

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=SpecialK]Leon,

    As a general rule, Fuji does not make the best mountain bikes. They may have improved in the last few years but historically, they are not a mountain bike brand.

    I'm going to have to disagree with this statement & I don't own a fuji, but do see them @ my LBS, and my final 3 choices included a fuji, this as good a company as any other out there, different price ranges will give you different levels of components throughout all companies, the bike you picked are good bikes but i do agree, not for 3-4 ft drops.

  5. #5
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    Jekyll, others?

    Thanks for the replies.

    I assume to add some drops I should be looking at bikes that have at least 6" shocks?
    Like the Giant Reign? How about a SC Heckler or Yeti 575, are those made for drops?

    Are there some recommendations you can make for a cross between a XC/jump bike?

    As always price is an issue. So let's say between $750-1500.

    Thanks,
    Leon

  6. #6
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    Drops, Jumps and XC

    "I assume to add some drops I should be looking at bikes that have at least 6" shocks?
    Like the Giant Reign? How about a SC Heckler or Yeti 575, are those made for drops?"

    Its not the travel that is the main concern but the strength of the tubing and strength of the components. Pure XC bikes are made with lighter tubing and minimal gussets in order to save weight. More freeride or trail riding oriented bikes will use heavier tubing and reenforced gussets and welds to at strength. In addition, XC bikes will have lighter (thus less strong) wheel sets, cranks and suspension. You don't need travel for jumps and drops, you need strength. I do jumps and drops on my 5" travel freeride bike as well as my steel singlespeed hardtail. Its all about how you build up the bike.

    I ride a Giant AC, myself, the predecessor to the Giant Reign (albeit with a different suspension design). It handles just about everything I can dish out. The Heckler and the 575 are also strong choices.

    In terms of an XC/Jump bike you are naming an animal that doesn't exist. Jump bikes are designed to take a ton of abuse and thus are heavy and not good for XC (not to mention a pure jump bike has a geometry way to laid back for XC). XC bikes, as mentioned before, are build to be light and thus jumping them in any serious way is going to end up with broken parts (yours and the bike's).

    So now to your problem. You want a bike you can ride every day, mostly XC and abuse the heck out of? Am I right? Are you planning on racing? If not, don't worry too much about light components. Most people can't tell the difference between a 25 lb bike and a 30 lb bike anyway.

    If you want to go beefy XC bike that you can throw some drops and jumps on, go with a Jamis XLT, Specialized Enduro or a Haro XLS. Both have model variations in your price range.

    If you want to go even beefier and throw down some 5'+ drops and serious jumps, try the Kona Coiler, Giant Reign or a Haro Extreme.

    Just remember, the beefier the bike, the bigger a pain in the ass it is going to be to pedal up hill...

  7. #7
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    SpecialK

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll keep doing a little research.

    Leon

  8. #8
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    Any time

    Quote Originally Posted by LPF4
    SpecialK

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll keep doing a little research.

    Leon

    No problem, Leon, just post again if you need any further help...

  9. #9
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    Giant Reign

    Quote Originally Posted by LPF4
    Newbie here. Have never really ridden and had this idea to start up riding.

    I'm 34 5'8" 165 lbs and plan on doing mostly trail riding with the occasional jump (3-4') and don't expect to ride more than 1x every 2 weeks (have 2 little kids).

    I have decided I want a full suspension bike and have been doing lots of research. My LBS carry Gary Fisher Sugar 4, Giant Trance 4, Trek Fuel 70, Specialized FSR XC, Cannondale Jekyll in the $1200 range.

    Now I got quot for a Fuji Diamond Pro at $1200 or Diamond Comp at $825. Both are way below the price I can find on the internet or from other LBS. Here are links for both the pro and comp specs.

    Diamond Pro

    Diamond Comp

    I also tried to upload a pdf file comparing all the bikes listed above, not sure if it worked or not until I submit.

    Any response is appreciated.

    Leon
    I just came across this thread and read the responses. I agree with SpecialK that the Giant Trance and Spec. FSR-XC are probably the best trail bikes. You can do occasional jumping, but probably not consistent 3-4 ft drops. The Reign 3 is a better all-mountain bike, but will weigh a little more. If you are only looking to get one bike to do everything, then a versatile trail bike is your best bet. A bike with 5-6" travel and solid components will give you years of riding enjoyment. Have fun.
    Kokopelli Racing

    "Curb drops to flat, or curb drops to transition? There's a BIG difference there." Qfactor03

  10. #10
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    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by yangpei
    I just came across this thread and read the responses. I agree with SpecialK that the Giant Trance and Spec. FSR-XC are probably the best trail bikes. You can do occasional jumping, but probably not consistent 3-4 ft drops. The Reign 3 is a better all-mountain bike, but will weigh a little more. If you are only looking to get one bike to do everything, then a versatile trail bike is your best bet. A bike with 5-6" travel and solid components will give you years of riding enjoyment. Have fun.
    Thanks for the input, as a newbie responses are always appreciated.

  11. #11
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    Another option might be...

    Take a look at the Kona Dawg. The Dawg Matic is a 4" travel bike but all the higher levels, Dawg, Dawg Dee-Lux and Dawg Primo are 5" travel bikes. I think the Dawg lists at 1700 though. A bit out of your price range. It is a good hybred, do it all ride. The Coiler mentioned earlier is a bit more on the freeride side of the fence. Super strong frames on the Dawg series and can take the abuse or just be comfortable riding down the road. I do a lot of easy rides with my kids.
    Try to pick out anything by itself and you find it connected to the entire universe.

  12. #12
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    no one suggesting a chameleon?

    It seems you are looking mostly into fs bikes, but for a versatile and tough frame, imho you cannot beat a santa cruz chameleon. It can be changed from xc race to a jump bike by just swapping a few components, or set up with a nice 120mm fork and strong xc components could do both without swapping. Furthermore it can triple and quadruple as a slalom and dh bike with different component groups. You may not like hardtails but for the money (roughly $500 for frame), it'd be tough to find a more versatile bike. Just a thought. Check out the santa cruz forum to see how some of those guys have theirs set up (I don't have a chameleon by the way, but I know several people who do and I have ridden them quite a bit.)
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LPF4
    Newbie here. Have never really ridden and had this idea to start up riding.

    I'm 34 5'8" 165 lbs and plan on doing mostly trail riding with the occasional jump (3-4')
    Did you read about 3-4' jumps, thinking this is "the most common intermediate height to mention" or have you actually hit a 3-4' jump?

    Having never really ridden, 34 years old, 2 kids....I have serious doubts you are going to be hitting a waist-chest high kicker any time soon, especially riding 1x every two weeks. You certainly won't be landing it to flat!

    For your needs, pretty much any solid FS XC bike will do. Buy whatever feels good and comfortable to you. Fuji is a decent make, though not common. Iron Horse is also worth a look, although as a newbie I would strongly recommend you buy through your LBS, not online, as you will need their help.

    Specialized FSR? Anything Giant...2nd hand is also not a bad option, as you ride so infrequently.

  14. #14
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    Thanks for all your help!

    Thanks everyone for the recommendations on the bikes.

    Simian23 as you mentioned I don't plan on riding much (as compared to diehards), therefore I based the 3-4' jumps as something I would work up to. Maybe this is still too much for the infrequency, but I'll find out as I go (I rode bikes a lot when I was a kid, so I'm comfortable riding). Also your suggestion of a used bike was a good one. I've been looking, but its hard to find the one you want and then the right size. For the most part in San Diego I don't find may used mid or higher end bikes for sale in the Reader or Craigslist.

    Bottom line I realized I just have to do it. So I've decide to get the Diamond Comp (Full Suspension-lower end model). Good price and good fit. My thinking is that as if/when I outgrow the bike I'll move up and buy something better. I'll learn more about what I want out of mountain biking. Also price is not an issue, but sticking with it is. I work too much and play too little.

    Thanks,
    Leon

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