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  1. #1
    The cat's name is jake
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    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.

    It's Sunday, and people might be bored and looking for pictures to browse, so I'll oblige.
    I'm sitting at my bench next to the Deckel waiting for parts to finish, and have some time to kill.

    Here's some stuff I've welded in the last week:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04910.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04911.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04914.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04915.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04916.jpg  


  2. #2
    The cat's name is jake
    Reputation: BungedUP's Avatar
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    And more:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04918.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04922.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04929.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04933.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04937.jpg  


  3. #3
    The cat's name is jake
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    I moved this summer from one house to another. That required moving my shop to the new house, which took a fair amount of time. I've still been shuffling things around and trying to get situated, while doing the regular things that go along with life - spending time with my wife and young daughter, fixing up the house, day job, etc.

    I realized that I needed to get better organized to shoehorn everything in and still have room to work. I get side work where I need a fair amount of space, so I wanted to be able to move things around, but have everything be sturdy, simple, and built to last. I previously had a lot of stuff just stacked on top of itself.

    I've got 3 carts going on - 2 welding carts made from angle and architectural tubing (which just stinks to weld BTW). I have a 3rd "cart" (it's really more of a table) for one of my benders, and it will house the hydraulic powerpack underneath it and all wiring and plumbing. I don't have pictures of that up yet.

    Concurrent with that (while waiting on parts, etc.), I am also making a series of lathe toolblock mounted clamps to hold various sizes of tubing for coping tubing in the lathe. Once that is done, there are more projects, but if I can get all that done in the next couple of weeks, I'll be happy.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04897.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04778.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04725.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04903.jpg  

    Some pictures of my work, along with other misc. goofy stuff.-dsc04904.jpg  


  4. #4
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    Great looking welds! What machine settings are you using?

  5. #5
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    Perfection!

    Love the carts too, I really need to build a cart for my welder.

  6. #6
    Nemophilist
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    Geeez...

    That computer controlled automated TIG welder you bought is really working nicely! How long did it take to set up?
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  7. #7
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    Those are some perty welds!

  8. #8
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    Machine settings????
    Come on BungedUP, admit it, those beautiful welds have been preceded by lots and lots of seat time.
    And no offence intended - pretty well perfect welds.

  9. #9
    Nemophilist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Testmule View Post
    ... those beautiful welds have been preceded by lots and lots of seat time.
    Ya Think?



    -
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    That's about as good as I've seen, Peter. The thing that is likely more amazing is that he can do that faster than I can do my grape welds.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  10. #10
    The cat's name is jake
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    Hey thanks, guys! Mighty kind words from all of you.

    JDS2385 & Testmule - Machine settings aren't anything special. For the aluminum work, I typically use 150 amps and somewhere between 60-120 hz for the AC frequency, depending on this or that. I use whatever the least amount of cleaning on the balance that I can safely get away with, which is usually between 70-85% DCEN (I move things around as needed). No pulsing, not even much with the footpedal, unless I need to. Travel speed is fast, rather than slow, for both steel and aluminum, but especially aluminum. Settings for steel, I tend to run it hot - 145 amps, and about 1.8 pps. I wouldn't really recommend the way I do it to someone else, it's just something that works for me.

    And John - well really, the TIG welder IS computer controlled! Now my MIG machine on the other hand, that doesn't even have a real circuit board in it (excluding the feeder)- it's more mechanical than electronic, in many ways.

    Thanks again!

  11. #11
    650b me
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    I am so often humbled and inspired by the work I see on this forum, and this is no exception! Your welds are achingly beautiful. Every time I see welds like these it makes me want to ditch the OA setup and learn to weld. Would save so much time on finish work!

    I hope you will post more photos of the completed bike frames in both steel and aluminum. Curious about the aluminum...what alloy is this? Does it require heat-treating after welding?

  12. #12
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    Seriously, that's ridiculously good looking.

    Thanks for sharing !

    Cheers !

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the reply. I'm still working on getting my pulse settings & filler timing dialed. I've been practicing with 2.4 pps. Keep up the good work.

  14. #14
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    Liked the images.Never the less ,you efforts are very marvelous , wonderful

  15. #15
    Nice day for a ride.....
    Reputation: Bikin' Bric's Avatar
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    WOW is all I can say.... those welds are beautiful.
    2012 Norco CCX3
    2014 Nashbar Fatbike

  16. #16
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    I've been welding at 1pps for 5 bikes now, and I've tried 1.5 and 2 pps before but after doing several bikes and getting the gist of the filler dab and the pause that 1.8pps really is nice. I see how you can run hotter and move faster and not have burn through, maybe the holy grail of welding thin gauge tubes? I just tried it on chainstays to the BB and sweet
    thanks for sharing
    andy walker

  17. #17
    The cat's name is jake
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    Golden Boy - the alloy is a 7xxx variant, and it gets an artificial aging heat treatment (basically heated gently in a big oven). And I wouldn't ditch the OA torch for anything! Nothing replaces brazing for some things.

    Thanks again for all the nice things people have said.

    Regarding welding settings, if you end up trying to use similar power supply settings for steel (which again, I'm not recommending), use low peak on time, and as little background current as you can. The idea is to hammer the filler into the base metal, so that the toes are flush but not undercut, and then freeze the puddle fast before the walls come down. This works for 4130 type steels (TT verus/ox plat, reynolds 725/853). That method does NOT work on stainless steels, or aluminum. Stainless needs to have much higher background and peak current times, or it gets surface cracks, which align, and then gang up to form bigger cracks. Aluminum just needs to have power on all the time.

  18. #18
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    That pulse explanation was helpful for me. I experimented with more peak amps, less background amps and less on time with good results. What are your thoughts on .035 vs .045 filler? What do you use? Thanks

  19. #19
    The cat's name is jake
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    Hi jds2835,

    I'm glad that information was useful to someone. I use a wide variety of filler rod sizes, depending on a wide variety of factors that are much too boring to go into. However, for the bulk of bicycle welding, I prefer .045" rod. I used to use .035" rod as my go-to rod size for bike tubing, but discovered that the fillet size with .045" matches that current properties from the power supply (at least the way I do it). Using .035" can lead to an under-filled fillet, or a fillet that is very small and more difficult to control the dimensions of. With .045" rod, it will more reliably form the correctly shaped fillet, with even width puddles.

  20. #20
    Nemophilist
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    Hey Peter;

    I have discovered over time - or to date at least intuited it - that aspect of filler diameter and its effect on the weld are quite important. The smallest my local supplier carries is .063-ish - going from memory, which is always fraught with peril. For those that have not delved into the art portion of welding, to some extent, you are threatening to "blow out" the weld area as you enter a heat cycle (whether pulsing or not). At the penultimate moment, you add the filler and it flows into the heat zone. In a sense, you are using the application of filler as a coolant, saving the puddle from blowing out. Timing and cadence/rhythm is obviously critical here, but so too is the rod size. I can see from my own crude and variously failed attempts at creating these aspirational jewel-like welds that my large filler size creates a huge blob that I have to pause on to flow it in, where a smaller rod size would more easily assimilate itself into a more uniform size fillet width. I could solve this by turning up the heat, but that is not the goal, and not helpful to the minimization of the HAZ.

    I only wish I could do it as well as I can conceptualize it. Perhaps a few thousand hours behind a mask would help?
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  21. #21
    The cat's name is jake
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    Hi John,

    If your local supplier doesn't carry .045, they should be able to get it in for you, albeit in a 10# box, most likely.

    My co-worker Teryk and I have been doing a lot of experimenting with filler rod lately, and have noticed some things that I'll share at a later time, once I have a little report complete with some pictures and text. It will probably only be interesting to other dorks like myself, but nonetheless I'll make it available for anyone to read here within the next couple of months (most likely - we are still trying to source certain rods). This experimenting is relevant in that besides getting the right technique, people may also be fighting some other issues related to welding gas, consumables like gas lenses, and filler materials (not all filler is the same, even when labelled as such). If you have a lot of experience, these issues don't necessarily stop you from being successful, but can make some things more difficult. I don't want to get ahead of myself here, though - this is all information for another time.

    One thing that I'll mention regarding technique is that there are some techiniques that apply to most situations, and some techniques which are better applied under specific circumstances.

    I use a variety of methods for filler rod addition, depending on the material, and what I'm trying to do. I'll give an example: When welding thick materials, say for a TIG welded "structural" project, I find that pulsing is not needed. Rather, using the appropriate filler, the correct weave motion, and either a "dab" or continuous filler feed works best *for me*. You can also do the same work using pulse, and the "lay-rod" method. For aluminum work, manual filler rod addition via the "dab" method is the only way I've found to make consistent bead width welds. I've done aluminum pulsing, but it never adds anything useful to the mix.

    With thin-wall carbon steels (not stainless), I find that by far and away, the "lay-rod" technique is the best way to go to get good looking and sound welds. Occasionally, the "dab" method is needed for certain areas. but 97% of what I do works best with "lay-rod". Areas that do better with the "dab" method are acute angles, where undercutting is prone - such as the underside of fork crowns, underneath DT/HT junctions, and so forth. If undercutting can be avoided while using the "lay-rod" method, do it. Note that many times, with this technique, a sliding action is needed to move new rod into the area where filler deposit is needed.

    With stainless steels, if it is of any thickness, this is not the best technique. Manual dabbing is often required in order to get the fillet thick enough that it doesn't want to crack. The fillet needs to have a certain amount of convexity in order to not form a centerline crack.

    Just a few random thoughts...

  22. #22
    RCP Fabrication
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    Good info!

    .035 and .045 880T by the pound is available from Wade here: Other Products « Cycle Design

    I think he will be adding some er70s2 and er70s6 in the future.

  23. #23
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    Peter;

    I have seen it as a great potential resource if you were to add this sort of info here - on any imaginable relevant topic - knowing in my gut from our conversations that it certainly was available, and in quantity. While I think it is safe to say that you are operating on a FAR higher level than most of us here may ever be, some of us can definitely - in the abstract at least - understand the exceedingly complex nature of the info you offer. It is fascinating. In other words, it is probable that someone such as myself will never reach that level of proficiency, but having done enough of it, I can grasp what you are saying. my mind's eye saw your words in action as I read them! There is a subset of people that crave this sort of indepth understanding. Whether they can utilize it to its fullest is another matter, but that does not in any way mitigate its usefulness for EVERYONE. Even if the smallest of morsels sinks in, it is a huge win. Being able to make best use of it is another realm beyond.

    Thanks, Dude!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  24. #24
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    I have been working on an advanced tig educational page, I would love to get this sort of information and more up there. It's currently a facebook group. If anyone is interested: www.realtigweldors.com

  25. #25
    The cat's name is jake
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    Wow, thanks John. I'm not sure I deserve all the praise, but it's very nice nonetheless. I enjoy sharing what little I know, especially if it goes to some use for someone else.

    On a total side note - we have a rare occurrence in the Willamette Valley here - substantial snow and ice! When I go outside, you can hear the branches snapping all over the place, several a minute. I know most everyone else is buried by this stuff, and what we've got probably doesn't even phase anyone else. I am realizing now how a fatbike like yours would be SUUUUPER fun right now.

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