Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,962

    School me on Paragon Adjustable dropout

    Or any adjustable drop out. How durable is it. Is it for the singlespeed only? It's available as an option for my potential next 650b bike. I did the search but nothing came up. Thanks

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,838
    They're durable - they're probably one of the most popular adjustable dropouts. You can get a slider with a derailleur hanger.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  3. #3
    Harrumph
    Reputation: G-reg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,566
    They are plenty durable. Spring for the upgraded bolt kit, the hex on the std 6mm stainless bolts are the weak link.

    I'm a fan of Paragon's rocker drops, if your specs allow the disc caliper chainstay-ish mounted. IMO they are much more asthetically pleasing, less likely to slip, and build a stronger rear triangle.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    742
    Standard bolts seem fine. I have been riding my for a long time and never had a problem with the standard bolts. They hold good and unless you are a monkey with a wrench I don't think you will strip them.

    I like the hooded style ones.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  5. #5
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,962
    Thanks for sharing. I figure it'd be great addition even for geared bike as I can make more room in the back when needed


    Sent from my iPhone 4s using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1
    Good timing - I was just about to ask a similar question.

    Do you guys think that these adjustable drops would survive on a DJ bike?

    Cheers

    Buter

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by Buter View Post
    Do you guys think that these adjustable drops would survive on a DJ bike?
    They are easily stout enough for a DJ bike - tubes will fail long before those d/os will fail (I have built several with the tab type). Well designed as is all Paragon stuff

  8. #8
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,068
    Sadly, no Wright style rocker dropouts seem to be available.

    But here's something new they are rumored to roll out soon:


    I only have this picture link and no other info. Would be great to read up on it.

  9. #9
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,962
    That looks awesome, thanks J.

  10. #10
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,068
    But I'm not sure how it works. There seems to be a Titanium part outside, welded to frame, and a black Aluminum part, connected to the Ti with a pivot (?) at the top. But what is that pickaxe-looking adjustable part, how does it work? And what's behind that oval hole in Ti part between hub locknut/adapter and Ti.

  11. #11
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,036
    looks like the Black Cat dropouts, only backwards

  12. #12
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,962

    School me on Paragon Adjustable dropout

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    But I'm not sure how it works. There seems to be a Titanium part outside, welded to frame, and a black Aluminum part, connected to the Ti with a pivot (?) at the top. But what is that pickaxe-looking adjustable part, how does it work? And what's behind that oval hole in Ti part between hub locknut/adapter and Ti.
    The set up looks cool. One of those, I want it, I need it, an I gotta have it


    Sent from my iPhone 4s using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Clockwork Bikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    627
    Here's another pic.

    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  14. #14
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,068
    Oh, thanks! There's another slot!

  15. #15
    Most Delicious
    Reputation: dr.welby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,001
    The part that looks like a trigger is a toggle to release chain tension. You flip it up and it lets the black dropout portion pivot forwards.

  16. #16
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,068
    dr.welby,
    thank you. It's now starting to make sense. Chain/belt tension creates force along the threaded parts, and its line follows slightly below the trigger's axle center, so that the trigger is stable when engaged but the lever arm is short enough to overcome manually.

  17. #17
    Nemophilist
    Reputation: TrailMaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,701
    Hmmm...

    A quick release belt tensioner. The overall practicality of a belt drive system has not managed to dawn on me quite yet, but that is pretty dang slick setup regardless.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boostin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    836
    I've had the sliders on a bike for a couple years now - they work great as long as i don't have to adjust chain tension. I like the rocker design for ease of tensioning the chain although I haven't owned one.

  19. #19
    nothing to see here
    Reputation: Stevob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,039
    Quote Originally Posted by Clockwork Bikes View Post
    Here's another pic.

    But how do you remove the wheel?
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  20. #20
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,036
    must be a through axle

    On edit: I looked to see if there were any pictures of this dropout on the Paragon site. It's in the news section on the front page for now. Dropout is still under development and not for sale. I was a little amused that there is an award for "best mtb with a belt drive" category at NAHBS. I hope they got some coin from Gates for that
    Last edited by unterhausen; 03-05-2013 at 07:38 AM.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dRjOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,716
    ive been trying to work out what was going on with that drop out for days! thanks! it hadnt clicked that it was a lever for tensioning...

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    16
    I noticed that they only offer the adjustable dropouts in Ti and stainless, I'm new to framebuilding and not very knowledgeable on welding and brazing. What is the difference between brazing stainless to CrMo and brazing CrMo to CrMo?

  23. #23
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,036
    chromo can be brazed with bronze. Stainless requires either silver or nickel silver filler

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    16
    Thanks for straightening that out for me

  25. #25
    MTBR member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12

    Paragon Slider dropouts .... just be aware.....

    this is a forum for framebuilders ......? Good advice is priceless. Remember Cannondale's effort anyone? These issues aren't best answered with snappy one line responses.

    If it's for yourself, try using them. Be aware the rear axle is not in line with the seatstay, not even close, so it will put a torque (lever-arm) force on both the seatstay and chainstays. Tapered stays were not designed for that torque force. So if its for a customer....
    An improved design with these dropouts will use larger diameter stays at the rear, so we're talking constant diameter stays. They will be heavier than tapered stays. So not even close to a fishing rod, which with its taper distributes the flex and the load the material takes along its length. So this is dumb design, a backward step in my book.

    So hitting a big bump while seated on the saddle when braking hard (added brakeing torque) on the rear brake and with lots of traction thrown in (most of the force goes into the frame) will put a HUGE bending load on the seatstay and be far more likely to bend them.

    Like this... Name:  paragon_slider-failure-force lines.JPG
Views: 1083
Size:  56.1 KB

    Archibald Sharp wrote the book on this stuff (in 1896). Buy a Copy!! It's not usually possible to argue against his engineering calculations even though they're old. "l" in Figure 306 is NOT GOOD. He says on the next page that 1/2 inch "l" of axle rearward of the seatstay centreline increases the stress on the chainstay material in this case by 7 times!!
    School me on Paragon Adjustable dropout-archibald-sharp-seat-struts.jpg.

    As a fulltime framebuilder, I have only used them once, for a customer who is (thankfully still) really skinny.

    The reasoning behind my reply is also why curved downtubes near the headtube are a dumb idea too..... but that's a whole other discusssion.

    I just had an hour long conversation with an experienced framebuilder, and this is my effort to even things up with some advice that I hope someone finds useful.

    Cheers,
    Ewen

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •