• 11-15-2012
    yeti575nut
    yeti frame corrosion, any ideas or tips to remove it?
    I have a 07 yeti 575 frame that I wanted to strip and do a raw brushed aluminum finish on.
    The bike was pewter in color I believe and I removed that with aircraft stripper and at this point I'm a little lost.
    I have corrosion in and around different areas that seams etched into the aluminum.
    I took sand paper and wet sanded from 300 to 600 grade 3m paper but the etched areas remain there.
    I'm thinking about taking it to be blasted with walnut shells and at that point either leave alone or powdercoat.
    I really want to leave raw looking and I could actually have clear powdercoat applied and I could go as far as having even a cool metalflake in the clear.
    Is this my only option to actually removing the etched, oxidation areas or am i missing something?
    If you guys have any experience let me know I'm at a standstill.
    Also for less that 100 it could be blasted and powdercoated here in this area, so price isn't to bad, make me want to say screw It and let them do it.
  • 11-15-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    If you look at such corrosion on a microscopic level, you see pitting, and the corrision is down in there, living under the surface. To truly eliminate it, you must get the surface down close to the bottom of the pits. We can't know how far that is from here. You can do chemical treatments to try and neutralize the corrosion, and the shallower the pitting the more successful that will be. Still, simply burying the corrosion under paint will NOT stop the activity, but only slow it.


    I'll give you another for instance. Acid rain damage in paint. You can sand it smooth and paint over it. The acid pitting will return, ruining a perfect new finish, because the acid is still in there. You have to strip it bare and bring it back from ground zero.

    Clean it as good as you can. Remove surface as much as you dare (not much!). Leave it bare and keep it clean, or have it painted and know it will probably pop eventually.
  • 11-15-2012
    yeti575nut
    you are correct and it does look like tiny pits in the aluminum, not sure how or why it happened but im just trying to make it look the best I can.
    So Im guessing the walnut shell blasting will only do so much too, so what chemical process if any could work?
    I was thinking of going to a boat place that sells pontoons and get some aluminum cleaner that may get into those pits to neutralize the area.
    If you know any material or chemical that may do what im looking for, let me know.
    Thanks for the reply..
  • 11-15-2012
    Yogii
    When finished, paint or powder coat! Leaving it "raw" even with a clear coat, will result in the corrosion returning.
  • 11-15-2012
    ghglenn
    Chrome it. You don't see it very much, would be cool/different if it could be done.
  • 11-15-2012
    yeti575nut
    In the powdercoat I'm looking at,they have clear hard coat that you can add a metalflake to just like paint on a hot rod.
    You have that cool raw aluminum look with the protection of powdercoat and if you wish a cool flake that in sunlight looks sweet.

    I may go that way, if so pics to follow.
  • 11-15-2012
    yeti575nut
    Hey guys I also just talked with the powdercoater and he said he has a dunk tank that removes all corrosion , paint residue, and so on.
    Hes thinking that when that is done to walnut blast the frame to get the finish I desire and do the clear as we spoke of to keep that raw look I'm trying to obtain.
    Hes thinking with those processes complete we should be able to neutralize any oxidation in those pits and cover them to help eliminate the chance of them returning.
    We will see I have an apt Monday to take it in.
  • 11-15-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    It will take far more aggressive media than walnut shells to do anything down deep, as they are designed NOT to remove base metal, leaving a semi-polished sheen. I'd hit the spots with at least garnet, if not more, before the shelling. Given proper restraint, I might be inclined to leave it in the tank a tad longer than he usually does, just to give it a little extra chance to neutralize the corrosion. Hopefully it will be enough to restrain the corrosion from acting up any time soon.
  • 11-15-2012
    Yogii
    Just a clear over steel does not work very well. I don't know why clear over aluminum would be any different...
  • 11-15-2012
    yeti575nut
    I agree yogii, but if its an actual clear powdercoat that should be ok dont you think?
  • 11-15-2012
    Yogii
    Let us know how it looks in 3-5 years...
  • 11-15-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    Any finish has a couple of ways it adheres to the surface. Both are mechanical, in a sense, but can be separated into two classes; either they stick because the surface is rough and has some tooth to it, or they stick because they chemically bond to some extent. Primer will stick to metal roughened by either sanding or an acid etch wash. Paint sticks to primer because the primer surface is open and fairly soft, and the molecules like eachother quite a lot, and bond quite well; the paint soaking into the primer to some extent. In the case of a paint finish over smoothly prepared metal, there is nothing to stick to either mechanically or chemically. It is down to simple surface tension - like suction - or that the finish not be disturbed by any impact that breeches its suction grip on the surface.

    Clear over metal looks nice... for a while. Some finishes work better than others. In relative terms, it won't last, sorry to say.
  • 11-15-2012
    Yogii
    Stuff sticks because positive particles line up with negative particles...
  • 11-15-2012
    Yogii
    Quote:

    Chrome it.
    They have a "chrome" powder coat now!
  • 11-15-2012
    shiggy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by yeti575nut View Post
    Hey guys I also just talked with the powdercoater and he said he has a dunk tank that removes all corrosion , paint residue, and so on.
    Hes thinking that when that is done to walnut blast the frame to get the finish I desire and do the clear as we spoke of to keep that raw look I'm trying to obtain.
    Hes thinking with those processes complete we should be able to neutralize any oxidation in those pits and cover them to help eliminate the chance of them returning.
    We will see I have an apt Monday to take it in.

    Be careful with any stripper and blasting on a suspension frame. Either can adversely affect the pivots and bearing seats, possibly destroying the frame.
  • 11-16-2012
    yeti575nut
    4 Attachment(s)
    Well I continued to clean my frame today so here it is.
    First pic with ssv cleaner added to remove oxidation and hopefully get into the pitted areas.

    second pic a close up of the cleaning action going on.

    3rd pic, frame is clean but i didn't expect the color, check out those bright welds!!

    4th pic is completed with a light wire wheel and then some steel wool and finally a scotch bright pad.

    So now that the pits are still there I take it this is where it will oxidize again, so should I just have it powder coated?
    If I do next problem is what color??? Hummmm
  • 11-16-2012
    yeti575nut
    I meant to say JJV's not ssv's.
    This is a non chemical , natural cleaner from the boat store..
  • 11-16-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    Coatings that allow moisture and oxygen through, or finishes that have been compromised actually make it worse because the agents of corrosion are kept from drying. Exposed corrosion usually does its damage much slower than that which is covered. Exposed corrosion dries out at times, and so is somewhat less active. It might be a toss up which keeps it best; being open to drying and maintenance, or coated and hopefully sealed.

    I would wager that the corrosion started because of a breach of the original finish. It's probably pretty clean at this point. I think I would have it powder coated, with an emphasis on making sure those areas were well covered.
  • 11-16-2012
    G-reg
    Not to be a negative Nancy. But now that you're intimately familiar with your frame.... you double checked there are not any cracks around that lower suspension mount, right? Of the three 575 owners I've known two of them are on frame #2 due to warranting the first due to a crack on the weld at the seat tube/lower suspension mount.

    That said,
    The metal WILL corrode under ANY paint/powder, if just that if it's clear you can see it..

    I'd say if you can't anodize it, just leave it bare. Give it a good carnauba wax, and hit it with some Mother's Al Polish/Green Scotch brite as required.
  • 11-16-2012
    yeti575nut
    g reg looked really good to me. I have two 575 frames and my first had a crack in the upper rear shock mount where the upper tube changes direction.
    Thats how I ended up with this frame, this one is clean.
    I agree with you on the corrosion under paint /powdercoat so I may just leave it as it is.
    I will speak with the metal guy who I was talking with about powdercoat and ask him about that process of anodize the frame.
    chances are she is going to stay the way it is, I think a scotch brite now and then isnt to bad to keep it decent looking.
    with a few decals and components to match I really like that look.
    Take care.
  • 12-06-2012
    zeroviz
    I have friends who use ACF-50 on their motorcycles and rate it. Not used it personally. Salt is used to de-ice roads in the UK and takes its toll on alloy.

    Also do a search for "sharkhide metal protectant". Photos's on website look impressive.
  • 12-22-2012
    yeti575nut
    1 Attachment(s)
    Here is what I ended up doing guys, for those who wondered..

    I took it to the powder coat place near by and since the frame was so clean I had it powder coated white.
    Any of the pits were filled and turned out really nice, now the build begins...:thumbsup:

    And believe it or not , it was 30.00 to do the frame!
    Hard to even paint for that much these days..

    Later guys, merry christmas.
  • 12-23-2012
    ghglenn
    Nice, post the finished build for sure. Would love to see it when it is complete.
  • 12-23-2012
    yeti575nut
    sure will gh, I'm home this week and will do some assembly, decals, badges if time allows.
    I did get a set of forks as a gift they are a set of lightly used ( fox talas 36 100 thru 160mm, 20mm axle ) BUT the steer tube is a 1.5 and to large, wife didnt realize nor did I till I matched them to the frame since my frame is a 1 1/8 head tube, DAM !!

    I am looking into changing out the steer tube to the size I need or buy a set of parts forks to scam the triple tree and correct steerer from, I need to study more.

    If anyone who reads this has ideas , send them my way.

    Thanks again for ideas and help, im learning as I go.
  • 01-10-2013
    yeti575nut
    2 Attachment(s)
    here are a few more photos, getting near completion!! Yea Baby,,,,:thumbsup:

    how do you like my kids mess in the back ground??
    Teenagers can live with them, cant shoot them....lol