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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Meriwether's Avatar
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    Silver brazed seatstays?

    What do you all think of this?
    This is not mine but a very well known builder that knows his stuff.
    This scares me for some reason, but i also want to try it on a cross frame...Silver brazed seatstays?-seatstays-silverbrazed.jpg

  2. #2
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    It's a compression joint and fairly low stress. Plus I would do anything that Brent Steelman does--that dudes bikes are awesome.
    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  3. #3
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    Silver brazed seatstays?

    I hope my question wasn't taken as questioning Brent, he's one of the best! I just had never seen that method if joining fastback stays before. It is damn cool.

  4. #4
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    I have seen this done by lots of builders. One I follow on Instagram cleans up the outside after brazing so it looks like there is no joint at all; The strength is in the internal fillet.

  5. #5
    J_K
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    Good timing for this thread.
    I have planned to do the seatstays this way on the next build, although I will brass braze them instead of silver brazing them.


    Quote Originally Posted by toby_g View Post
    I have seen this done by lots of builders. One I follow on Instagram cleans up the outside after brazing so it looks like there is no joint at all; The strength is in the internal fillet.
    Care to post that instagram link?

  6. #6
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    Here are 2 I can find quickly:

    Stanridge Cycles



    Feather Cycles


  7. #7
    J_K
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    Thanks!
    Those are good examples.

  8. #8
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    Because of the angle, the contact area on the inside is actually pretty big - I do it this way on lugged frames.

  9. #9
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    I don't do it that way because I get annoyed with brazing quickly, but I have done a few that way in the past and it works fine. A nice way to avoid the most difficult joint if you are doing TIG too - road bike fastback clusters are a PITA with TIG.

    -Walt
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.blogspot.com

  10. #10
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    Silver brazed seatstays?

    I just tig'd a frame here with a 45 deg miter and I wish I had brazed it...holy cow. Brazing wouldn't been faster and better. Wishbones are so much easier.

  11. #11
    The cat's name is jake
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    With a little practice, TIG welding those seatstay clusters aren't too bad. If you start on the inside, weld around each side starting from the tightest part in the center bottom. After that, roll around each side to the top. Then go somewhere else for a bit and come back and do the section between the stays back to the origin. On .028 and thicker, it's a piece of cake. On .6mm and less stuff, it occasionally gets away from you in the middle, but if you go quickly and surely, it usually works out. That's almost always the key - go hot and fast from the start, and things stay good.

    Those thinly brazed seatstays are quite interesting looking.

  12. #12
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    I think that this is simply a matter of perception. If you Tig, its difficult, if you braze with brass alloys, its got to have 'fat' around it. If you silver, it looks skimpy. If you came from a lug building background, its perfect form and was highly sort after in days of old.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by toby_g View Post
    That is sexy.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  14. #14
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    Simple confidence-building test - measure your rod before and afterwards, so you know how much has gone into the joint. Assuming the frame doesn't rattle, all that silver has built up a lovely internal fillet.

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