Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    No mountains near by :(
    Reputation: bluechair84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    117

    Suss bearings, how to decide which ones?

    I'm working out the hardware side of the frame these days, and need to decide on what bearings to use at the pivot locations (full suss... obv). I'm tempted to just go with a size that's used on the frames I have but has anyone else come to some conclusions about this part of their own build and able to share some advise or links?
    Cheers

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    196
    the bigger the bearings the better the wear and stiffness will be. the smaller the bearings the lighter they will be and the less material will be required for the housing. another consideration is what to use for the axle/hardware. it may be worth it to just copy an existing frame's pivot setup so that you can use a readily available, production hardware piece such as the axle that would be too time consuming to make one offs or use hardware store bolts for the hardware which would be heavy and ugly. this would give your frame a more professional appearance while simplifying things for you a bit.
    on the frame I am building I used angular contact bearings for internal headsets(2 tops with compression rings) and machined a mini headtube that became the bearing housing. the axle is a piece of 1.125x.095 aluminum ala a steerer tube. the swingarm clamps to the axle with 2 1.125" ID collars like a stem. The swingarm is quite stiff and was fabricated with the bearings preloaded. There is too much movement from loose assembly to preloaded for my taste so I'll do something else next time. I thought the ACB's could have a pretty good stiffness to weight ratio but it wasn't super simple to build.
    I do think Angular Contact Bearings are the ****, check out how santa cruz for instance uses them on their bikes.

  3. #3
    No mountains near by :(
    Reputation: bluechair84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    117
    Cheers, brilliant reply. I think it would be very sensible to borrow the hardware from another bike to simplify things, good idea.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    157
    look at what full compliment means ,the actual width of your bearing locations in terms of distance between bearings and its actual rotation in degrees at each location

    extrapolate from there

  5. #5
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,010
    Quote Originally Posted by sonic reducer View Post
    .
    I do think Angular Contact Bearings are the ****, check out how santa cruz for instance uses them on their bikes.
    Story from Dave Turner back in the day is that he had engineers come up with the best solution to bike pivots. They said tapered bearings if possible, but barring the cost and complexity surrounding them, IGUS bushings provide the most bang for the buck in terms of cost, lateral rigidity and movement. Needle bearings are great for bigger pivots, but do not deal with torsion well (require a 2nd bearing/bushing) and hard to implement on the small scale. I'd like to see more of both the tapered bearings and bushing system used for so many years on the turners (with grease ports and grease channels). It's a real slick system and the ole ball-bearing systems are always a few levels below IMO. At least get some grease ports in there...Just my 2 cents.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  6. #6
    No mountains near by :(
    Reputation: bluechair84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    117
    I worked out what bearings to go with. Part of my issue was their width but found a good site with all the data I needed. I looked at those IGUS bushes and I think they could be really good - especially on the pivots with very low rotation as bearings will 'bore' into the raceways, whilst the bushes maintain the load across the entire surface. Bearings might be better at high rotation pivots as the balls are given more opportunity to move. Once the prototype is built I'm going to experiment with the IGUS bushes.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by sonic reducer View Post
    on the frame I am building I used angular contact bearings for internal headsets(2 tops with compression rings) and machined a mini headtube that became the bearing housing. the axle is a piece of 1.125x.095 aluminum ala a steerer tube. the swingarm clamps to the axle with 2 1.125" ID collars like a stem. The swingarm is quite stiff and was fabricated with the bearings preloaded. There is too much movement from loose assembly to preloaded for my taste so I'll do something else next time. I thought the ACB's could have a pretty good stiffness to weight ratio but it wasn't super simple to build.
    I do think Angular Contact Bearings are the ****, check out how santa cruz for instance uses them on their bikes.
    I wanted to use two upper headsets for my main pivot too. So once built up is it fine?
    Guillaume

    Cycles Golem

Similar Threads

  1. 29er Dual suss, which one...
    By Kelby in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-15-2013, 11:43 PM
  2. Full Suss for 4'11'' 151 cm lady
    By simonuk in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-19-2012, 03:48 PM
  3. Cheapest Specialized Full Suss??
    By Specialized-Nutta in forum Specialized
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-07-2012, 06:34 PM
  4. Steel AM Full Suss
    By mickeydesadist in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 09-07-2011, 08:40 PM
  5. Max rider weight for a full suss?
    By jtorlando25 in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-24-2011, 12:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •