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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    thinking more about the G0704. Since you can rotate the head, why use a rotary table? Just set up the head at the angle you want and go to town. I know someone that uses their Bridgeport this way. Is there something about this mill I'm missing? Or is it just because the head takes longer to adjust than the rotary table?

    Yep, I think that is why it is set up that way. The way that you adjust the head angle of the G0704 is kind of cumbersome. Access isn't great, and there's no worm gear like on a B'port to crank the head over.
    It's probably one of those things that you'd get quicker at the more you did it, but I don't think it'd ever be as quick and convenient as dialing in the angle on a rotary table.

    As old domestic built horizontals in reasonable working condition become harder to find, I think that adapting machines like the G0704 will become more common.

    Sure, it's a made in China machine tool will potentially suffer from many of the problems that those machines are known to come with. OTOH, if you're just building a notcher, and don't want to spend two years waiting for the perfect machine to show up, it's an affordable way to get the ball rolling.

    Alistair.

  2. #27
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    I'll have to go look at that machine. I have an x/y dro that I could slap on there too if I decide that's worth it. Ever since I figured out that my lathe is too worn out to miter I've been trying to figure out what to replace it with.

  3. #28
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    Well,

    I can't comment on the mill's mitering abilities yet myself. I've been working through a list of jigs and other knick knacks that I've wanted to make since I got the mill. Not done any mitering with it yet myself, but that should change soon.
    Mike at ANT is the only person I know of who has experience using this mill for mitering bicycle tubing, but I am sure there must be others.

    I did put a set of digital X-Y scales on my mill, as a budget DRO. Works well, and has been very useful in turning out accurate work. For it's weight, the mill has decent travels and power (1 HP). The tapered gibs are a nice touch, giving smooth table and head travel.

    When I got mine I took it all apart, just to see what was what. Here's a Flickr set,
    G0704 Mill. - a set on Flickr
    which may give you a better idea of the scale of the thing.

    Alistair.

  4. #29
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    We use a small harrison horizontal for our mitring (I'm sure there area pictures of it set up on our flickr page), It's pretty worn out but still manages to cut accurate mitres. I only use it for the main tubes.

    What I'm interested in is the scope for using one of these small machines as a basis for a dedicated chainstay mitring machine (not just a fixture). It seems to me that for the cost of the Anvil fixtures (for example) you could buy one of these little machines and make something that has it's own power built in too. I think chainstay to BB mitres are the obvious ones as you can lock/bolt/weld everything except one feed so it's as rigid as possible

    just a thought
    matt

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18bikes View Post
    We use a small harrison horizontal for our mitring (I'm sure there area pictures of it set up on our flickr page), It's pretty worn out but still manages to cut accurate mitres. I only use it for the main tubes.

    What I'm interested in is the scope for using one of these small machines as a basis for a dedicated chainstay mitring machine (not just a fixture). It seems to me that for the cost of the Anvil fixtures (for example) you could buy one of these little machines and make something that has it's own power built in too. I think chainstay to BB mitres are the obvious ones as you can lock/bolt/weld everything except one feed so it's as rigid as possible

    just a thought
    matt
    You could even remove completely the X/Y table part (and sell it), lay the column horizontally on a bench, and bolt the CS jig on the top (what was the front) of the column... Just an idea like that... ;-)

  6. #31
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    I had a fleeting thought of finding the largest possible milling attachment for a lathe and modding that for a dedicated machine. But time is worth something

  7. #32
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    My thinking was it would save some time over starting from scratch - maybe take as much effort as building your own fixtures, but they'd end up as dedicated machines instead. Only an idle thought really, I've never even used one of these machines so have no idea of their capabilities. I'd really like a chainstay fixture but can't justify the cost of buying one, I'll probably make something that bolts direct to the table of the harrison but it'll mean reamoving the rotary table every time I want to use it

  8. #33
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    Why the love for horizontal mills? I've not found the set up to be that difficult on a vertical mill and the management of coolant seems a lot easier on a vertical. I flood cool during the cut using a ice cream bucket, a 15$ fountain pump and a piece of lexan bent to contain the spray. Even KVA stainless cuts like butter with flood cooling.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by TgMN View Post
    Why the love for horizontal mills? I've not found the set up to be that difficult on a vertical mill and the management of coolant seems a lot easier on a vertical. I flood cool during the cut using a ice cream bucket, a 15$ fountain pump and a piece of lexan bent to contain the spray. Even KVA stainless cuts like butter with flood cooling.

    Nothing wrong with mitering on a vertical. knee mill. A horizontal does give a more rigid set up though, just based on the fundamental design differences between the two. Setting up a mitering system on a horizontal is more intuitive I'd say, and simpler.

    I think maybe there was a time when used horizontal mills in decent condition were plentiful , and could be gotten for good prices (in certain parts of the country anyway). Compared to the cost of buying a dedicated notching machine they were usually much cheaper, so even lower production shops could have three or four, each dedicated to a particular op. They're compact, with small footprints, compared to turret/knee mills, again making them suited to smaller shops.

    It seems that maybe those days are coming to an end. I still see horizontals for sale, but more often than not they're behemoth Cincinnati's and the like, not the much smaller machines like say a Nichol's hand miller. Again, it probably depends a lot on which part of the country you're in.

    There's a video floating around out there somewhere showing Carl Strong's set up, which is a bigger version of what Mike F. did with that small Grizzly mill. He has the head turned 90 deg. and a power feed on the X axis with a limit switch. He can start the the machine and walk away to do something else. The machine cuts the miter and switches itself off, which I always thought was quite handy.

    Alistair.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spence View Post

    I did put a set of digital X-Y scales on my mill, as a budget DRO. Works well, and has been very useful in turning out accurate work.
    Any chance you have a photo of the budget DRO setup...? Interested!

    Do you find the table travel pretty rigid when running passes and milling? I know with my mini it is pretty loose so there's too much chatter to use it in anything more than a tube notcher.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meriwether View Post
    Any chance you have a photo of the budget DRO setup...? Interested!

    Do you find the table travel pretty rigid when running passes and milling? I know with my mini it is pretty loose so there's too much chatter to use it in anything more than a tube notcher.

    There's a few pic's of the X-Y scales install in that Flickr set I linked to earlier. Pretty basic kit that I bought from Grizzly. They're holding up well so far.

    As for milling, the G0704 handles it well. The tapered gibs let you strike that fine line between minimal play and smooth travel. I take 0.080" roughing cuts in alu. with a roughing end mill and this gives a decent finish. No big deal for a "real" mill but I think it's pretty decent for this little machine.
    Over on CNCZone there's guys that upgrade the G0704 with high speed motors, upgraded spindle bearings and flood cooling. With that set up they get some very impressive depth of cut and inches per minute numbers. I'm not really interested in getting into all that myself, but it's interesting to see what the mill can handle.

    With regular end mills the finish is very good, and I've got fly cutting figured out to where I'm getting excellent finish on light (0.005") finish passes.

    I'll be posting a flickr set showing the build sequence for my fork jig soon, hopefully in the next week. That should help to give you an idea of what the mill can do.

    Cheers,

    Alistair.

  12. #37
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    imgur: the simple image sharer
    (I would embed but the picture wanted to take up the whole page for some reason...)

    Benchtop mill that weighs about 650lbs, 2hp 110 or 220v motor. Picked it up off of CL for $600 in cherry condition. It's a Harbo Freight brand but it's the same mill that is sold under like 7 different brands. Works kickass so far! Round column is a tad annoying, but it has a pretty significant amount of Z travel and we have a collet set for all of our tools so it's not a big deal once dialed in....

  13. #38
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    I am still doing research.

    Has anyone used a Baileigh TN-300?
    Baileigh TN-300 Tube and Pipe Notcher 3" Capacity, Offset Notching, Made in the USA - YouTube

    These machines look interesting because as a dedicated hole saw notching machine the price is *almost* attractive. What seems most attractive about the machine is that it is small in size and not super heavy so it would not require a forklift to move it into my shop. The machine also looks super simple and while it does not have the flexibility of a small milling machine it might be better then an mill of equivalent size.

    What do you guys think? Has anyone around here used one?
    Mark Farnsworth
    http://febikes.wordpress.com, Raleigh, NC

  14. #39
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    That looks like a nice machine. No personal experience with it but hole saws can be slow and sometimes overmatched when working with heat treated tubes (the quality of the hole saw can matter here, too). Something that may be worth considering depending on what raw materials you like to use?

    If it were my money, I'd be looking for a lathe first. A lathe can be easily adapted to mitering by building a tube clamp that you can mount on the compound...A simple V-block set to the centerline of the headstock, using the compound to set your angles.

    Want to turn up some bushings for your full-sus project? How about quickly busting out a star-nut setting tool to assemble your new frame? Beyond mitering, a lathe is a far more versatile tool to sacrifice floor space for. ...Then I'd save for the mill.

  15. #40
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    lathes are pretty useful, but so is a mill. I think if I were in the market for a dedicated tube mitering machine, I would not go for the Baleigh. I have a fairly long list of things they could have done better, but at $2500, there are lots better options. I have helped move a Bridgeport down into a basement so really I don't see how the mill drills would be an issue moving. The G0704 looks like a better machine than the Baleigh. It weighs less than 300 pounds and can be disassembled fairly easily from what I see people doing with it. That is my current plan.

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