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  1. #1
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    your home made jigs

    Hi everyone,

    I'm starting to work on building my own jig. I was planning on something very similar to the "simplest frame jig" on instructables, but I thought some inspiration might be helpful. If you have a minute, could you show me yours?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I thought this was a great overview of jigs and fixtures...

    zip.

  3. #3
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    Frame Jig

    Here's a shot of my setup. Inputs are: BB drop, CS length, front-center, fork rake, ST angle, HT angle, and distance to the bottom of the lower head lug. Close-ups here:

    Flickr: ameade1's Photostream

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-universal-frame-jig.jpg  


  4. #4
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    Sweet.

    Zipzit, that is a good overview, its really nice to see the variations that people are coming up with.

    And Alex, your stuff looks very, very nice.

  5. #5
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    Alex, what's the weight of that structure? It looks heavy!
    May the air be filled with tires!

  6. #6
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    Blaster, I've not weighed it, but it's likely north of 100 pounds. All of the big flat parts are made from MIC6, but there's quite a bit of flat-ground steel and stainless in there as well. The fixture lays back flat on a pivot (not shown) and locks into the flat position for easier setup. It also can rotate freely in the plane of the frame for easier brazing access. Both axes of rotation are balanced, so the weight is not noticed.

    Alex
    Tools
    Last edited by alexmeade; 01-31-2012 at 02:03 PM.

  7. #7
    Let's get weird
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    Not fully complete, but I'll throw this one into the mix.

    More shots and info here


  8. #8
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    Double Post

  9. #9
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    This one I built about 10 years ago, now being used for carbon assembly. If I build another one I'd add more offset for better tacking access. I'd probably get all the parts waterjet cut from MIC6 plate as well.


  10. #10
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    Here's mine, Rexroth profiles (45x45 and 45x90) + some milled parts:


    Jig 2.0 par Edelbikes, sur Flickr

  11. #11
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    I find it interesting that for the most part people seemed to have coalesced around the plate type fixture. That is either a structure on the drive or non-drive that has bits that hold the frame offset from that.

    There are other designs such as the beam type where there is a central beam along the bottom of the frame and you build upwards (many motorcycles jigs use this) or the picture frame jig. A very common design in the past. I believe Ant bikes uses this. Also, Doug Fattic's fitting jig which work from a surface plate and Alex Meade's simple fixturing solution from a surface is also excellent.

    IMHO a solid, flat surface is a much more important thing to own initially than a dedicated frame jig.

    All fixtures have advantages and disadvantages. but for ease of construction if I had to do it over again and was working with minimal equipment I would most likely use the central beam idea or the surface plate solutions.

  12. #12
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    rocking the beam here
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-img_1094.jpg  


  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbohemian View Post
    I find it interesting that for the most part people seemed to have coalesced around the plate type fixture.
    I have no idea how many of which commercial jigs are sold, but this observations seems to correlate with my hunch that Anvil/Bringheli/Henry James might be the most popular? [/wild speculation]

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feldybikes View Post
    I have no idea how many of which commercial jigs are sold, but this observations seems to correlate with my hunch that Anvil/Bringheli/Henry James might be the most popular? [/wild speculation]
    I don't know how many jigs the others sell, but I do know that the 67th Type 3.1 Journeyman is on the proofing table now to go out tomorrow and we started selling those in May '11.
    A man must have enemies and places he is not welcome. In the end we are not only defined by our friends but those against us.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3wfab View Post
    rocking the beam here
    Ah, a two-stage differential jig. I played around with that design for a while, and was wondering when I'd see something like it. I think it's a great design for the garage/basement builder that doesn't have a lot of room.

  16. #16
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    You're spot on regarding the real estate. Super simple and with good rigidity and repeatability.


    Quote Originally Posted by dr.welby View Post
    Ah, a two-stage differential jig. I played around with that design for a while, and was wondering when I'd see something like it. I think it's a great design for the garage/basement builder that doesn't have a lot of room.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWF View Post
    I don't know how many jigs the others sell, but I do know that the 67th Type 3.1 Journeyman is on the proofing table now to go out tomorrow and we started selling those in May '11.
    I'm going to have to guess that ~100/year puts you at/near the top. [/less wild speculation]

  18. #18
    Who turned out the lights
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    I have a beam design underway, based on a fixture a friend of mine has. Nailing down a couple of small improvements, and it will be ready.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3wfab View Post
    rocking the beam here
    Do you have any shots of a frame loaded into that? Had a look on your site and didn't see any.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirk View Post
    Do you have any shots of a frame loaded into that? Had a look on your site and didn't see any.
    Here you go.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-img_1096.jpg  

    your home made jigs-img_1007.jpg  

    your home made jigs-img_1106.jpg  


  21. #21
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    3wfab,

    Slick. Looks like you have some measuring tapes glued on there, so I assume you have a spreadsheet to calculate angles and positions. And then do you use a giant protractor or and angle finder for the seat tube?

  22. #22
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    I don't know how 3wfab does his, but on mine, you draw a nice 2d drawing in CAD. I use AutoCAD at work, so I've got good access, and 2d drafting like this is pretty quick and easy. I draw the frame out as it would sit in the bike, and then you have an offset concentrically from the bottom bracket. For mine, you basically draw a line from the center of the BB to an extension line from the head tube (perpendicular). Offset that by 3" below the centerline of the BB. From there, it's really just basic geometry to get all the lengths of tubes you need.

    To do the rear triangle, you extend your "offset" line backwards past the dropouts. Draw a line from the center of the dropout perpendicular to the offset line. That tells you how far back along the fixture spine to set your dropout mount, and how far up from the spine you need to set your dummy axle holder.

    It's all actually pretty slick and pretty simple to use. It's based off of a fixture that James at Black Sheep built for Rob Pennell (Badger) several years ago. Another friend has that fixture now, and I just want to build my own to a)not have to borrow his for 2 weeks at a time and b)make a few minor improvements to have more room to get the torch into places (especially under the BB).

  23. #23
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    BikeCAD here. Use the Bicycle Machinery reference for setting HT. From there, I set the ST angle referenced off of the HT (which is 90 degrees).

    I use a digital angle finder to dial in the ST, which is actually the rear triangle.

    I build the rear first, simply because I can get over the 'hard' sometimes frustrating part of the build first.

    I've built several variations of plate style jigs and IMO, that design utilizing the 80/20 stuff is way more involved than what I want to deal with. 80/20 isn't true and a PITA for jig setup (plate style).

    I'm loving this beam style. Its really simple and 'open' to work around.

  24. #24
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    Any chance you could post some basic dimensions of this Jig? I really like the small size and simplicity.

  25. #25
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    mine

    what don't kill ya, make ya more strong.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWF View Post
    I don't know how many jigs the others sell, but I do know that the 67th Type 3.1 Journeyman is on the proofing table now to go out tomorrow and we started selling those in May '11.
    Curious how many shops are buying more than one?

  27. #27
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    Thanks to the forum for inspiration on my jig!

    Alex Meade gets the credit for the machined bits.

    Gonna build my first frame shortly, hopefully it rides straight lol!

    Scott.







  28. #28
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    Just wondering if anyone has made a DIY style chain stay notcher? I'm trying to get out of buying the Anvil jig for my 1st tig frame...

  29. #29
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    Hey;

    My first attempt at Basement Framebuilding...

    Scroll down toward the bottom of the page.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  30. #30
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    Thanks. Looks like I have some tooling to make.

  31. #31
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    Well..

    You might learn more from doing some the old fashioned way. Then, when it came time to build such a fixture, if you felt you still wanted one, you might have a better feel for how to build it. I wound't call that one extreme or unnecessary (it's very nice), but it is a bit beyond DYI.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  32. #32
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    I have access to CNC mills & lathes so building tools isn't much a problem, just a time issue.

    I do like the idea of drafting it out with autocad/solidworks and just marking and cutting the tubes down by hand might be a nice way to get things aligned and have a develop a feel for it. I have cut down the main tubes with the ever popular tubenotcher program but couldn't find anything to deal with ovalized stays, Do you have any suggestions on where I might find one?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgrano View Post
    I have cut down the main tubes with the ever popular tubenotcher program but couldn't find anything to deal with ovalized stays, Do you have any suggestions on where I might find one?
    Sorry;

    I'm not that far along The Path.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
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  34. #34
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    I was not able to fina a template for my first couple of frames so I just traced a rough line with the BB shell on the oval chainstay... made sure to cut it a little long, then filed the chainstay until the fit was perfect. Then I used that miter and made a paper template for the other chainstay and filed it until it fit. Took a little while but worked great.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgrano View Post
    Just wondering if anyone has made a DIY style chain stay notcher? I'm trying to get out of buying the Anvil jig for my 1st tig frame...
    Here's mine:

    Chainstay Jig par Edelbikes, sur Flickr

  36. #36
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    Jigs are cool, but I'm a founding member of the Cheap Bastards Club. As this is just a hobby, I seem to keep going toward simple as I get more comfortable with the build process. My miters are all done with files now, and fixturing is nothing more than V-blocks and quick clamps. Angles are derived from BikeCAD. I sometimes use a BB post, but it sucks so much heat even for tacking that I try to avoid it when I can.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-img_7838.jpg  


  37. #37
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    "Fixturing" doesn't necessarily mean elaborate tooling. It could be nothing more than a really flat surface to work off of. The ability to hold things in place in a precision manner while you work on it is fixturing in it's simplest form.
    what don't kill ya, make ya more strong.

  38. #38
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    Good job! Grt

    It's all actually pretty slick and pretty simple to use. It's based off of a fixture that James at Black Sheep built for Rob Pennell (Badger) several years ago. Another friend has that fixture now, and I just want to build my own to a)not have to borrow his for 2 weeks at a time and b)make a few minor improvements to have more room to get the torch into places (especially under the BB).

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3wfab View Post
    Here you go.



    It's ok. However, with that beam-type of design there is no way to hold the seat tube when tacking the top tube or seatstays. This isn't a problem on the other types of jigs based on surface plates.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by bee View Post
    It's ok. However, with that beam-type of design there is no way to hold the seat tube when tacking the top tube or seatstays. This isn't a problem on the other types of jigs based on surface plates.
    True... in theory;

    I hope he will not mind, but I have spoken to 3wfab a number of times regarding his jig journey, and based on his very practical and lucid responses have decided to head in this direction myself. He has already gone through both the "picture frame" and "surface plate" styles of 8020 jigs, and found that the inconsistencies in the material coupled with the difficulty in setting the hard points correctly, made them far less ideal than you might imagine in just looking at one. If your jig is not true to start with due to material tolerance issues, then being able to fix the ST to a crooked jig is of no benefit. Adopting a more modular build by doing the usual ST-to-BB Shell first, and then building the rear triangle in separate jigging offer speed and ease of set up. He then brings the rear triangle into this jig for front tube fitment. I have costed out various configurations, and this one also has the benefit of being a couple hundred dollars cheaper!

    All of these styles offer some degree of compromise, but he has found this one to be far less restrictive, more accurate, and far easier to deal with overall.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
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  41. #41
    bee
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    True... in theory;

    I hope he will not mind, but I have spoken to 3wfab a number of times regarding his jig journey, and based on his very practical and lucid responses have decided to head in this direction myself. He has already gone through both the "picture frame" and "surface plate" styles of 8020 jigs, and found that the inconsistencies in the material coupled with the difficulty in setting the hard points correctly, made them far less ideal than you might imagine in just looking at one. If your jig is not true to start with due to material tolerance issues, then being able to fix the ST to a crooked jig is of no benefit. Adopting a more modular build by doing the usual ST-to-BB Shell first, and then building the rear triangle in separate jigging offer speed and ease of set up. He then brings the rear triangle into this jig for front tube fitment. I have costed out various configurations, and this one also has the benefit of being a couple hundred dollars cheaper!

    All of these styles offer some degree of compromise, but he has found this one to be far less restrictive, more accurate, and far easier to deal with overall.


    The beam type jig that we are talking about has, IMO, far more downsides than the other types of jigs. The number one advantage is that it is lightweight and saves space compared to the other jigs. This advantage is really minimized when you consider that it is essential to have an alignment table especially when using this jig. Tacking the top tube/seat tube junction and the top tube/seatstays junction will go much farther out of alignment than a jig that holds those pieces in place while tacking.

  42. #42
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    In reality, where most if not almost every one welds their bikes out of a jig (not to introduce the whole 'built in stress debate') , an alignment table is only smart, and certainly is needed with any jig style assuming you care and want to measure yourself/techniques. Funny thing, with the beam style jig I am using now, I am always in the .020 range for my ST alignment.

    For me, it doesn't get much better than that. You can go loopy chasing numbers and for most builders, achieving less than .039 is acceptable. Measure some off the shelf bikes and then write home to mom.

    Technique, not tooling my friends. That's where I want to be dialed.

    As far as 'downsides'.....I believe the opposite. The beam preforms. I happen to know of a builder with multiple national championships frames that rocks the beam as well.

    Beam me up Scotty-




    Quote Originally Posted by bee View Post
    The beam type jig that we are talking about has, IMO, far more downsides than the other types of jigs. The number one advantage is that it is lightweight and saves space compared to the other jigs. This advantage is really minimized when you consider that it is essential to have an alignment table especially when using this jig. Tacking the top tube/seat tube junction and the top tube/seatstays junction will go much farther out of alignment than a jig that holds those pieces in place while tacking.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by bee View Post
    when you consider that it is essential to have an alignment table especially when using this jig. Tacking the top tube/seat tube junction and the top tube/seatstays junction will go much farther out of alignment than a jig that holds those pieces in place while tacking.
    It is ALWAYS essential to have a surface plate.....always, doesn't matter what jig you have. I can work jig-less. I can't work without a flat surface.

    I can't agree with the rest either. Tacking correctly with proper heat control (be it TIG or brazing) holds your alignment. Not a jig.

  44. #44
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    Well;

    This is the extent of my jig, and my first frame, so far. A ways to go yet,
    but there is much learning to do along the way, and the journey worth
    taking is taken in its own time.



    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  45. #45
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    80/20 users, Metric extrusions or Fractional? It seems there are more fractional components available.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracked Headtube View Post
    80/20 users, Metric extrusions or Fractional? It seems there are more fractional components available.
    Made with fractional know real reason it's just what I picked!!
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

    MR. 36er TROLL

    I'm sorry what part of "BIGLY" didn't you understand?

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracked Headtube View Post
    80/20 users, Metric extrusions or Fractional? It seems there are more fractional components available.
    I use fractional, only because the first pieces I got were from work and they don't speak metric there.

  48. #48
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    Thanks, I figured as much. Did anyone use the Autocad plug-in to build their fixture fix then send off a bill of materials. seem like the easiest, most straight forward method. I'm looking for a friend with Autocad to 'borrow' the program for this.

  49. #49
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    Hey everyone. I finally finished mine. Here it is:

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by adarn View Post
    Hey everyone. I finally finished mine. Here it is:
    What's that extrusion?

  51. #51
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    I made three (Mediocre) frames with it.


    And then I set it as a "Sculpture" at my bike shop.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr.welby View Post
    What's that extrusion?
    It's actually channel, for big glass windows and storefronts. I can post more pictures if you're interested.

    My parents run a glass shop, so I got it all for free, which was pretty nice.

  53. #53
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    After building frame #1 I was planning on following the sound advise of acquiring a surface plate for #2. Well it turns out that kind of thing is hard to find. On the other hand, 80/20 has pretty much their entire catalog on eBay. Between the eBay store and the local "strange" hardware store I was able to cobble together a Jig for about 300.00. In retrospect I could have saved some here and there, but don't regret the money spent.

    I choose not to use any of the plate style pivots, instead using a bunch of 90deg angle joints. It just seemed like that would better retain the accuracy of the extrusions. It's a pain to set up, lots of measuring and fiddling with a digital angle finder. But at the pace I plan on building, not harming the accuracy of the jig is more valuable than being able to change things quickly.


    Jigloaded by G&J AMES, on Flickr

    The dropout mount was built with an Anvil dummy axle in mind from the start. That dummy axle alone probably has 25% of the credit for frame #2 coming out straighter than #1. I actually set the jig from the axle forward. It has the most variability of all the mounting points so I set them as square as possible and adjusted everything else off of that.


    rearjig by G&J AMES, on Flickr

    The BB post, seat tube, and head tube mounts were made with some luck at the hardware store. Turns out 3/4" drive sockets can become off the shelf centering cones.

    7/8ths impact is pretty close to 27mm


    stpost by G&J AMES, on Flickrv

    19mm pretty good for the BB, I also made a fixture to locate the direct mount front derailleur post that bolts up to the BB post.


    bbpost by G&J AMES, on Flickr

    1 3/8" for the 44mm Paragon ht


    44htpost by G&J AMES, on Flickr
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  54. #54
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    Super cool, G-reg, that looks awesome!

  55. #55
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    Very Resourceful, G-reg;

    There is an undeniable elegance in such resourcefulness!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  56. #56
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    Nothing revolutionary here...

    Finally scraped the cash to buy my extrusions and hardware. Just put it together this
    week and found a home for all the fixturing I've been making/assembling for months. I can
    anticipate it might be a bit tedious to set up, but the versatility & conformability should be
    extreme.











    Last edited by TrailMaker; 12-04-2013 at 04:26 AM.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  57. #57
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    Looks great! This is an awesome thread - as someone who is more interested in the bicycle side of things (so I tend to be lame and just buy my tools instead of making them) I find these projects fascinating. Great stuff!

    -Walt

  58. #58
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    Very nice TM. I thought about building from the headtube back, talked myself out of it for some reason. Excellent access to everything with the main structure below vs on the side.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  59. #59
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    Thanks Gents;

    I am definitely a 3wfab acolyte on the beam jig thing. Having studied all of this here for months, and having more than a fair bit of tangential fab experience, this set up made a lot of sense to me for many different reasons. Talking to 3wfab privately, and Mr. Bohm's comments here in reference to the efficacy of same, cemented the deal. It is a bit of a mind bend to wade through the in-depth design phase of a bike frame, and then shift your brain to think of the bike in terms of the HT being vertical, but it does offer simplicity that cannot be overlooked.

    Another deviation that 3wfab makes in building is doing the rear triangle first. Since it is the most rigorous area, and takes the most concentration, it makes some sense to me to get it out of the way and "coast" through the front triangle to a glorious finish. In that light, the lack of ST stabilization inherent in this jig layout would seem to be minimized.

    We'll see, and fairly shortly I hope!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  60. #60
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    So you're going to do the seat tube - bb join out of the jig, then clamp that assembly in place in the jig and build the rear triangle?

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaquesN View Post
    So you're going to do the seat tube - bb join out of the jig, then clamp that assembly in place in the jig and build the rear triangle?
    Hey;



    I have another fixture (above) to bolt to the deck for centering the ST to the BB housing for
    tacking. I'll miter the stays in my stay fixture (the axle holder here bolts to that as well), then
    transfer everything over to the main jig for positioning and tacking of the stays.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  62. #62
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    Ron Sutphin's BB tacking jig is something I've wanted to make for myself for many years:


    UBI Day 4 by Ronsta36, on Flickr

    (Not my pic.)

  63. #63
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    Hmmm...

    It certainly would not be that hard to make such a fixture. I'd be curious if he sees a reduction in deflection using that device over something conventional like mine.

    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  64. #64
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    I have to say that this thread is very informative, especially those few last posts.
    Hopefully I can show my jigs soon.

  65. #65
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    Hey;

    People have wondered about the accuracy attainable with these erector set jigs. Mr. Bohm's comments about the importance of good technique over fancy equipment should resonate loudly. It certainly did in dispelling doubt of the potential of these jigs to yield good results. The last pics I posted of my ST-to-BB housing setup are a good illustration. While I do not possess a learned hand when it comes to the specifics of this bike building thing, I was able to set up this sub-assembly using nothing more than a machinist's square, tack it, and achieve a .012" (0.30mm) deviation from one end to the other.

    Lucky or good, it worked very nicely.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  66. #66
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    When I set out to build a jig about a year and a half ago I had started on a much nicer machined aluminum one but ran into issues on various fronts. that one may become some sort of mitering fixture or fork fixture. Whipped this one up on the fly from all scrap, I have $0 into the framing, $40 something into the cones, and $20 into the BB fixture. 2x2x.125 as the frame and arms, 2x1/2 cold rolled for the sliders, 3/8-16 hardware. probably have 16 hours in it as it sits and to make another one would take me probably 6 due to no head scratching. I checked the tubes with machinist straight edge and they are pretty straight, but not very square. so I relied on the tubes straightness along one edge to make everything plane out. perfect? no. I just wanted to get away from building a spaceship with tweazers and just finish something to keep moving forward. the arms plane out very closely in various positions when projected out to the ends of two 6' levels. the sliders are all tight to a machinists square. I work in a shop with no precision tools save a sloppy grizzly mill drill and some machinist squares and dial calipers so I make do with what I can. the head tube cones were bought from ebay and the seat tube cone is a brass plumbing part I chucked into a mill and machined to a cone. it will be replaced. the bottom bracket fixture is an old steel loose ball cup that I welded to some plate, threaded into a paragon bb shell, chucked that into a lathe, and faced the plate. it has various spacers to get the shell to centerline on the jig, the centerline of the main frame is the centerline of the bike based on the head tube and seat tube locations. I will add additional pieces to make angle adjustment independent of horizontal and vertical. also a chainstay fixture, dummy axles, reference front axle, rule tape on the frame, measurement register points and some tweaking as necessary. this project is an experiment and an excersize to understand framebuilding mainly. will have to do some tweaking.
    sorry for the crappy pics.









    Last edited by sonic reducer; 08-16-2012 at 01:36 AM.

  67. #67
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    Holy Crapoly;

    That's some seriously nice scrap you have access to there! Gotta be $200-300 worth of steel easy. I'd certainly hate to try an move it! No reason it should not have the potential to work as well as any other home made rig.

    So... when's the bike coming?
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Holy Crapoly;

    That's some seriously nice scrap you have access to there! Gotta be $200-300 worth of steel easy. I'd certainly hate to try an move it! No reason it should not have the potential to work as well as any other home made rig.

    So... when's the bike coming?
    It sucks to move. 100 lbs easy. The steel is just drops and nothing i wouldnt give away to a good cause, i have tons of 5' and under.
    Frame is coming when the rain comes back. The sun is out right now and in the pnw you have to get while the getting's good.

  69. #69
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    One persons rubbish becomes another persons treasure

    I ran out of MDF to back board and jig my builds, the kitchen joiner next door to me closed down. I had a couple of leftover Diamond drill rig parts sitting in a corner at my day job and recently a Diamond driller wore out his rig and was going to dump it. I saw the potential...

    Apart from having a worn trolley, which took a little longer to recondition so it would align properly, this cost the paltry sum of $32-00 to get to a frame build stage. I do need to refine a couple of things, but I will do these as I progress on frame builds. I can do both frame and forks off this workstation. It will give me easy access to the frame from all angles.

    I had intended to have a portable jig so I could stow it away, but it ended up a bit of a monster. Thought I would share the result as a way to inspire variations and options that can present themselves.

    Eric
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-img_0248.jpg  

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    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  70. #70
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    Some nice setups

  71. #71
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    I am sorry but none of you have home made jigs.
    You all have professional jigs.

    I have a home made jig:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-jig-table-3.jpg  

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  72. #72
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    This jig is for alignment of the front 2/3 of the coupled carbon fiber tandem bike I am building - my first frame. It is made of wood blocks aligned on the tube axis using a leveling laser.
    I'll build another jig for the rear triangle.

    CJ

  73. #73
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    This and a fork jig are my jigs.


    seat tube / bb joint jig by jimn, on Flickr

    Otherwise, all bikes are built with a somewhat flat steel table, some square tubing, nuts, bolts, and tube blocks from Paragon.

    I'm on bikes no. 12 and 13.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    I can
    anticipate it might be a bit tedious to set up, but the versatility & conformability should be
    extreme.
    Hey Trailmaker,
    First off, let me commend you a what a beautiful frame you built. I've always loved the way rolled tubes look on bikes and your fabrication skills are fantastic.

    I saw your jig setup and was hoping you'd help me out by answering a couple of questions. I've been building with a surface jig to this point but have recently started throwing together pieces to build an 8020 jig. I really like your design for its simplicity, but I'm a little confused about the setup. Any chance you'd be willing to walk us thru how you go about translating your design geometry to the jig?

  75. #75
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    Whaddaya need to know?

    All the real work is done on the computer. The actual build just follows those drawings. I
    do all my designing in CORELDraw. It works - albeit more laboriously than frame
    software. It's what I have. I also happen to have a 30" Graphtec vinyl/paper plotter that I
    use to make full size drawings that all of the tube manipulations are checked against.
    THIS is a big deal for/to me.

    - Scale dimension drawing. Starts as tinker toy tubes and morphs to this "welded" frame
    when everything is set. This is what it will look like.



    - First Build Drawing - Scale dimension drawing of the rear CS/BB. This gets built in a
    sub jig.



    - JIG drawing. Frame rotated with HT vertical and pertinent hard points measured from
    there. All the fixtures are set in the beam jig using this drawing. This is how it looks in the
    main jig.



    That's it. It's all Pure Magic from there!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  76. #76
    J_K
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    I finally have my "homemade" frame jig in use. Basic design is from Kris from 44 Bikes, I made some modifications to make it suitable for my budget. Once funds allow I will make some upgrades.




  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    - JIG drawing. Frame rotated with HT vertical and pertinent hard points measured from
    there.
    All the fixtures are set in the beam jig using this drawing. This is how it looks in the
    main jig.
    !
    This pretty much sums it up for me. I saw the stick on ruler and thought there may be some advanced geometry or voodoo involved with setting the BB drop and head tube height. I guess this is one of those cases where the simplest answer is the best one.

    thanks!

  78. #78
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    Hi guys.
    I use rattle_CAD and the jig is based on the software output.
    Everything is based on a line through the rear axle rectangular to the top-tube.
    The jig can be rotatet in the roll-stand.

    Setup sequence:
    - headtube height
    - distance seattube to headtube-axle (there is a bolt behind the seattube hollowprofile, sliding it, fasten the screw)
    - seattube angle (angular offset from headtube, hollowprofile rotates around the bolt mentioned above)
    - bbs height (sliding bbs fixture)
    - rear-axle distance to headtube-axle

    Its the same schematic as the chris king jig uses.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-miwi5_26.jpg  

    your home made jigs-miwi5_27.jpg  

    your home made jigs-miwi5_39.jpg  


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    me too,I don't know how 3wfab does his, but on mine, you draw a nice 2d drawing in CAD

  80. #80
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    This may have already been posted, but I will do it again:

    My Almost-a-Jig based on Dr. Welby's design

    To go with the free tubes: some almost jigless tooling

    I am about to dig it out of the rafters and build more frames.
    mtbtires.com
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  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3wfab View Post
    rocking the beam here
    What are the lengths that you use for the extrusions in your beam jig, 3wfab? And for someone looking at building a similar jig would you recommended that length, or go longer/shorter etc.?

  82. #82
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    24 for the vertical and 36 on the horizontal.

    You cannot put an entire frame and have the HT and dropouts fixed at this length. To do that, you would need to increase the horizontal beyond 36.

    For me, it's a non issue. I build my frame in 'sub assemblies' so I don't have the need to put the full frame in a jig.

    Hope this helps-

  83. #83
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    Thats great thanks.

    Time to get building

  84. #84
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    Here is mine. It is long enough to build a long bike on it. I made a long bike 29er with it and I think it is set up for that now.



    PS. It is for sale if you are interested.

    Matt
    mlhoppen(at)gmail(dot)com

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    Jig in work

    So after staying up all night with my newborn son I drafted up my first jig concept and figured I'd post it for any suggestions. Still need some work on the rear axle, but the assumption/hope is to use an anvil dummy axle, or potentially machine my own if I can sort out the lathe access I might have.

    Also, I think i'll beef up the rear axle pieces/braces, just doesn't seem right to me.

    Also - for those out there using the 4337 Angle plate from 8020 for the main tubes, what do you suggest for mounting to the main beam? I'm not sure i really like the current setup with the main pivot bolt and angle clamp being the only thing that keeps those in place, and have seen others that have a seperate plate between the vertical arms and the main beam - I'm assuming thats to allow the post to be moved without adjusting the angle, but curious if there was other motivation as well.

    Anyway, its a start. Plan is to model this up, as well as a Chainstay/seat stay DIY miter Jig I can use in my drill press, then start buying material and building it up.

    I have rough start on a frame, but that needs even more work. Plan on getting that model up to speed soon as I sort out my Jig materials as I'll be waiting around for those.

    One other question for you all - My design has custom cones, as I haven't had much luck sourcing any off the shelf part that could do that job. Is that correct for the most part?

    your home made jigs-slide1.jpgyour home made jigs-slide2.jpg

  86. #86
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    Caught a glimpse of this in a Santa Cruz Bikes , thought you guys here might appreciate a look-see.

    your home made jigs-santa-cruz-prototyping.jpg
    Bend, OR

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by MannaDesigns View Post
    ieces/braces, just doesn't seem right to me.

    Also - for those out there using the 4337 Angle plate from 8020 for the main tubes, what do you suggest for mounting to the main beam? I'm not sure i really like the current setup with the main pivot bolt and angle clamp being the only thing that keeps those in place, and have seen others that have a seperate plate between the vertical arms and the main beam - I'm assuming thats to allow the post to be moved without adjusting the angle, but curious if there was other motivation as well.
    You can bolt the adjustable beams directly to main beam with button head allens and t-nuts. Just drill an access hole for your allen wrench for the bottom pivoting point, and a small slot for access to the top bolt. You can keep the pivoting bolt from sliding in the t-slot by blocking it in place with a locking t-nut on each side.

    It's probably worth saying again that the Arctos jig that this style is based on was tricky in that the beams didn't pivot around a point on the mounting plate on the main beam. They actually rode in a pair of parallel arc-shaped slots that allowed the beam to pivot around a virtual pivot point - in the case of the seat beam around the centerline of the bottom bracket.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr.welby View Post
    You can bolt the adjustable beams directly to main beam with button head allens and t-nuts. Just drill an access hole for your allen wrench for the bottom pivoting point, and a small slot for access to the top bolt. You can keep the pivoting bolt from sliding in the t-slot by blocking it in place with a locking t-nut on each side.

    It's probably worth saying again that the Arctos jig that this style is based on was tricky in that the beams didn't pivot around a point on the mounting plate on the main beam. They actually rode in a pair of parallel arc-shaped slots that allowed the beam to pivot around a virtual pivot point - in the case of the seat beam around the centerline of the bottom bracket.
    Thanks for the input - I hadn't seen that arctos jig, rather I saw a similar arctos copy from 8020 from another forum post... thats REALLY helpful. I'm gonna take another look at the actual arctos jig tonight and see if can't come up with a better way of mounting the main tube supports to pivot around the centers like you mention.

    Also - good call on the locking in place suggestions, I like the ideas.

    Thanks!

  89. #89
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    For the people with jigs using cones, what are your preferences on the material?
    Stainless?
    Steel?
    Aluminium?

    I'm guessing that steel or stainless is better with the heat during tacking. Or is it not too much of an issue?

    Cheers

  90. #90
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    Josh

    I use Steel in mine, but I don't think it makes any difference between Steel or Stainless.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  91. #91
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    Mine are aluminum and they work just fine. Something harder would be better if you were doing production numbers, but for the garage builder it's good enough.

  92. #92
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    If you can't get cones, trailer hitch balls work very well. I have the ebay cones for my jig, but my first frame in the jig was with a 44mm paragon headtube and the cones were too small. I found that 1 7/8" trailer hitch balls work perfect. I got them for $5 each at the Tractor Supply store. The 1 1/2" balls should work nicely for a 36mm headtube.

  93. #93
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    Thanks for your suggestions. It sounds like you can get away with using any of the three, so I will probably just use whatever is the most easily available. I'll also keep trailer hitch balls in mind, quite a crafty solution!

  94. #94
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    My 1020 home made jig

    My jig as nothing special. It's a copy of the instructable version found here: The simplest bicycle framebuilding jig I could come up with.... The only difference is I've made it out of 1020 extrusion instead of 1530 so I figured I post my comments about that.

    The 1020 extrusion made the jig both cheaper and lighter and I feel it will be strong enough for the light duty frame building that I will be doing with it. I got the cones and "BB seats" machined at a local machine shop and the rest of the drilling and cutting was done with simple tools and paper templates and stock 8020 parts.

    I've yet to complete a full frame with it so my opinion may change but so far so good. First upgrade will be beefier rear wheel and BB axle that are currently made out of 3/8 threaded rods. I'd like to have something stiffer to ensure proper aligment. Some tape measure gluing might also happen to set up faster, but speed is really not important for my purpose. I used some plastic linear bearings to try and improve precision of the adjustments... we'll have to see if they survive the heat from brazing. I plan to only position and tack in the jig and complete the filet outside of the jig.

    Overall dimensions are 48" wide by 39" height. I'll be abel to do some XL 29er on it.

    Some pics
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails your home made jigs-p5010002.jpg  

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  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankzetank View Post
    My jig as nothing special. It's a copy of the instructable version found here: The simplest bicycle framebuilding jig I could come up with.... The only difference is I've made it out of 1020 extrusion instead of 1530 so I figured I post my comments about that.
    Cool! I've been waiting to see someone do some sort of linear bearing type mod to the design.

  96. #96
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    Not exactly "home made" But I just finished my second jig, and unlike the first, this one is straight, rigid and actually kinda nice. A professor of mine helped me build it. He built frames in the 70s and 80s and then moved into precision machining. He was an awesome resource to have and he was generous enough to let my use his shop and a lot of is knowledge.
    It came out really great and I can't wait to start building frames on it.

    your home made jigs-20130513-105207.jpg

    your home made jigs-20130513-105214.jpg

    your home made jigs-20130513-105221.jpg

    your home made jigs-20130513-105228.jpg

    your home made jigs-20130513-105234.jpg
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  97. #97
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    Brilliant set-up you have there.
    Two things I like are: angle indicators for the seat tube off the BB and the descent gap to work around the rear side of a frame. I've seen some jigs with too little room in that off-side position, but you need a solid jig back-bone to make it work. Looks like you've received some really good advice.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  98. #98
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    Very nice. How much machining time for the non 80/20 parts?

    thanks, Brian

  99. #99
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    Hey, thanks Eric! And Calstar, I'm not sure on a specific number, but it took us about
    Five 12 hour days to make. It could have been faster if I knew Gibbs or mastercam better, but it did take a LOT of work.
    -Adam Sklar
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  100. #100
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    your home made jigs-sam_1416.jpg

    that is all for now

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