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  1. #1
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    Using Anvil main tube miter fixture for dropout miter?

    Working on a 29er with hooded dropouts. I'm working with tapered stays and wondering what people have used for mitering the dropout end of tapered stays. I was looking at my Anvil Main tube miter fixture and looks like it will clamp in fine. I have the chainstay fixture and mitering the bottom bracket end isnt a problem.
    Andy
    Blitz Cycleworks
    Green Bay, WI
    www.blitzcycleworks.com

  2. #2
    DWF
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    Yo Andy - If you go here for the MTMS you'll see one of the pics shows the very thing you're asking about:


    Horizontal Main Tube Mitering System Being Used To Miter The Small End Of a Chainstay by Anvil Bikes, on Flickr

    Or if you need to slot the small end, there's this:


    Main Tube Mitering System being used for slotting chainstays by Anvil Bikes, on Flickr

    You can see how the MTMS can hold a taper. The thing to keep in mind is that the MTMS has a minimum clamping capacity of about 14mm so make sure the small end of the stay is being held rigidly before you start your cut.

    Edit - I just double checked and you have the vertical/universal system but it has the same capability and capacity as the horizontal unit pictured.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks man!
    I thought it could be done and looked on the Flikr page for illustration earler, but didnt see it. I knew i missed something. I clamped it in this afternoon and looked like it held pretty solid but thought id ask before destroying a nice chainstay. The way the clamp is designed it holds nicely on the large and narrow end of the taper towards dropout end.

    Gotta say I'm in love with the fixtures and support of them!

    Thanks
    Andy
    Andy
    Blitz Cycleworks
    Green Bay, WI
    www.blitzcycleworks.com

  4. #4
    DWF
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    Thanks, Andy!
    A man must have enemies and places he is not welcome. In the end we are not only defined by our friends but those against us.

  5. #5
    RCP Fabrication
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    A word of advise, especially while doing this on seat stays....

    The edge of the "V" of the tube clamp WILL dent the tube depending on how much of a bend the stay has, and where the bends land. Two wraps of electrical tape will stop this from happening.

    I have gotten into the habit of wrapping every stay (it takes 2 seconds and costs almost nothing), though it's not usually necessary while mitering for a hooded dropout, the hole saw cutting down does not require the same amount of clamping force as a slotting saw pushing the tube out of the clamp (especially a tapered one, where the more it moves the less clamping force it has).

  6. #6
    DWF
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCP FAB View Post
    A word of advise, especially while doing this on seat stays....

    The edge of the "V" of the tube clamp WILL dent the tube depending on how much of a bend the stay has, and where the bends land. Two wraps of electrical tape will stop this from happening.

    I have gotten into the habit of wrapping every stay (it takes 2 seconds and costs almost nothing), though it's not usually necessary while mitering for a hooded dropout, the hole saw cutting down does not require the same amount of clamping force as a slotting saw pushing the tube out of the clamp (especially a tapered one, where the more it moves the less clamping force it has).
    Generally speaking, you always want to have the outside radius of the bend on the fixed block and the inside radius of the bend on the moving block since that is the block that's backing up the tube. The smaller the tube (less stiff) and the sharper the radius, the more important that becomes. When slotting, back up the other end of the stay with the phase indexer to keep it from being pushed out of the block. Good idea to make sure your slitting saw is sharp and you're letting the tool do the work.

    Also, as you approach the holding capacity of the blocks (which is about 14mm; it will usually hold down to 13mm but you need some margin for tube compression), the less clamping pressure you can apply before it's just one block pushing on the other.

    Also beware of tapers that are short enough to only be captured on one side of the pivot as then the block won't clamp the small end at all.
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  7. #7
    RCP Fabrication
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    Good to know! I will pay attention to that next time, I am not sure how I had it last time.

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