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  1. #1
    Genius
    Reputation: De La Pena's Avatar
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    Printing a bicycle with a 3D printer

    Wow. Sorry if a repost but this was new to me. Amazed.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  2. #2
    Ambivalent Luddite
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    Here's a similar technology using titanium for rear dropouts:

    3ders.org - Charge Bikes & EADS 3D printing titanium bicycle parts | 3D Printing news

  3. #3
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    How about 3-D printing to create lugs at any desired angle?

    Ralf Holleis

  4. #4
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    Well considering you can now print a car wheel and tyre in one go, ready to fit (just add air), I reckon anything is within reach. Maybe not a complete assembled bike - although you can print multiple assembled components, I think a bike is a little too complex at present - but pretty much anything that can be CNC'd, cast or forged is pretty simple with the right tools and a bit of brain power. And of course you can do a lot of things with additive manufacturing that you can't do with conventional methods and make designs more efficient.

  5. #5
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    This technology is pretty awesome. Here is my own attempt at using this technology in my own project.


    Shameless plug to my own project:
    Fooly's Major Glory


    Fooly
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Printing a bicycle with a 3D printer-linkage-650b-3-s.jpg  

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  6. #6
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    The Carbon Dungeon – Dirt #134 | Dirt

    This is relevant to the discussion, home made carbon FS that made heavy use of a 3D printer.

  7. #7
    will rant for food
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    This may not be an issue in the future, but don't 3D printed parts come out being anisotropic?

    Not trying to be a naysayer - educate me.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  8. #8
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    I think it depends on the process. The current home units are defiantly anisotropic, if you read up on the equipment you will notice the comments like, "you will need patience when creating parts." It will take trail and error to find what build method works best for EACH part you create.

    SLS (or DMLS) is much better and tends to be more uniform, although we can talk about grain boundaries and crack propagation till the cows come home. But in my case the limit on wall thickness means that I had to build my part much thicker than what I would have liked, and therefore the part is much stronger than necessary. This will offset what ever weakness caused by the production process.

  9. #9
    will rant for food
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    Quote Originally Posted by dacosta View Post
    I think it depends on the process. The current home units are defiantly anisotropic, if you read up on the equipment you will notice the comments like, "you will need patience when creating parts." It will take trail and error to find what build method works best for EACH part you create.

    SLS (or DMLS) is much better and tends to be more uniform, although we can talk about grain boundaries and crack propagation till the cows come home. But in my case the limit on wall thickness means that I had to build my part much thicker than what I would have liked, and therefore the part is much stronger than necessary. This will offset what ever weakness caused by the production process.
    Gotcha.

    Through whom did you have your linkage printed, and material used, if not too much to ask? I am knee deep in full suspension build right now, and I'm focusing on the linkage. The rest is relatively easy because the other parts of the design can be accomplished by tools I already have.

    Incidentally I do have a 3D printer that prints ABS. ...It sucks for anything larger than a 3 inch cube sized part.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  10. #10
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    I used GPI Prototype in Illinois. They are one of the few companies that I found that will do 6/4 Titanium.

    http://gpiprototype.com/

    I also found i.materialise, they have a great website for research on this topic. But more expensive since they are over in Belgium.

    3D Printing Service i.materialise | Home

    In the past I've used Forecast 3d for SLA/SLS part for my regular job. But at the time they didn't do DMLS, currently they are still limited in materials.

    Forecast 3D - Rapid Manufacturing & Rapid Prototyping, Short Run Production, Custom Parts with Additive Manufacturing Technologies


    Fooly

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