• 11-21-2012
    TrailMaker
    TrailMaker #2 - The Kroozer








































    -
  • 11-21-2012
    SlowSSer
    stepping out of lurk mode to say incredible! nicely done!
  • 11-21-2012
    Drew Diller
  • 11-21-2012
    Peter E
    frame #2 ? really?

    Well done!!!

    really like how you joined the chain and seat stays to the dropouts
  • 11-21-2012
    RCP FAB
    Sick. Just plain sick.
  • 11-21-2012
    dr.welby
    *** jaw -> floor ***
  • 11-21-2012
    sonic reducer
    concept A+
    details A+
    craftsmanship A+

    nicest 2nd frame ever?

    fat bike? geometry?
  • 11-21-2012
    febikes
    Very nice. From the back end and the BB shell I think it will be fat bike. What color will she be?
  • 11-21-2012
    TroyS600
    Gotta be fat, i saw a 45nrth tire leaning on the wall.

    The stays to dropouts are absolutely gorgeous! It must have taken some time but it was worth it!
  • 11-21-2012
    todwil
    DAM Trail can't wait to see it fatted out, are you making the fork? Supernice!!:thumbsup:
  • 11-21-2012
    Walt
    Niiiice!
    Kick butt! Tell us about the geometry!

    Walt
  • 11-21-2012
    golden boy
    Unreal dude. Second frame? Really? Absolutely stunning!

    I'm sick about the stay-to-dropout transition. How the hell'd you do that???
  • 11-21-2012
    Stockli Boy
    gorgeous. Nice work.
  • 11-21-2012
    wyatt79m
    Holy Crap !!! Want.
  • 11-21-2012
    G-reg
    Wow

    Ok, elaborate on the drop out joinery. TIG'd and filed?

    Needs a truss fork (no **** my phone's predictive text knew that's what I was going to say)

    Spill it on the geo #'s. I'm pleasantly surprised a how nice my new Fatty handles, so it's possible to get away from self steer / wheel flop handling.
  • 11-21-2012
    Clockwork Bikes
    Very nice finish work.

    -Joel
  • 11-22-2012
    TrailMaker


    Joinery was mitered, plated (SS's), TIG'ed, and filed, and filed... and filed, and sanded too.

    This was my first time rolling tubing. I learned where to put cable stays, I hope. I learned to be patient enough to remember vent holes. Now I am going to learn about Powder CoatING and CoatERS. I am going to learn about holing rims and building wheels, which I have never done. I'm quite hopefully going to learn that I got this one righter than the first one!

    Thank you all very much for your kind words. I feel the same way!

    Stay tuned.....
  • 11-22-2012
    FTMN
    Gorgeous...

    Maybe I'm missing it, but what's the HT angle?

    How did the actual geometry turn out compared to the plans?
  • 11-22-2012
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FTMN View Post
    Gorgeous...

    Maybe I'm missing it, but what's the HT angle? How did the actual geometry turn out compared to the plans?

    No;

    You didn't miss it. It disappeared from my drawing somehow. 70*. All I can say right now is that the HT/ST relationship is spot on. I'm almost afraid to find out the rest....
  • 11-22-2012
    Peter E
    got any photos of the build process of the stays to dropout joints?
  • 11-22-2012
    Yogii
    Sweet!

    I just hope that your legs do not scrap against the forward seat stays.....2 tone?
  • 11-22-2012
    OneBadWagon
    Wow. That is beautiful work and a great looking frame.
  • 11-26-2012
    MDEnvEngr
    Fantastic, I love the stays to dropouts. Any more pics of that specific process? B
  • 11-26-2012
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MDEnvEngr View Post
    Fantastic, I love the stays to dropouts. Any more pics of that specific process? B

    Hey;

    I did not take any specific pics of that process. All I can do is describe it.

    Where the CS-to-DO joinery was concerned, I placed the DOs on my dummy axle and in my axle fixturing tower on my CS mitering jig.



    I place the forward tab portion of the DO right above the area of the CS that would be mitered. I marked and trimmed the ends of the CSs until they cleared the tabs and then slid the dummy axle holder down to align the CS-to-DO interface. Level the DOs and stays with a height gauge. Tack. Unlike the case pictured, the CSs on the Kroozer come in behind the DO tabs, so there is nothing to do but weld it up and file/sand it smooth.

    In the case of the SSs, you can see in the pics that they are clamped in place on the DO tabs. The first step in joining them was to flat the back side of the tube, which was accomplished by placing them over a railroad spike clamped in the vice, and hammering them flat. High tech stuff! Then, the outer portion of the SS tube was trimmed flush to match the level of the DO surface with a 3" cut off and disc grinder. At this point, the face of the DO tab is relieved the thickness of the sheet metal that was used to plate over the opening in the SS, and the SS was then trimmed back further to match. The sheet metal cover plate was trimmed in the bullet shape to cover the opening in the SS. Weld, file, and sand.

    I hope that makes sense. Doing that slice & patch mitering process might be my favorite part of the build!
  • 11-26-2012
    crux
    Very nice work. Please do us a favor and post pics of completed bike.
  • 11-26-2012
    jay_ntwr
    VERY Slick! I really like SS/DO interface. Great job there and very creative.
  • 11-29-2012
    MendonCycleSmith
    Dragged me over from the fatbike forum John.

    That is just gorgeous. Well done doesn't begin to describe my thoughts.

    Wish I had you time, energy, patience, and tooling. I've built close to 30 frames at this point, but they are all hack jobs compared to this.

    Ever find yourself up my way with it, stop in, I'd love to see it in person. :thumbsup:
  • 11-30-2012
    charlichin
    Impressive piece of work.

    Congrats!

    Looking forward to see it finished.

    Cheers!!!

    Charlie War.
  • 11-30-2012
    TrailMaker
    Thanks Everyone;

    I am truly gratified by the results so far, and your consideration as well. It's the warm glow of having something really click and speak to you. I am now grappling with the cost of powder coating pitted against my aesthetic demands for the project, and getting peripheral bits ready for whatever finish ultimately awaits them. To wit;

  • 11-30-2012
    cendres
    TM, which tubing did you use for this? The overall design is absolutely stunning, but I keep returning to the photos of the stays and dropouts. Amazing.

    Build me one in ti or stainless?
  • 11-30-2012
    Meriwether
    TM-
    Stellar job!!
    I second the best 2nd frame ever.
    I'm jealous of your curvy-tubed Rotundcycle!
    I love the tape and coat hanger fixturing. Classic! Beautiful dropout/stay work.
  • 11-30-2012
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cendres View Post
    TM, which tubing did you use for this? The overall design is absolutely stunning, but I keep returning to the photos of the stays and dropouts. Amazing. Build me one in ti or stainless?

    Hey;

    Don't know nuttin bout Ti. Stainless might not be too much of a stretch, though. :D

    Boring old straight gauge .035 ChroMo. for this one. The stays are all .750. I thought if I ever built another one, I might get away with .028 x .750 for the SSs at least, and bridges/braces. Save a little weight, given the redundancy of some of the tubing here. .028 x .750 is lighter than .035 x .675, by the by... and I'd imagine it might also stronger too. Don't know, but it's an interesting thought.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Thanks Whit;

    You were very kind to take an interest in my earliest ramblings on this topic of frame building, and I'm glad you like it.

    :thumbsup:

    -
  • 11-30-2012
    TrailMaker
    COOL;

    The Big Brown Truck just paid a visit! :D

  • 11-30-2012
    cendres
    Brown Santa!

    Idea: Rather than powder, emery cloth it and clear it. The heat-affected zones look really cool.
  • 12-01-2012
    TrailMaker
    Meh;

    I'm not big on raw, really. My welds are nothing to show off either! Besides, clear won't stay on bare metal for long.

    Annoyance - I wanted to get rid of the juvenile SINZ logo on the seat clamp. Figured I'd take the lever and buff it off with a rag and some compound. Yep, buffed off, but the white powder coat is pretty thin, and I went through it! Damn. Well, nothing to lose. Tried a little carb cleaner on a rag and the same logo on the clamp body wiped right off like grease. DOUBLE Damn!

    How come you always find out what to do first second?!?! :madman:
  • 12-01-2012
    cendres
    Heh. Measure once, cut twice... :)
  • 12-02-2012
    jcaino
    Wow. I really need to learn how to weld.
  • 12-02-2012
    TrailMaker
    Another in a Series...
    Just for those that love to agonize over my "time wasting projects."



    This is my Problem Solver for my Problem Solver; taking a standard 68/73 direct mount derailleur adapter out to a 100mm Fatbike version. Why, you are doubtless asking? There are very good reasons for it.

    1) ANY project that requires making something out of metal is good in my book.

    2) Every time I do one, I learn and improve.

    3) Saved me another shipping charge. ?? :skep:

    Tried buying anything for a Fatbike lately? If you have, you already know where I am going. The Fat market is exploding so fast that you just can't find anything. If you do, you better not hesitate or it will be GONE. I had a nice little order all put together, and only needed a few $$ more to get free shipping. Ha! I'll get the FD/DM. They don't HAVE the Fat mount?!?! Out of Stock?!?! :madman:

    Ta Da. Another $10, another cardboard box, another week... or another project? Win, win, win. It's all good to me! :cool:

    -
  • 12-02-2012
    crux
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Just for those that love to agonize over my "time wasting projects."-

    What? If possible I'd rather make the part than buy if reasonably possible.

    Find it funny that you can not find anything fatbike as they are to popular. Here the LBS will not order one as they are afraid it will never sell.
  • 12-02-2012
    G-reg
    If my "machine shop" consisted of more than a harbor freight bench grinder and a dremel.... I'd look for reasons to make that kind of thing.
  • 12-02-2012
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by crux View Post
    What? If possible I'd rather make the part than buy if reasonably possible.

    I guess it depends on your frame of reference. Many here feel it is a poor use of their time, and would rather buy their bits. We obviously fill a different frame!

    Quote:

    Find it funny that you can not find anything fatbike as they are to popular. Here the LBS will not order one as they are afraid it will never sell.
    Ironic indeed. They are out of touch with their own industry. Fatbikes are the fastest growing portion of it right now. If nothing else, they should see the value in having something that draws people's attention, even if it didn't sell. The smart businessman would get one and start taking it on the weekly shop/group rides. When people experienced them, he'd be selling them regularly in very little time after that!

    Tell this shop to check out the Global Fatbike Day thread, over on the busiest forum on MTBR!
  • 12-02-2012
    mbeardsl
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Yogii View Post
    Sweet!

    I just hope that your legs do not scrap against the forward seat stays.....2 tone?

    That was my second thought (after WOW that's beautiful dropout work!!). With as wide of a BB and crank setup as he'll run for going fat it may not be an issue. I hit mine all the time on my 36er but I'm just used to it now. Only bang it hard every once in a while.
  • 12-02-2012
    G-reg
    Heel clearance might be the function behind the form. On my new Fatty using the same drops, shorter chainstays and size 12.5 Lake's I'm just barely Ok. But I offset my chainstay at the dropout outboard as much as practical. With how he finished the drops having nothing outboard of the drops themselves..... I bet TM's just fine in that regard, unless he pronates worse than I do with huge feet.
  • 12-02-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    I agonized over that very issue, to the point of actually posting a thread about how one manipulated a tube in two planes. I note that the custom Fatback Ti belt drive cruiser does not appear to have any significant manipulation of the SSs in the horizontal plane, but I never found any good pics of the rear end of it.



    I had all kinds of ideas for how to try it, but in the end I just didn't feel like potentially wasting many $$$ worth of tubing trying to find out. The thing that sealed the deal for this design was riding my current fatbike to see. My feet were FAR outboard of where those SSs were, will be far below where these arched ones will lie, I think, and it suddenly became a non issue in my mind. Sure, they will be closer than normal, and there may be more contact than normal if I get lazy, but I don't think it will be a big deal.

    I hope.

    I'm really looking forward to the new CS layout. They are straight back from the bend around the tire to the DO, and well inboard of where my first design was on the Humvee. I do have some moderate contact on it, so I'm interested to try this one out. The low mount Paragon DOs really made this all possible.
  • 12-03-2012
    Feldybikes
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post

    Curious as to why you went this route over making a braze on FD mount.

    (really like the chainstays, BTW)
  • 12-03-2012
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Feldybikes View Post
    Curious as to why you went this route over making a braze on FD mount.

    Hey;

    The rigidity of the braze on is nice, but comes at the price of adjustability. This adapter defeats some of the advantage of the direct mount, but I have had many times where giving the FD a little radial tweak was just the cure for the constant battle between chain rub in higher gears and a crisp downshift under power into lower ones.

    Anyway... amongst all the other new challenges, I added cable stays on this one. One hurdle at a time, please. :D
  • 12-07-2012
    TrailMaker
  • 12-15-2012
    FastFix
    To sick, TrailMaker! I am in awe of your fabrication skills. Also can't wait to see the pics of the finished product.
  • 12-15-2012
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FastFix View Post
    To sick, TrailMaker! I am in awe of your fabrication skills. Also can't wait to see the pics of the finished product.

    Thanks Mate;

    Me either. I'm just this close to saying screw the PCer and painting it myself! :madman:
  • 12-16-2012
    golden boy
    I rattle-canned my first and only (so far) frame. Not knowing how long the frame would last, I didn't want to spend the $$$ for a good paint job. Several hundred miles later, I kinda wish I had invested in a good paint job. Yours is a beautiful frame....please be patient!
  • 12-18-2012
    becik
    Wow !
    extremely nicely executed.


    Post somes pics of it fully built.
  • 12-18-2012
    TrailMaker
    Off for PC tomorrow!

  • 12-18-2012
    dru
    Damn man, That is some nice work. Bending work and really nice finish work Thumbs up!


  • 12-21-2012
    bikeabuser
    Insanely cool !!!
    I can hardly wait to see what the third one will be like :thumbsup:
  • 12-21-2012
    car bone
    This frame is car bone approved and gets the badass frame of the year award.
  • 12-22-2012
    TrailMaker
    Thanks Guys;

    I knew this design was going to be pretty strong when it was on the screen in front of me for months, but even I am totally impressed with it. Every time I look at it I just get that;


    unn Rock, rock, rock, rock, Go T Man, Go T Man, rock, rock, rock, rock feeling.

    At the same time as it is glowing in my heart, I am also quite afraid that I may have shot my wad toooooo early in my career, and it will be back to obscurity!

    OK, reality check. I got it back from PC yesterday. They did a nice job, but.... I wanted it two-toned, but to mask it and powder it would have been time consuming, read expensive. Well, we tried a fade. FAIL. DOINK. I should have known better than to try it, because I've done it with wet spray and it is REALLY TOUGH to get right. Powder does not necessarily go where you want it to! It is one of the most often tried and yet least successful custom looks there is, and when it is inevitably done poorly, it looks REEEEEALLY stoopid. Epic Fails at least 98% of the time it is tried. Any pro painter knows that.

    Sooooo...... :skep::rolleyes: Now I'm looking for ways to fix it without a complete redo. Yes, I knew it in the back of my mind before hand. Yes, I knew it the minute I looked at it. Yes, I should have just left it there and asked them to redo it. The only thing that I can say about them is that they should have known right away it would not fly, but that might be asking a lot of the "non-artist."

    So, more time. In the interim, I can learn how to re-lace the wheels. The drilled rims with colored strips look just utterly dope. Because this thing is going to be so incredibly awesome, the frame paint simply MUST be redone.

    Tickticktickticktick.......
  • 12-22-2012
    Clockwork Bikes
    That's really frustrating. I hate powder coating my frames just because it's so likely I'll screw it up.

    Don't let anybody strip it who doesn't know bikes. It's not that hard for a big sand blaster to put a whole in a tube. A few years ago a gentleman on the Framebuilder's list had his lugged frame powder coated and when he picked it up most of the silver had dripped out of the lugs. They wouldn't admit it but it was obvious they screwed up the first jib and burned it off, thus melting the silver.

    I've had good luck with Aircraft Remover for removing powder coat. Get some rubber gloves and wire brushes and go to town.

    -Joel
  • 12-22-2012
    G-reg
    Probably best to stick with single colors for PC.... Unless you're Spectrum. And be prepared to pay for it.
  • 12-22-2012
    MendonCycleSmith
    Perhaps let us judge how ugly it is?

    Besides, I think we all love pics of that thing anyway ;)

    Once she's covered in mud, you may not even care what it looks like.

    I don't even paint the frames I build for myself. Let them rust in peace. Costs more to do it than the tubes ran me, so why bother....

    However, you're obviously detail oriented, and knowing it isn't "just right" may make you nuts. No once can know that but you!
  • 12-22-2012
    TrailMaker
    Nope;

    This is nowhere close to fail, even, but I don't really blame them. I'm the best judge there is of what is good and what I want. I'm also very good at judging what other people want, even if they don't know themselves. After hours of talking with people about their projects and what they will be like, I just tell them, "look... I have a general idea of what you think you want, but do be aware that I am not doing this for you. I'm doing it for me. If I am merely satisfied, you will be orgasmic because I can out fuss anyone. I can be as fussy as you can afford. I've never had to redo anything yet!!

    I have an idea of how to salvage it worked out in my head. We'll see if we can pull it off. I think it is very doable. Until then, I'll content myself with lacing wheels and blinging them out a bit. Wait till you see this (if it works)... :eekster:
  • 12-22-2012
    Clockwork Bikes
    This looks like Aircraft Remover.

  • 12-22-2012
    G-reg
    Strategically placed painted panels?
  • 12-22-2012
    bikeabuser
    I haven't used it, so I can't swear by it, but ... Permatex 80646 is supposed to be the chemical removal method of choice.

    Removing Powder Coating Quickly and Cheaply -- Chopper Surplus
  • 12-22-2012
    shiggy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Nope;

    This is nowhere close to fail, even, but I don't really blame them. I'm the best judge there is of what is good and what I want. I'm also very good at judging what other people want, even if they don't know themselves. After hours of talking with people about their projects and what they will be like, I just tell them, "look... I have a general idea of what you think you want, but do be aware that I am not doing this for you. I'm doing it for me. If I am merely satisfied, you will be orgasmic because I can out fuss anyone. I can be as fussy as you can afford. I've never had to redo anything yet!!

    I have an idea of how to salvage it worked out in my head. We'll see if we can pull it off. I think it is very doable. Until then, I'll content myself with lacing wheels and blinging them out a bit. Wait till you see this (if it works)... :eekster:

    They may be able to just overcoat the frame. Ask before you do anything.
  • 12-22-2012
    TrailMaker
    Wheel Building Hurdle #1
    OK;

    Check off the first one. It took a few swings, but I finally hit the first curve ball. The video tutorial I was watching used spoke holes directly opposite each other on opposing flanges. Just could not get the wheel to lace on the BS until I stopped to take note of those spoke holes. Turns out the spoke holes on these hubs are BETWEEN the ones on the other flange, so his method would not work at all. To be fair, he did mention that hubs all have their idiosyncrasies, so there are no hard rules for them.

    Took a couple of tries to locate the proper starting hole for the "Innies" on the BS, but when I found it, it all came good! Two wheels laced and ready for truing.

    As I mentioned previously, I've never done wheels before, but I know quite for sure that lacing is the EASY part of wheel building! What fun lies ahead.... :skep:
  • 12-22-2012
    davesauvageau
    I would keep the color simple being that the frame is so nicely crafted. I would not go crazy with colors. What are you going with for components?
  • 12-23-2012
    shiggy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    OK;

    Check off the first one. It took a few swings, but I finally hit the first curve ball. The video tutorial I was watching used spoke holes directly opposite each other on opposing flanges. Just could not get the wheel to lace on the BS until I stopped to take note of those spoke holes. *Turns out the spoke holes on these hubs are BETWEEN the ones on the other flange, so his method would not work at all. To be fair, he did mention that hubs all have their idiosyncrasies, so there are no hard rules for them.

    Took a couple of tries to locate the proper starting hole for the "Innies" on the BS, but when I found it, it all came good! Two wheels laced and ready for truing.

    As I mentioned previously, I've never done wheels before, but I know quite for sure that lacing is the EASY part of wheel building! What fun lies ahead.... :skep:

    *That is true with all hubs. Matches the position of the spoke holes in the rim. The Crank Brothers wheels being an exception.

    If you are using the video I think you are, it is cr##, and screws up the lacing pattern. Read this thread: http://forums.mtbr.com/wheels-tires/...s-822812.html?
  • 12-23-2012
    golden boy
    I learned how to build wheels from Sheldon Brown. Not personally, of course. What a loss for the cycling community. Nobody gave the straight dope like Sheldon.
  • 12-23-2012
    Stockli Boy
    Also refer to Zinn's books for good tutorials on wheelbuilding. I've done about 30 pairs and always refer to my 2004 Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance when lacing. Worked fine for my offset GFS Pugz wheelset.

    Be careful and count your turns and revolutions while tensioning. Gravy's signature of one colored nipple is worth stealing, as you should go 1/4 turns all the way around as you tension. Resist the urge to go for more. It is also important to start with all nipples at 3 threads visible. Staying religious with this will build a wheel with minimal hop and fast truing. Oh, and the first beer should come AFTER you get it laced. then it might take 2-3 during the tensioning/truing phase.
  • 12-24-2012
    TrailMaker
    Well;

    I was indeed using the Bike Tube vid. After I figured out the offset spoke hole thing, the only thing that was "difficult" was getting the fist spoke in the right spot to line the logo on the hub with the valve hole. I ran each spoke on roughly 5 turns to start. I then took my screw driver and ran them until the driver would not any more. At this point they were not tight. Then, I used the spoke wrench for 5 half turns more each. By feel they were moderately snug at this point. I dropped the front wheel in the fork and SHAZZAM! No hop at all, and it only took 5 minutes to bring into true to my taste. Mostly it was trying to optimize the rather loose tolerance of the rim joint! The "ting test" has all spokes sounding off in tune, to an amazing degree, frankly.

    Simple!

    Since the front was so easy, I am of course fully prepared for the rear wheel to be an absolute beyach.
  • 12-24-2012
    Eric Malcolm
    Well done TM. No 2 rims are ever alike, and the challenge of the rim joint.......

    Keep up the good work.

    Eric
  • 12-24-2012
    TrailMaker
    Thanks Mate;

    I must be the wheel building savant. The rear one was just as easy as the front. I have not trued it yet, and need to check it for center, but it also has zero hop and very little run out. Of course not having to calculate spoke lengths and all that is a big advantage, but simply taking them apart and putting them back together was not very difficult.

    Or maybe I just got lucky.....
  • 12-30-2012
    Sick Sticks
    I'm feeling quite inspired. Where does one source a 100mm steel bb shell?
  • 12-30-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    I've gotten them from both Whipsmart and Paragon.
  • 12-30-2012
    todwil
    Hey Trail we need some update pics!
  • 12-30-2012
    Fox Fire
    Man, this is a work of art, I'm a big fan of cruiser frame styles & to have one built like this would be the perfect bike, thers not enuff digits on the cool factor chart to measure this on, wish I had your talent.

    BRAVO, BRAVO, MORE !!!
  • 12-30-2012
    Fox Fire
    Have to ask...are you a machinist or welder by trade ?? you to do some very clean work.:thumbsup:
  • 12-31-2012
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    I started out in auto collision professionally, and was into muscle cars and such. I drove my first Porsche in 1989 and bought it two days later. Not much interest in muscle cars after that! I've transitioned away from working on cars to now eventually owning my own Porsche specialty shop. Anything fabrication has always been a natural for me, and I've just recently gotten more serious about machining, but I have no formal training in any of it. I had near a dozen bikes in my stable as a kid, so combine that love with fabrication and a serious creative streak, and voila!

    Right now in the mid holiday doldrums, I'm looking at ways of fixing this powder coat job. Not near good enough for this project. I'll be working with the PCer this week, hopefully. Otherwise I could finish it in a couple of hours, but until then, no build progress.
  • 12-31-2012
    Fox Fire
    Cool mindset man, good old American ingenuity, HAIL YEOUW !!!

    Ya gotta give us a clue as to what color/s you thinking .....
  • 01-01-2013
    TrailMaker


  • 01-01-2013
    Eric Malcolm
    Very nice TM.

    Glad the Trueing went well for you. The rims must be well made in circular and joint tolerances.

    Did you do a before and after weight check? Interested to see how much weight came off the rims.

    Eric
  • 01-01-2013
    MiWi
    Absolutely stunning work ! Thanks for sharing.
  • 01-01-2013
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    One thing I have still not gotten is a scale for weighing such things. I've wanted one that would weigh to 10ths of a gram, from virtually nothing all the way to 15-20lbs, but I'm not sure such exists. I haven't found it yet anyway. Suffice to say it is a VERY noticeable weight loss. Really kind of geeked me out while I was doing it. I mean, I weigh 240 and it made me kind of wiggy feeling how light they were getting. I think I've read upwards of 1lb, and these are "only" 1.375 holes. I'm sure it could be searched for over on the FB Forum, as this is a common mod.

    This will partially compensate for the cheap 27TPI tires it will have on it some of the time. I'll be interested to see how they hold up.
  • 01-01-2013
    bikeabuser
    Looking very cool ... Definately keeping an eye out for the final result.
  • 01-01-2013
    Walt
    Old Will Knott!
    TM -

    I use this one:
    My Weigh UltraShip 35

    I figure + o - 5g or so is acceptable for bike stuff, and I wanted to be able to weigh big boxes of bike frames for shipping.

    If you want more/less max weight or better accuracy, you can get those things (ie 3000g max and 1g increment) for pretty cheap. They have everything scale-related known to man, it's awesome.

    This sucker is close to what you're looking for:
    Citizen CT-3000H

    -Walt

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Hey;

    One thing I have still not gotten is a scale for weighing such things. I've wanted one that would weigh to 10ths of a gram, from virtually nothing all the way to 15-20lbs, but I'm not sure such exists. I haven't found it yet anyway. Suffice to say it is a VERY noticeable weight loss. Really kind of geeked me out while I was doing it. I mean, I weigh 240 and it made me kind of wiggy feeling how light they were getting. I think I've read upwards of 1lb, and these are "only" 1.375 holes. I'm sure it could be searched for over on the FB Forum, as this is a common mod.

    This will partially compensate for the cheap 27TPI tires it will have on it some of the time. I'll be interested to see how they hold up.

  • 01-02-2013
    TrailMaker
    Thanks Walt;

    A great resource!
  • 01-02-2013
    petey15
    Whoa! I hadn't seen this thread before, but remember you mentioning your new build on the trail at CVSP (we both were out on a picture-taking excursion and you got some shots of me). I am in complete and utter awe! That frame is a thing of beauty and I'm pretty much rendered speechless right now. I cannot wait to see you out on the trails on that!! What's the ETA on completion?
  • 01-02-2013
    cendres
    The wheels look excellent, John! I've got a remarkably similar pair in my garage for a client.
  • 01-02-2013
    Rody
    TM,

    So happy for you that you are having such fun.

    It is in concept fabrication like this that time invested in working through "meaningless projects" to build a solid foundation of problem solving pays off :thumbsup:

    Forget the powder coat, you know it is unlikely to produce the finish you desire. It's time to take the next step and begin learning the art of paint...it will enrich your experience.

    rody
  • 01-03-2013
    1 cog frog
    Wow
    Blown away! That is a beautiful frame. Can't wait to see it finished and built up!

    I am a machinist, and totally understand the "why buy it when I can make it" mentality. It may seem silly to the average Joe or Jane, but there is an inherent satisfaction in using something that I built with my own 2 hands and some cool machines!

    I get all giddy when an idea pops in my head followed by the "I can make that" realization!

    Looking forward to the finished build!

    frog
  • 01-06-2013
    bmxrider13
    wow
    cool frame man
  • 01-06-2013
    bikeabuser
    TM,

    Fat Paint

    I found what you need :D
  • 01-08-2013
    todwil
    The rims turned out great now we need to see a roller....come on Trail you killin us!!!:D
  • 01-08-2013
    TrailMaker
    1 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by todwil View Post
    ... now we need to see a roller....come on Trail you killin us!!!:D

    Yeh;

    I'm at the head of that line. I should hear from the PCer tomorrow I hope. The fix won't look perfect, I don't think, but hopefully it is better than the first attempt. All I can offer right now is another tease.
  • 01-08-2013
    crux
    2 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Yeh;

    I'm at the head of that line. I should hear from the PCer tomorrow I hope. The fix won't look perfect, I don't think, but hopefully it is better than the first attempt. All I can offer right now is another tease.

    Your such a tease.

    And now for a shameless plug to top off the beautiful frame with a hand fabricated top cap. Warned you it would be a shameless plug.
  • 01-08-2013
    TrailMaker
    Yes;

    I have spent time on your site, looking through all of your offerings, and was quite impressed by the creativity and craftsmanship. Plug away as much as you like as far as I'm concerned.

    :thumbsup:
  • 01-24-2013
    todwil
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by todwil View Post
    The rims turned out great now we need to see a roller....come on Trail you killin us!!!:D

    OK Trail we need some pics its been two weeks...and we're not taking no as an answer!!:D:D
  • 01-24-2013
    TrailMaker
    Yah....

    How 'bout a nice pic of my proposed HT badge?



    Otherwise, its a no. Rest assured... I'm not a happy camper.

    :madman:

    -
  • 01-24-2013
    briderdt
    Nice badge! I like it.
  • 01-24-2013
    shirk
    Snow will be all melted by the time this gets finished.

    Sucks to hear the PC is holding up your build.